Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Water

Wa′ter

(wa̤′tẽr)
,
Noun.
[AS.
wæter
; akin to OS.
watar
, OFries.
wetir
,
weter
, LG. & D.
water
, G.
wasser
, OHG.
wazzar
, Icel.
vatn
, Sw.
vatten
, Dan.
vand
, Goth.
watō
, O. Slav. & Russ.
voda
, Gr.
ὔδωρ
, Skr.
udan
water,
ud
to wet, and perhaps to L.
unda
wave. √137. Cf.
Dropsy
,
Hydra
,
Otter
,
Wet
,
Whisky
.]
1.
The fluid which descends from the clouds in rain, and which forms rivers, lakes, seas, etc.
“We will drink water.”
Shak.
“Powers of fire, air, water, and earth.”
Milton.
☞ Pure water consists of hydrogen and oxygen,
H2O
, and is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, transparent liquid, which is very slightly compressible. At its maximum density, 39° Fahr. or 4° C., it is the standard for specific gravities, one cubic centimeter weighing one gram. It freezes at 32° Fahr. or 0° C. and boils at 212° Fahr. or 100° C. (see
Ice
,
Steam
). It is the most important natural solvent, and is frequently impregnated with foreign matter which is mostly removed by distillation; hence, rain water is nearly pure. It is an important ingredient in the tissue of animals and plants, the human body containing about two thirds its weight of water.
2.
A body of water, standing or flowing; a lake, river, or other collection of water.
Remembering he had passed over a small
water
a poor scholar when first coming to the university, he kneeled.
Fuller.
3.
Any liquid secretion, humor, or the like, resembling water; esp., the urine.
4.
(Pharm.)
A solution in water of a gaseous or readily volatile substance;
as, ammonia
water
.
U. S. Pharm.
5.
The limpidity and luster of a precious stone, especially a diamond;
as, a diamond of the first
water
, that is, perfectly pure and transparent
. Hence, of the first water, that is, of the first excellence.
6.
A wavy, lustrous pattern or decoration such as is imparted to linen, silk, metals, etc. See
Water
,
Verb.
T.
, 3,
Damask
,
Verb.
T.
, and
Damaskeen
.
7.
An addition to the shares representing the capital of a stock company so that the aggregate par value of the shares is increased while their value for investment is diminished, or “diluted.”
[Brokers’ Cant]
Water is often used adjectively and in the formation of many self-explaining compounds; as, water drainage; water gauge, or water-gauge; waterfowl, water-fowl, or water fowl; water-beaten; water-borne, water-circled, water-girdled, water-rocked, etc.
Hard water
.
See under
Hard
.
Inch of water
,
a unit of measure of quantity of water, being the quantity which will flow through an orifice one inch square, or a circular orifice one inch in diameter, in a vertical surface, under a stated constant head; also called
miner's inch
, and
water inch
. The shape of the orifice and the head vary in different localities. In the Western United States, for hydraulic mining, the standard aperture is square and the head from 4 to 9 inches above its center. In Europe, for experimental hydraulics, the orifice is usually round and the head from 1⁄12 of an inch to 1 inch above its top.
Mineral water
,
waters which are so impregnated with foreign ingredients, such as gaseous, sulphureous, and saline substances, as to give them medicinal properties, or a particular flavor or temperature.
Soft water
,
water not impregnated with lime or mineral salts.
To hold water
.
See under
Hold
,
Verb.
T.
To keep one's head above water
,
to keep afloat; fig., to avoid failure or sinking in the struggles of life.
[Colloq.]
To make water
.
(a)
To pass urine.
Swift.
(b)
(Naut.)
To admit water; to leak.
Water of crystallization
(Chem.)
,
the water combined with many salts in their crystalline form. This water is loosely, but, nevertheless, chemically, combined, for it is held in fixed and definite amount for each substance containing it. Thus, while pure copper sulphate,
CuSO4
, is a white amorphous substance, blue vitriol, the crystallized form,
CuSO4.5H2O
, contains five molecules of water of crystallization.
Water on the brain
(Med.)
,
hydrocephalus.
Water on the chest
(Med.)
,
hydrothorax.
☞ Other phrases, in which water occurs as the first element, will be found in alphabetical order in the Vocabulary.

Wa′ter

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Watered
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Watering
.]
[AS.
wæterian
, ge
wæterian
.]
1.
To wet or supply with water; to moisten; to overflow with water; to irrigate;
as, to
water
land; to
water
flowers.
With tears
watering
the ground.
Milton.
Men whose lives gilded on like rivers that
water
the woodlands.
Longfellow.
2.
To supply with water for drink; to cause or allow to drink;
as, to
water
cattle and horses
.
3.
To wet and calender, as cloth, so as to impart to it a lustrous appearance in wavy lines; to diversify with wavelike lines;
as, to
water
silk
. Cf.
Water
,
Noun.
, 6.
4.
To add water to (anything), thereby extending the quantity or bulk while reducing the strength or quality; to extend; to dilute; to weaken.
To water stock
,
to increase the capital stock of a company by issuing new stock, thus diminishing the value of the individual shares. Cf.
Water
,
Noun.
, 7.
[Brokers' Cant]

Wa′ter

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To shed, secrete, or fill with, water or liquid matter;
as, his eyes began to
water
.
If thine eyes can
water
for his death.
Shakespeare
2.
To get or take in water;
as, the ship put into port to
water
.
The mouth waters
,
a phrase denoting that a person or animal has a longing desire for something, since the sight of food often causes one who is hungry to have an increased flow of saliva.

Webster 1828 Edition


Water

WATER

,
Noun.
Wauter. [G., Gr.]
1.
A fluid, the most abundant and most necessary for living beings of any in nature, except air. Water when pure, is colorless, destitute of taste and smell, ponderous, transparent, and in a very small degree compressible. It is reposited in the earth in inexhaustible quantities, where it is preserved fresh and cool, and from which it issues in springs, which form streams and rivers. But the great reservoirs of water on the globe are the ocean, seas and lakes, which cover more than three fifths of its surface, and from which it is raised by evaporation, and uniting with the air in the state of vapor, is wafted over the earth, ready to be precipitated in the form of rain, snow or hail.
Water by the abstraction or loss of heat becomes solid, or in other words, is converted into ice or snow; and by heat it is converted into steam, an elastic vapor, one of the most powerful agents in nature. Modern chemical experiments prove that water is a compound substance, consisting of a combination of oxygen and hydrogen gases, or rather the bases or ponderable matter of those gases; or about two volumes or measures of hydrogen gas and one of oxygen gas. The proportion of the ingredients in weight, is nearly 85 parts of oxygen to 15 of hydrogen.
2.
The ocean; a sea; a lake; a river; any great collection of water; as in the phrases, to go by water, to travel by water.
3.
Urine; the animal liquor secreted by the kidneys and discharged from the bladder.
4.
The color or luster of a diamond or pearl, sometimes perhaps of other precious stones; as a diamond of the first water, that is, perfectly pure and transparent. Hence the figurative phrase, a man or a genius of the first water, that is, of the first excellence.
5.
Water is a name given to several liquid substances or humors in animal bodies; as the water of the pericardium, of dropsy, &c.
Mineral waters, are those waters which are so impregnated with foreign ingredients, such as gaseous, sulphurous and saline substances, as to give them medicinal, or at least sensible properties. Most natural waters contain more or less of these foreign substances, but the proportion is generally too minute to affect the senses.
To hold water, to be sound or tight. [Obsolete or vulgar.]

Definition 2021


Water

Water

See also: water, wáter, wàter, and wāter

German Low German

Alternative forms

Noun

Water n (plural Waters) (compare High German: Wasser n pl or Wässer n pl)

  1. (in most dialects, including Low Prussian) water (H₂O)

Derived terms

See also

References

  • Der neue SASS: Plattdeutsches Wörterbuch, Plattdeutsch - Hochdeutsch, Hochdeutsch - Plattdeutsch. Plattdeutsche Rechtschreibung, sixth revised edition (2011, ISBN 978-3-529-03000-0, Wachholtz Verlag, Neumünster)

water

water

See also: wáter, wàter, wāter, and Water

English

Wikiquote

Wikiversity

Alternative forms

Noun

water (1,2)

water (countable and uncountable, plural waters)

  1. (uncountable) A substance (of molecular formula H₂O) found at room temperature and pressure as a clear liquid; it is present naturally as rain, and found in rivers, lakes and seas; its solid form is ice and its gaseous form is steam.
    By the action of electricity, the water was resolved into its two parts, oxygen and hydrogen.
    • 2013 September-October, Katie L. Burke, In the News”, in American Scientist:
      Oxygen levels on Earth skyrocketed 2.4 billion years ago, when cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis: the ability to convert water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and waste oxygen using solar energy.
    1. (uncountable, in particular) The liquid form of this substance: liquid H₂O.
      May I have a glass of water?
      Your plants need more water.
      • 1835, Sir John Ross, Sir James Clark Ross, Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage , Volume 1, pp.284-5
        Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
      • 2002, Arthur T. Hubbard, Encyclopedia of Surface and Colloid Science (ISBN 0824707966), page 4895:
        A water drop placed on the surface of ice can either spread or form a lens depending on the properties of the three phases involved in wetting, i.e., on the properties of the ice, water, and gas phases.
      • 2013 May 11, The climate of Tibet: Pole-land”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8835, page 80:
        Of all the transitions brought about on the Earth’s surface by temperature change, the melting of ice into water is the starkest. It is binary. And for the land beneath, the air above and the life around, it changes everything.
      • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:water.
    2. (countable) A serving of liquid water.
      • 2006, Lori Foster, Erin McCarthy, Amy Garvey, Bad Boys of Summer, ISBN 0758209347, page 91:
        Joe bustled back and offered her a glass of wine but she shook her head. “Just a water, please.”
  2. (alchemy, philosophy) The aforementioned liquid, considered one of the Classical elements or basic elements of alchemy.
    He showed me the river of living water, sparkling like crystal, flowing from the throne of God.
  3. (often in the plural) Any body of water, or a specific part of it.
    The boat was found in within the territorial waters.
    These seals are a common sight on the coastal waters of Chile.
    We had a great view of the waters of this place.
    • 1526, William Tyndale (tr.), Bible, Acts VIII:
      And as they went on their waye, they cam unto a certayne water, and the gelded man sayde: Se here is water, what shall lett me to be baptised?
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      'Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.
  4. A combination of water and other substance(s).
    1. (sometimes countable) Mineral water.
      Perrier is the most popular water in this restaurant.
    2. (countable, often in the plural) Spa water.
      Many people visit Bath to take the waters.
    3. (pharmacy) A solution in water of a gaseous or readily volatile substance.
      ammonia water
    4. Urine. [from 15th c.]
      • 1999, George RR Martin, A Clash of Kings, Bantam, published 2011, page 458:
        Ser Dunaver's squire Jodge could not hold his water when he slept.
    5. Amniotic fluid; used in the plural in the UK and in singular in North America.
      Before the child is born, the pregnant woman’s waters break. (UK)
      Before the child is born, the pregnant woman’s water breaks. (North America)
    6. (colloquial, medicine) Fluids in the body, especially when causing swelling.
      He suffers from water on the knee.
  5. (figuratively, in the plural or in the singular) A state of affairs; conditions; usually with an adjective indicating an adverse condition.
    The rough waters of change will bring about the calm after the storm.
  6. (colloquial, figuratively) A person's intuition.
    I know he'll succeed. I feel it in my waters.
  7. (uncountable, dated, finance) Excess valuation of securities.
    • 1902 August 2, “Too Much Water to Suit Cummins”, in The Atlanta Constitution:
      Iowa Governor Will Fight Rock Island Reorganization. He Says That Under the New Plan Too Much Water Is Put Into the StockBelieves Plan Is Out of Harmony with Iowa Laws.
    • 1920 April 11, “Says Stock 'Water' Didn't Affect Fare”, in New York Times:
      the outstanding stock and bond obligations of the company were reduced from $34,000,000 to $24,000,000 by squeezing out the water.
  8. The limpidity and lustre of a precious stone, especially a diamond.
    a diamond of the first water, i.e. one that is perfectly pure and transparent
  9. A wavy, lustrous pattern or decoration such as is imparted to linen, silk, metals, etc.

Synonyms

  • See also Wikisaurus:water
  • See also Wikisaurus:urine

Antonyms

Hypernyms

Hyponyms

Meronyms

Derived terms

Translations

Descendants

  • Antigua and Barbuda Creole English: wata
  • Aukan: wataa
  • Belizean Creole: waata
  • Bislama: wota
  • Cameroon Pidgin: wata
  • Grenadian Creole English: wata
  • Gullah: wata
  • Islander Creole English: waata
  • Jamaican Creole: wata
  • Krio: wata
  • Kriol: woda
  • Nicaraguan Creole: wáta
  • Pichinglis: wàtá
  • Pijin: wata
  • Pitcairn-Norfolk: worta
  • Saramaccan: wáta
  • Sranan Tongo: watra
  • Tok Pisin: wara

Verb

water (third-person singular simple present waters, present participle watering, simple past and past participle watered)

to water (1)
  1. (transitive) To pour water into the soil surrounding (plants).
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, chapter 24, in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz:
      Aunt Em had just come out of the house to water the cabbages when she looked up and saw Dorothy running toward her.
  2. (transitive) To wet or supply with water; to moisten; to overflow with water; to irrigate.
    • Milton
      tears watering the ground
    • Longfellow
      Men whose lives glided on like rivers that water the woodlands.
  3. (transitive) To provide (animals) with water for drinking.
    I need to go water the cattle.
  4. (intransitive) To get or take in water.
    The ship put into port to water.
  5. (transitive, colloquial) To urinate onto.
    Nature called, so I stepped into the woods and watered a tree.
  6. (transitive) To dilute.
    Can you water the whisky, please?
  7. (transitive, dated, finance) To overvalue (securities), especially through deceptive accounting.
    • 1930 April 10, “Calls Rail Holding Companies Threat”, in The Sun:
      such agencies would make it possible for the railroads to water stock and evade the law subjecting security issues to public regulation
  8. (intransitive) To fill with or secrete water.
    Chopping onions makes my eyes water.
    The smell of fried onions makes my mouth water.
  9. (transitive) To wet and calender, as cloth, so as to impart to it a lustrous appearance in wavy lines; to diversify with wavelike lines.
    to water silk

Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: next · poor · present · #259: water · stood · large · within

Anagrams

References

  • water in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • water in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch water. Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *watōr, from Proto-Indo-European *wódr̥.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɑːtər/

Noun

water (plural waters)

  1. water
  2. any artificial fluid similar to water
  3. (colloquial) urine
  4. any body of water, such as a river or a lake
  5. a disease where water is accumulated; hydrops
  6. (in the plural) a large quantity of water; inundation

Verb

water (present water, present participle waterende, past participle gewater)

  1. to urinate
  2. to secrete liquid

Derived terms

References

  • Jan Kromhout, Afrikaans-English, English-Afrikaans Dictionary (2001)

Dutch Low Saxon

Etymology

From Old Saxon watar, from Proto-Germanic *watōr, from Proto-Indo-European *wódr̥.

Noun

water

  1. (Drents, Twents) water

French

Etymology

Apocopic form of water-closet, a borrowing from English water closet.

Noun

water m (plural waters)

  1. toilet, bathroom
  2. apocopic form of water-closet

Italian

Etymology

Shortened form of English water closet (W.C.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈva.ter/, [ˈväːt̪ɛr]

Noun

water m (invariable)

  1. (colloquial) water closet, toilet

Limburgish

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *watōr, from Proto-Indo-European *wódr̥.

Noun

water n

  1. water
  2. body of water

Inflection

Inflection
Root singular Root plural Diminutive singular Diminutive plural
Nominative water watere waeterke waeterkes
Genitive waters watere waeterkes waeterkes
Locative wateves watevese waeterke waeterkes
Dative¹ watevem ? ? ?
Accusative¹ water watere ? ?
  • Dative and accusative are nowadays obsolete, use nominative instead.
  • Plural and diminutive only used for the meaning body of water.

Derived terms

References

  • Stefaan Top, Limburgs sagenboek (2004), page 45

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch watar, from Proto-Germanic *watōr, from Proto-Indo-European *wódr̥.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈwaːtər/

Noun

water n

  1. water

Descendants


Middle English

Etymology

From Old English wæter, from Proto-Germanic *watōr, from Proto-Indo-European *wódr̥.

Noun

water (plural waters)

  1. water (liquid H2O)
    • c. 1190, Layamon, Brut, MS. Cotton Caligula A ix edition:
      al ſwa great ſwa a beam: / þe he leide in ane walle ſtream. / Þe ilke makeð þat water hot: / & þan folc halwende.

Quotations

  • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:water.

Descendants

Derived terms


Middle Low German

Pronunciation

  • (originally) IPA(key): /waːtər/

Etymology

From Old Saxon watar, from Proto-Germanic *watōr, from Proto-Indo-European *wódr̥.

Noun

wāter n

  1. water
    • 1537, Jürgen Richolff the Younger, Datt högeste unde öldeste water recht, xxviii:
      Eyn schip effte twe effte meer liggen in einer hauen dar kleyn water is / vnde plecht dröge tho synde / also dat dat eyne schip hart by dem andern tho liggende kumpt []
      A ship or two or more lie in a port with little water, which tends to be dry, so that one the ship comes to lie close by the other []

Declension

Descendants

  • German Low German: Water

Occitan

Etymology

Shortened form of English water closet (W.C.)

Noun

water m

  1. (colloquial) water closet, toilet, rest room