Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Element

El′e-ment

,
Noun.
[F.
élément
, L.
elementum
.]
1.
One of the simplest or essential parts or principles of which anything consists, or upon which the constitution or fundamental powers of anything are based.
2.
One of the ultimate, undecomposable constituents of any kind of matter. Specifically:
(Chem.)
A substance which cannot be decomposed into different kinds of matter by any means at present employed;
as, the
elements
of water are oxygen and hydrogen
.
The Elements

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Name |Sym-| Atomic Weight |
|bol | O=16 | H=1 | C=12.000
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Aluminum | Al | 27.1 | 26.9 |
Antimony (Stibium) | Sb | 120 | 119.1 |
Argon | A | 39.9 | 39.6 |
Arsenic | As | 75 | 74.4 |
Astatine | At |
Barium | Ba | 137.4 | 136.4 |
Beryllium | Be |
Bismuth | Bi | 208.5 | 206.9 |
Boron | B | 11 | 10.9 |
Bromine | Br | 79.96 | 79.36|
Cadmium | Cd | 112.4 | 111.6 |
Cesium (Caesium) | Cs | 133 | 132 |
Calcium | Ca | 40 | 39.7 |
Carbon | C | 12 | 11.91| 12.000
Cerium | Ce | 140 | 139 |
Chlorine | Cl | 35.45 | 35.18|
Chromium | Cr | 52.1 | 51.7 |
Cobalt | Co |
Columbium (see
Beryllium
)
Copper | Cu |
(
Cuprum
)
Erbium | Er |
Europium | Eu |
Einsteinium | Es |
Fermium | Fe |
Fluorine | F |
Gadolinium | Gd |
Gallium | Ga |
Germanium | Ge |
Glucinum (now
Beryllium
)
Gold (Aurum) | Au |
Helium | He |
Hydrogen | H |
Indium | In |
Iodine | I |
Iridium | Ir |
Iron | Fe |
(Ferrum)
Krypton | Kr |
Lanthanum | La |
Lead | Pb |
(Plumbum)
Lithium | Li |
Magnesium | Mg |
Manganese | Mn |
Mercury | Hg |
(
Hydrargyrum
)
Molybdenum | Mo |
Neodymium | Nd |
Neon | Ne |
Nickel | Ni |
Niobium | Nb |
(see Columbium)
Nitrogen | N |
Osmium | Os |
Oxygen | O |
Palladium | Pd |
Phosphorus | P |
Platinum | Pt |
Potassium | K |
(Kalium)
Praseodymium | Pr |
Rhodium | Rh |
Rubidium | Rb |
Ruthenium | Ru |
Samarium | Sa |
Scandium | Sc |
Selenium | Se |
Silicon | Si |
Silver | Ag |
(Argentum)
Sodium | Na |
(Natrium)
Strontium | Sr |
Sulphur | S |
Tantalum | Ta |
Tellurium | Te |
Thallium | Tl |
Thorium | Th |
Thulium | Tu |
Tin | Sn |
(Stannum)
Titanium | Ti |
Tungsten | W |
(Wolframium)
Uranium | U |
Vanadium | V |
Wolfranium (see
Tungsten
)
Xenon | X |
Ytterbium | Yb |
Yttrium | Y |
Zinc | Zn |
Zirconium | Zr |
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Several other elements have been announced, as holmium, vesbium, austrium, etc., but their properties, and in some cases their existence, have not yet been definitely established.
3.
One of the ultimate parts which are variously combined in anything;
as, letters are the
elements
of written language
; hence, also, a simple portion of that which is complex, as a shaft, lever, wheel, or any simple part in a machine; one of the essential ingredients of any mixture; a constituent part;
as, quartz, feldspar, and mica are the
elements
of granite
.
The simplicity which is so large an
element
in a noble nature was laughed to scorn.
Jowett (Thucyd.).
4.
(a)
One out of several parts combined in a system of aggregation, when each is of the nature of the whole;
as, a single cell is an
element
of the honeycomb
.
(b)
(Anat.)
One of the smallest natural divisions of the organism, as a blood corpuscle, a muscular fiber.
5.
(Biol.)
One of the simplest essential parts, more commonly called cells, of which animal and vegetable organisms, or their tissues and organs, are composed.
6.
(Math.)
(a)
An infinitesimal part of anything of the same nature as the entire magnitude considered;
as, in a solid an
element
may be the infinitesimal portion between any two planes that are separated an indefinitely small distance
. In the calculus, element is sometimes used as synonymous with differential.
(b)
Sometimes a curve, or surface, or volume is considered as described by a moving point, or curve, or surface, the latter being at any instant called an element of the former.
(c)
One of the terms in an algebraic expression.
7.
One of the necessary data or values upon which a system of calculations depends, or general conclusions are based;
as, the
elements
of a planet’s orbit
.
8.
pl.
The simplest or fundamental principles of any system in philosophy, science, or art; rudiments;
as, the
elements
of geometry, or of music
.
9.
pl.
Any outline or sketch, regarded as containing the fundamental ideas or features of the thing in question;
as, the
elements
of a plan
.
10.
One of the simple substances, as supposed by the ancient philosophers; one of the imaginary principles of matter.
(a)
The four elements were, air, earth, water, and fire
;
whence it is said, water is the proper element of fishes; air is the element of birds. Hence, the state or sphere natural to anything or suited for its existence.
Of
elements

The grosser feeds the purer: Earth the Sea;
Earth and the Sea feed Air; the Air those Fires
Ethereal.
Milton.
Does not our life consist of the four
elements
?
Shakespeare
And the complexion of the
element
[i. e.,the sky or air]
In favor's like the work we have in hand,
Most bloody, fiery, and most terrible.
Shakespeare
About twelve ounces [of food], with mere
element
for drink.
Cheyne.
Esp.,
the conditions and movements of the air.
“The elements be kind to thee.”
(b)
The elements of the alchemists were salt, sulphur, and mercury.
Brande & C.
11.
pl.
The whole material composing the world.
The
elements
shall melt with fervent heat.
2 Peter iii. 10.
12.
pl.
(Eccl.)
The bread and wine used in the eucharist or Lord's supper.
Magnetic element
,
one of the hypothetical elementary portions of which a magnet is regarded as made up.

El′e-ment

(ĕl′ē̍-mĕnt)
,
Verb.
T.
1.
To compound of elements or first principles.
[Obs.]
“[Love] being elemented too.”
Donne.
2.
To constitute; to make up with elements.
His very soul was
elemented
of nothing but sadness.
Walton.

Webster 1828 Edition


Element

EL'EMENT

,
Noun.
[L. elementus.]
1.
The first or constituent principle or minutest part or any thing; as the elements of earth, water, salt, or wood; the elements of the world; the elements of animal or vegetable bodies. So letters are called the elements of language.
2.
An ingredient; a constituent part of any composition.
3.
In a chimical sense, an atom; the minutest particle of a substance; that which cannot be divided by chimical analysis, and therefore considered as a simple substance, as oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, &c.
An element is strictly the last result of chimical analysis; that which cannot be decomposed by any means now employed.
An atom is the last result of mechanical division; that which cannot be any farther divided, without decomposition; hence there may be both elementary and compound atoms.
4.
In the plural, the first rules or principles of an art or science; rudiments; as the elements of geometry; the elements of music; the elements of painting; the elements of a theory.
5.
In popular language, fire,air, earth and water, are called the four elements, as formerly it was supposed that these are simple bodies,of which the world is composed. Later discoveries prove air, earth and water to be compound bodies,and fire to be only the extrication of light and heat during combustion.
6.
Element, in the singular, is sometimes used for the air.
7.
The substance which forms the natural or most suitable habitation of an animal. Water is the proper element of fishes; air, of man. Hence,
8.
The proper state or sphere of any thing; the state of things suited to one's temper or habits. Faction is the element of a demagogue.
9.
The matter or substances which compose the world.
The elements shall melt with fervent heat. 2 Pet.3.
10. The outline or sketch; as the elements of a plan.
11. Moving cause or principle; that which excites action.
Passions, the elements of life.

Definition 2021


Element

Element

See also: element and élément

German

Noun

Element n (genitive Elements or Elementes, plural Elemente)

  1. element

Declension

element

element

See also: Element and élément

English

Noun

element (plural elements)

  1. One of the simplest or essential parts or principles of which anything consists, or upon which the constitution or fundamental powers of anything are based.
    Letters are the elements of written language.
    • Benjamin Jowett (1817-1893) (Thucydides)
      The simplicity which is so large an element in a noble nature was laughed to scorn.
    1. (chemistry) Any one of the simplest chemical substances that cannot be decomposed in a chemical reaction or by any chemical means and made up of atoms all having the same number of protons.
    2. One of the four basic building blocks of matter in theories of ancient philosophers and alchemists: water, earth, fire, and air.
    3. (law) A required aspect or component of a cause of action. A deed is regarded a violation of law only if each element can be proved.
    4. (set theory) One of the objects in a set.
  2. A small part of the whole.
    an element of doubt; an element of the picture
    • 1927, F. E. Penny, chapter 4, in Pulling the Strings:
      The case was that of a murder. It had an element of mystery about it, however, which was puzzling the authorities. A turban and loincloth soaked in blood had been found; also a staff.
  3. (plural only, with "the") Atmospheric forces such as strong winds and rains.
    exposed to the elements
  4. A place or state of being that an individual or object is better suited towards.
    to be in one's own element
  5. (Christianity, chiefly in the plural) The bread and wine taken at Holy Communion.
  6. A group of people within a larger group having a particular common characteristic.
    You sometimes find the hooligan element at football matches.
  7. A component in electrical equipment, often in the form of a coil, having a high resistance, thereby generating heat when a current is passed through it.
    The element in this electric kettle can heat the water in under a minute.
  8. (computing) One of the conceptual objects in a markup language, usually represented in text by a matching pair of tags.
    • 2011, Richard Wagner, Creating Web Pages All-in-One For Dummies
      The div element was introduced into HTML as a solution to the layout problem.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

External links

  • element in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • element in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Anagrams

References

  • Lehmann, R.G. (2011). "27-30-22-26 - How many letters needs an alphabet?". In de Voogt, A.; Quack, J.F. The Idea of Writing: Writing Across Borders. Brill. pp. 15–16, note 8.

Catalan

Noun

element m (plural elements)

  1. element

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

Latin elementum.

Noun

element

  1. element.

Declension

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary], Simferopol: Dolya, ISBN 966-7980-89-8

Danish

Noun

element n (singular definite elementet, plural indefinite elementer)

  1. (set theory) element

Declension

References


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ele‧ment
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Etymology

From Old French element, from Latin elementum (a first principle, element, rudiment); origin uncertain. Perhaps ultimately from L M N, first three letters of the second half of the Canaanite alphabet, recited by ancient scribes when learning it (in sense compare English ABC(s) (fundamentals)).

Noun

element n (plural elementen, diminutive elementje n)

  1. element
  2. (chemistry) element
  3. (set theory) element

Anagrams


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin elementum

Noun

element n (definite singular elementet, indefinite plural element or elementer, definite plural elementa or elementene)

  1. an element

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin elementum

Noun

element n (definite singular elementet, indefinite plural element, definite plural elementa)

  1. an element

References


Polish

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /ɛˈlɛ.mɛnt/

Noun

element m inan

  1. element (component, piece of a larger whole)
  2. (pejorative, dated) element (group of people)
    Wieczorami w knajpie zbierał się podejrzany element.
    In the evenings, suspicious element congregated in the pub.

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /elěment/
  • Hyphenation: e‧le‧ment

Noun

elèment m (Cyrillic spelling елѐмент)

  1. element

Declension


Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

element n

  1. element; basic building block of matter in ancient philosophy
  2. element; a place or state of being that an individual or object is better suited towards
  3. elements; forces of weather
  4. element; an object in a set
  5. (mathematics) element of a matrix
  6. heating element, radiator
  7. (computing) element; object in markup language

Declension

Inflection of element 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative element elementet element elementen
Genitive elements elementets elements elementens

Related terms


Turkish

Etymology

From German Element.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɛ.le.ˈment]
  • Hyphenation: e‧le‧ment

Noun

element (definite accusative elementi, plural elementler)

  1. (chemistry) element

Declension