Definify.com

Definition 2022


Ju

Ju

See also: Appendix:Variations of "ju"

English

Proper noun

Ju

  1. A surname of Chinese origin.
  2. (historical geography) A former prefecture of imperial China centered on Juzhou in what is now Guizhou Province.

Synonyms

  • (prefecture): Juzhou

ju

ju

See also: Appendix:Variations of "ju"

Albanian

Pronoun

ju (accusative ju, dative juve, ablative jush)

  1. you (plural or polite)

Declension

See also


Bilua

Noun

ju

  1. water

References

  • A Grammar of Bilua: A Papuan Language of the Solomon Islands (2003)

Borôro

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒuː/

Noun

ju

  1. manioc

Dalmatian

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *eo, from Latin ego.

Pronoun

ju

  1. (first person singular pronoun) I

Related terms

See also


Dutch

Pronunciation

Interjection

ju

  1. Said to a horse to make it start moving.

Esperanto

Etymology

From Swedish ju, German je.

Particle

ju

  1. the; used with des and either pli (more) or malpli (less) to form the first half of a coordinated comparative.
    • 1903, Ben Elmy, “La Lingvo de la floroj”, in The Esperantist: The Esperanto Gazette for the Spreading of the International Language, page 138,
      Ju pli ni studas la florojn, des pli ni konstatas, ke multe da ili posedas nesuspektitajn lertecojn, kiujn apud besto ni volonte nomus instinkto aŭ еĉ prudento.
      The more we study the flowers, the more we establish that many of them possess unexpected abilities, which in an animal we would willingly call instinct or even foresight.”

See also


Gothic

Romanization

ju

  1. Romanization of 𐌾𐌿

Greenlandic

Affix

ju (after long vowels)

  1. to be
    tulukkaajuvoq - It is a young raven.

Japanese

Romanization

ju

  1. rōmaji reading of じゅ
  2. rōmaji reading of ジュ
  3. rōmaji reading of ぢゅ
  4. rōmaji reading of ヂュ

Ladin

Adverb

ju

  1. down, below
  2. downstairs

Lojban

Cmavo

ju (rafsi juv)

  1. (conjunction) whether (or not). Joins two predicate words in a complex predicate.

Derived terms

Related terms


Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈju]

Pronoun

ju

  1. accusative of wóna

Related terms

  • nju (after preposition)

Mandarin

Romanization

ju

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Maquiritari

Alternative forms

  • (De'kwana): juu

Noun

ju

  1. (Ye'kwana dialect) hair of the head

References

  • Ed. Key, Mary Ritchie and Comrie, Bernard. The Intercontinental Dictionary Series, Carib (De'kwana).
  • Cáceres, Natalia. Grammaire Fonctionelle-Typologique du Ye'kwana.

Middle Low German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /juː(w)/

Etymology

From Old Saxon iu, from Proto-Germanic *izwiz.

Pronoun

  1. (personal pronoun, second person, plural, accusative) you
  2. (personal pronoun, second person, plural, dative) you
  3. (possessive, second person, plural) your

Declension

Personal pronoun:

Possessive pronoun:


Old French

Noun

ju m (oblique plural jus, nominative singular jus, nominative plural ju)

  1. Alternative form of geu

Old Frisian

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *izwiz.

Pronoun

  1. Accusative and dative form of

Declension

Descendants

  • West Frisian: jo

Saterland Frisian

Article

ju f

  1. the

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

Clitic of nju

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ju/

Pronoun

ju (Cyrillic spelling ју)

  1. her (clitic accusative singular of òna (she))
Declension

Etymology 2

Form of iju

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ju/

Interjection

ju (Cyrillic spelling ју)

  1. Used to express surprise.

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɵ/, /jʉː/

Adverb

ju

  1. Used to indicate an expectation of common understanding, or that what is said is an obvious fact.
    Bussen går ju klockan tre.
    The bus of course leaves at three o' clock. (with an expectation that the second party in the conversation is aware of the fact)

ju...desto

  1. The...the (when comparing)
    Ju större, desto bättre.
    The larger, the better.

Wauja

Interjection

ju

  1. my dear(s), dearie (intimate yet very courteous term of address from one woman to another, esp. to a female sibling, close relative, or companion)
    Hai, ju! Aya awauta apisun wiu. Ume eu. Aya awauta apisun wiu, ju. Hoona! Iseju, wi.
    "Well, dear! Let's find ourselves a lover," she said. "Let's look for a lover for ourselves, my dear." "Agreed!" [said] her younger sister.
    Pitsu neke, ju! uma pakai paiseju ipitsi. Pitsu neke, ju.
    "Your turn now, dearie," the woman said to her younger sister. "Your turn, my dear."
    Munyakawaka wi, kamwo putukawiu, naatsa kamwi eu whun. Hoona! Hai, ju! Aya waku wiu, ju! Hoona! uma pakai. Aya waku wi! Tuma ulepiu!
    It began to be light, the sun showed itself, it was just here on the horizon. So! [The women said to one another:] "Hey there, my dear! Let's go to the riverside, dear!" "Yes, let's do!" came the reply. "Let's go to the river, indeed!" They began to make fresh manioc bread [to give their lover when they met him at the river's edge].
    Ayama ju! Hoona! Iyapai otepo. Onupene otepoga akain! Eh! Ewetemewi, ju! Hokotawi tsiiiii!
    "Let's go [visit the tree] once again, dear!" [the older sister said to the younger]. "All right!" [the younger sister agreed]. [They] went under [the tree]. They saw pequi fruit [on the ground] beneath [the tree]! "Ah! Let's taste it, dear!" [She] cut [it] open: tsiiiii! [sound of slicing open the fruit]

Usage notes

  • "My dear" is a rough translation of the term ju, as there is no counterpart in modern English. This is a traditional term of address between women who are speaking in a tone that is both intimate and gracious. It is simultaneously polite and tender, expressing feminine solicitude at its most comforting. Though this term was routinely used by well-spoken female elders in 1981, it was already beginning to be seen by young people as archaic. Older women would teach the anthropologist to use this lovely old term, and remark that young women nowadays no longer bothered to use it. Meanwhile, young female relatives within earshot typically would just giggle. A few decades later, it was rarely heard in daily speech, and more likely to be encountered in traditional stories. Note that it is not a kinship term, but more like a term of gender solidarity.

See also

  • tya (my man, guys, fellas)

References

  • "Hai, ju!" (transcript, p. 9), "Pitsu neke" (p. 33), "Munyakawaka wi" (p. 57), and "Ayama ju!" (p. 72), uttered by Aruta, storyteller and elder, as he recounted the traditional tale, "The Caiman Spirit" (Yakaojokuma). Recorded in Piyulaga village in the presence of assembled elders and others, November 1989. In this story, a chief, who already has two wives, takes two additional ones, causing the first two wives to feel neglected, and to decide to take a lover. The dialogue between the two women makes extensive use of ju in a comedic manner, showing the two woman so utterly jealous at their husband's taking two new wives that they completely — and quite unnaturally — put aside any jealousy between themselves. With utmost courtesy and decorum, the women in the story calmly take turns receiving the amorous attentions of their shared paramour, something it is impossible to imagine any Wauja woman tolerating, which makes the story all the more amusing.