Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Sin

Sin

,
adv.
, p
rep.
, & c
onj.
Old form of
Since
.
[Obs. or Prov. Eng. & Scot.]
Sin
that his lord was twenty year of age.
Chaucer.

Sin

,
Noun.
[OE.
sinne
, AS.
synn
,
syn
; akin to D.
zonde
, OS.
sundia
, OHG.
sunta
, G.
sünde
, Icel., Dan. & Sw.
synd
, L.
sons
,
sontis
, guilty, perhaps originally from the p. pr. of the verb signifying, to be, and meaning, the one who it is. Cf.
Authentic
,
Sooth
.]
1.
Transgression of the law of God; disobedience of the divine command; any violation of God’s will, either in purpose or conduct; moral deficiency in the character; iniquity;
as,
sins
of omission and
sins
of commission
.
Whosoever committeth
sin
is the servant of
sin
.
John viii. 34.
Sin
is the transgression of the law.
1 John iii. 4.
I think 't no
sin
.
To cozen him that would unjustly win.
Shakespeare
Enthralled
By
sin
to foul, exorbitant desires.
Milton.
2.
An offense, in general; a violation of propriety; a misdemeanor;
as, a
sin
against good manners
.
I grant that poetry's a crying
sin
.
Pope.
3.
A sin offering; a sacrifice for sin.
He hath made him to be
sin
for us, who knew no sin.
2 Cor. v. 21.
4.
An embodiment of sin; a very wicked person.
[R.]
Thy ambition,
Thou scarlet
sin
, robbed this bewailing land
Of noble Buckingham.
Shakespeare
Sin is used in the formation of some compound words of obvious signification; as, sin-born; sin-bred, sin-oppressed, sin-polluted, and the like.
Actual sin
,
Canonical sins
,
Original sin
,
Venial sin
.
See under
Actual
,
Canonical
, etc.
Deadly sins
, or
Mortal sins
(R. C. Ch.)
,
willful and deliberate transgressions, which take away divine grace; – in distinction from vental sins. The seven deadly sins are pride, covetousness, lust, wrath, gluttony, envy, and sloth.
Sin eater
,
a man who (according to a former practice in England) for a small gratuity ate a piece of bread laid on the chest of a dead person, whereby he was supposed to have taken the sins of the dead person upon himself.
Sin offering
,
a sacrifice for sin; something offered as an expiation for sin.
Syn. – Iniquity; wickedness; wrong. See
Crime
.

Sin

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Sinned
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Sinning
.]
[OE.
sinnen
,
singen
,
sinegen
, AS.
syngian
. See
Sin
,
Noun.
]
1.
To depart voluntarily from the path of duty prescribed by God to man; to violate the divine law in any particular, by actual transgression or by the neglect or nonobservance of its injunctions; to violate any known rule of duty; – often followed by against.
Against thee, thee only, have I
sinned
.
Ps. li. 4.
All have
sinned
, and come short of the glory of God.
Rom. iii. 23.
2.
To violate human rights, law, or propriety; to commit an offense; to trespass; to transgress.
I am a man
More
sinned
against than
sinning
.
Shakespeare
Who but wishes to invert the laws
Of order,
sins
against the eternal cause.
Pope.

Webster 1828 Edition


Sin

SIN

, n.
1.
The voluntary departure of a moral agent from a known rule of rectitude or duty, prescribed by God; any voluntary transgression of the divine law, or violation of a divine command; a wicked act; iniquity. Sin is either a positive act in which a known divine law is violated, or it is the voluntary neglect to obey a positive divine command, or a rule of duty clearly implied in such command. Sin comprehends not action only, but neglect of known duty, all evil thoughts purposes, words and desires, whatever is contrary to God's commands or law. 1 John 3. Matt. 15. James 4. Sinner neither enjoy the pleasures of nor the peace of piety. Among divines, sin is original or actual. Actual sin, above defined, is the act of a moral agent in violating a known rule of duty. Original sin, as generally understood, is native depravity of heart to the divine will, that corruption of nature of deterioration of the moral character of man, which is supposed to be the effect of Adam's apostasy; and which manifests itself in moral agents by positive act of disobedience to the divine will, or by the voluntary neglect to comply with the express commands of God, which require that we should love God with all the heart and soul and strength and mind, and our neighbor as ourselves. This native depravity or alienation of affections from God and his law, is supposed to be what the apostle calls the carnal mind or mindedness, which is enmity against God, and is therefore denominated sin or sinfulness. Unpardonable sin, or blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, is supposed to be a malicious and obstinate rejection of Christ and the gospel plan of salvation, or a contemptuous resistance made to the influences and convictions of the Holy Spirit. Matt.12.
2.
A sin-offering; an offering made to atone for sin. He hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin. 2 Cor 5.
3.
A man enormously wicked. [Not in use.]
4.
Sin differs from crime, not in nature, but in application. That which is a crime against society, is sin against God.

Definition 2021


Sin

Sin

See also: Appendix:Variations of "sin"

English

Proper noun

Sin

  1. (Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian mythology) The god of the moon.

Synonyms

  • (Sumerian equivalent): Nanna

Anagrams


Hausa

Proper noun

Sin f

  1. China

sin

sin

See also: Appendix:Variations of "sin"

Translingual

Symbol

sin

  1. (mathematics) A symbol of the trigonometric function sine.

English

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sĭn, IPA(key): /sɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Noun

sin (plural sins)

  1. (theology) A violation of God's will or religious law.
    I'm Christian and I think that's a sin against God.
  2. A misdeed.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess:
      The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. [] The second note, the high alarum, not so familiar and always important since it indicates the paramount sin in Man's private calendar, took most of them by surprise although they had been well prepared.
  3. A sin offering; a sacrifice for sin.
    • Bible, 2 Corinthians v. 21
      He hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin.
  4. An embodiment of sin; a very wicked person.
    • William Shakespeare
      Thy ambition, / Thou scarlet sin, robbed this bewailing land / Of noble Buckingham.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

sin (third-person singular simple present sins, present participle sinning, simple past and past participle sinned)

  1. (intransitive, theology) To commit a sin.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Modification of shin.

Alternative forms

Noun

sin (plural sins)

  1. A letter of the Hebrew alphabet; שׂ
  2. A letter of the Arabic alphabet; س

Anagrams


Aromanian

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin sinus. Compare Romanian sân.

Noun

sin n (plural sinj)

  1. breast

See also


Asturian

Preposition

sin

  1. Alternative form of ensin

Breton

Etymology

From Latin signum.

Noun

sin m

  1. sign

Danish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -in

Pronoun

sin c (neuter sit, plural sine)

  1. (reflexive possessive) third-person sg pronoun, meaning his/her/its (own)
    Han læste sin bog - He read his (own) book
    Compare: Han læste hans bog - He read his (somebody else's) book

See also


Esperanto

Pronoun

sin

  1. accusative of si

Fon

Noun

sin

  1. water

References

  • Claire Lefebvre, Anne-Marie Brousseau, A Grammar of Fongbe (2002, ISBN 3110173603)

Gun

Noun

sin

  1. water

References

  • Aspect and Modality in Kwa Languages (2006, ISBN 9027205671)

Hausa

Noun

sin f

  1. Letter of the Arabic alphabet: س

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɪːn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪːn

Noun

sin f (genitive singular sinar, nominative plural sinar)

  1. sinew, tendon

Declension


Irish

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old Irish sin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃɪnʲ/

Determiner

sin

  1. (used with the definite article) that
    an buachaill sin ― that boy

Pronoun

sin (demonstrative pronoun)

  1. that
    Sin é mo dheartháir.
    That is my brother.

Derived terms

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sin shin
after an, tsin
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Ladino

Etymology

From Latin sine.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sin/

Preposition

sin

  1. without

Antonyms


Latin

Conjunction

sīn

  1. but if

Livonian

Pronoun

sin

  1. singular genitive form of sinā

Lojban

Rafsi

sin

  1. rafsi of tsina.

Menien

Noun

sin

  1. water

References

  • Martius, Beiträge zur Ethnographie und Sprachenkunde Brasiliens, page 155

Middle Low German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /siːn/

Etymology 1

From Old Saxon sīn, from Proto-Germanic *sīnaz.

Alternative forms

  • sîner (for the genitive of the personal pronoun)

Pronoun

sîn

  1. (personal pronoun, third person, singular, masculine, genitive) of his
    • lohant ret her Zeno hen na Verona to dem vader sin.
      John rode Sir Zeno to Verona, to the father of his.
  2. (personal pronoun, third person, singular, neuter, genitive) of it
  3. (possessive, third person, singular, masculine) his
  4. (possessive, third person, neuter, masculine) its

Declension

Personal pronoun:

Possessive pronoun:

Etymology 2

From Old Saxon sīn.

Verb

sîn

  1. to be

Usage notes
  • Sin/wesen is a verb with two infinitives and mostly identical conjugation, similar to Dutch zijn/wezen. Some forms, such as the imperative (sit/west), may differ depending on the infinitive preferred, but in general which one was used was a matter of personal preference. (This is also true for modern Low German.)

Alternative forms


Miskito

Adverb

sin

  1. also, too

Navajo

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sɪ̀n]

Etymology

Compare Tlingit shí, shī, shi(n) (“sing, song”), Eyak tsį, Dena'ina shen, Galice šan (song), Lipan shį̀.

Noun

sin (possessed form biyiin)

  1. song

Inflection


Northern Sami

Pronoun

sin

  1. accusative and genitive of sii

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse sinn.

Pronoun

sin m (feminine si, neuter sitt, plural sine)

  1. (reflexive) her / his / its / their
  2. indicating possession; 's, of
    Det var skolen sin bil.
    It was the school's car.

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse sinn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sin/ (example of pronunciation)

Pronoun

sin m (feminine si, neuter sitt, plural sine)

  1. (reflexive) her/his/its/their
  2. indicating possession; 's, of
    Det var skulen sin bil.
    It was the the school's car.

References


Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *sīnaz.

Determiner

sīn m, n

  1. his, its

Descendants


Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *sīnaz (his, her, its, their, genitive reflexive), from Proto-Indo-European *seynos (his), genitive of *só (that). Cognate with Old Frisian sīn (his, its), Old Saxon sīn (his) (Middle Low German sin), Dutch zijn, Old High German sīn (his) (German sein), Old Norse sínn (one's own), Old English (that, that one, he). More at the.

Pronoun

sīn

  1. (rare, chiefly dialectal, reflexive possessive pronoun) His; her; its; their.
    him Hrōþgār ġewāt tō hofe sīnum — For him Hrothgar went to his courtyard
    þæt wīf tredeð mid sīnum fōtom — The woman walked with her feet
    þec Israhēla heriað, herran sīnne — Israel plunders thee, their lords

Usage notes

  • Usually occurs in non-West Saxon dialects; rarely occurs in West Saxon prose, where it was replaced early on by the genitive forms: his, hiere and hiera.

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *sindos (compare Welsh hyn), from Proto-Indo-European *sḗm (one) or *só (that); strong doublet of in (the).

Determiner

sin

  1. that (used after the noun, which is preceded by the definite article)
    a ndéde sin – "that pair (of things)"

Synonyms

Descendants

Pronoun

sin

  1. that (as a direct object, used together with a clitic pronoun)
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 14d26
      Is i persin Crist da·gníu-sa sin.
      It is in the person of Christ that I do that.

Old Saxon

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *sīnaz.

Determiner

sīn m, n

  1. (dialectal, reflexive possessive pronoun) his, its
    • that thar sīn ist: that sculun iuuua seolon uuesen
      Those are his lies: that they shall be your souls
      (Heliand, verse 3832)
Declension


Descendants

See also

Etymology 2

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁es- (to be, exist) (with some parts from Proto-Germanic *wesaną (to be)). Cognate with Old Dutch sīn (to be), Old English sēon (to be), Old High German sīn. More at sooth.

Verb

sīn (irregular)

  1. to be (more at wesan)
Conjugation
Descendants

Picard

Pronoun

sin m

  1. his, hers or its

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish sin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʃɪn]

Pronoun

sin

  1. that
    Dè tha sin? - What is that?

Derived terms

Determiner

sin

  1. (used with the definite article) that
    an gille sin — that boy

Derived terms


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *synъ, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sîːn/

Noun

sȋn m (Cyrillic spelling си̑н)

  1. son
Declension

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sîn/

Noun

sȉn m (Cyrillic spelling си̏н)

  1. sin (letter of various Semitic abjads)
Declension

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *synъ, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

Noun

sín m anim (genitive sína or sinú, nominative plural síni or sinôvi)

  1. son

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin sine.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sin/

Preposition

sin

  1. without

Antonyms

Related terms


Swedish

Etymology 1

Nominalisation of sina (run dry).

Noun

sin ?

  1. Dryness, the state of having run dry.
Usage notes

Most commonly used when referring to either milk or funds.

Etymology 2

From Old Swedish sīn, from Old Norse sínn, from Proto-Germanic *sīnaz. Cognate with Danish sin, Gothic 𐍃𐌴𐌹𐌽𐍃 (seins), German sein, Dutch zijn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /siːn/

Pronoun

sin c (neuter sitt, plural sina)

  1. his (own), her (own), its (own), their (own). (Reflexive possessive third person pronoun).
    Han hämtade sin post för tio minuter sedan
    He picked up his (own) mail ten minutes ago
    Compare: Han hämtade hans post för tio minuter sedan
    He picked up his (somebody else’s) mail ten minutes ago.
    Hon samlar sina dikter i en låda
    She collects her poems in a box
    Hunden tycker inte om sitt halsband
    The dog doesn’t like its collar
    De tog sina papper och lämnade mötet
    They gathered their papers and left the meeting
Usage notes
  • The inflection of the word sin is determined by the gender and number of the object: sin for common singular, sitt for neuter singular, and sina for plural, just like an adjective.
Declension

Tatar

Pronoun

sin

  1. you (singular), thou

Vietnamese

Noun

sin

  1. (trigonometry) sine

West Frisian

Noun

sin ?

  1. sentence
  2. sense