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Webster 1913 Edition


Waster

Wast′er

,
Noun.
[OE.
wastour
, OF.
wasteor
,
gasteor
. See
Waste
,
Verb.
T.
]
1.
One who, or that which, wastes; one who squanders; one who consumes or expends extravagantly; a spendthrift; a prodigal.
He also that is slothful in his work is brother to him that is a great
waster
.
Prov. xviii. 9.
Sconces are great
wasters
of candles.
Swift.
2.
An imperfection in the wick of a candle, causing it to waste; – called also a
thief
.
Halliwell.
3.
A kind of cudgel; also, a blunt-edged sword used as a foil.
Half a dozen of veneys at
wasters
with a good fellow for a broken head.
Beau. & Fl.
Being unable to wield the intellectual arms of reason, they are fain to betake them unto
wasters
.
Sir T. Browne.

Webster 1828 Edition


Waster

WASTER

,
Noun.
1.
One who is prodigal; one who squanders property; one who consumes extravagantly or without use.
He also that is slothful in his work, is brother to him who is a great waster. Proverbs 18.
Sconces are great wasters of candles.
2.
A kind of cudgel.

Definition 2022


waster

waster

English

Noun

waster (plural wasters)

  1. Someone or something that wastes; someone who squanders or spends extravagantly.
  2. (dialectal) An imperfection in the wick of a candle, causing it to waste.
  3. A destroyer
Synonyms
  • See also Wikisaurus:spendthrift
Derived terms

Translations

Etymology 2

Origin unknown.

Noun

waster (plural wasters)

  1. (obsolete, chiefly fencing) A kind of cudgel; also, a blunt-edged sword used as a foil.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, II.3.6:
      Or, as they that play at wasters exercise themselves by a few cudgels how to avoid an enemy's blows, let us arm ourselves against all such violent incursions which may invade our minds.

Anagrams


Old French

Verb

waster

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of gaster
    • circa 1170, Wace, Le Roman de Rou:
      E li Paens ont tot wasté
      And the peasants destroyed everything

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-sts, *-stt are modified to z, st. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants

  • English: waste (borrowed)