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Webster 1913 Edition


Intuition

Inˊtu-i′tion

,
Noun.
[L.
intuitus
, p. p. of
intueri
to look on;
in-
in, on +
tueri
: cf. F.
intuition
. See
Tuition
.]
1.
A looking after; a regard to.
[Obs.]
What, no reflection on a reward! He might have an
intuition
at it, as the encouragement, though not the cause, of his pains.
Fuller.
2.
Direct apprehension or cognition; immediate knowledge, as in perception or consciousness; – distinguished from “mediate” knowledge, as in reasoning;
as, the mind knows by
intuition
that black is not white, that a circle is not a square, that three are more than two, etc.
; quick or ready insight or apprehension.
Sagacity and a nameless something more, – let us call it
intuition
.
Hawthorne.
3.
Any object or truth discerned by intuition.

Webster 1828 Edition


Intuition

INTUI'TION

,
Noun.
[L. intuitus, intueor; in and tueor.]
A looking on; a sight or view; but restricted to mental view or perception. Particularly and appropriately,the act by which the mind perceives the agreement or disagreement of two ideas, or the truth of things, immediately, or the moment they are presented, without the intervention of other ideas, or without reasoning and deduction.
We know by intuition, that a part is less than the whole.

Definition 2022


Intuition

Intuition

See also: intuition and intuïtion

German

Noun

Intuition f (genitive Intuition, plural Intuitionen)

  1. intuition

Declension

intuition

intuition

See also: Intuition and intuïtion

English

Alternative forms

Noun

intuition (plural intuitions)

  1. Immediate cognition without the use of conscious rational processes.
    • 1988, Andrew Radford, Transformational Grammar, Cambridge: University Press, ISBN 0-521-34750-5, page 4:
      The native speaker's grammatical competence is reflected in two types of
      intuition which speakers have about their native language(s) — (i) intuitions
      about sentence well-formedness, and (ii) intuitions about sentence structure.
      The word intuition is used here in a technical sense which has become stand-
      ardised in Linguistics: by saying that a native speaker has intuitions about the
      well-formedness and structure of sentences, all we are saying is that he has the
      ability to make judgments about whether a given sentence is well-formed or
      not, and about whether it has a particular structure or not. [...]
  2. A perceptive insight gained by the use of this faculty.

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • intuition in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • intuition in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Finnish

Noun

intuition

  1. Genitive singular form of intuitio.

Anagrams


French

Noun

intuition f (plural intuitions)

  1. intuition, hunch
  2. premonition