Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


So

So

,
adv.
[OE.
so
,
sa
,
swa
, AS.
swā
; akin to OFries,
sā
,
s[GREEK]
, D.
zoo
, OS. & OHG.
s[GREEK]
, G.
so
, Icel.
svā
,
sv[GREEK]
,
svo
,
so
, Sw.
s[GREEK]
, Dan.
saa
, Goth.
swa
so,
sw[GREEK]
as; cf. L.
suus
one’s own, Skr.
sva
one's own, one's self. √192. Cf. As,
Custom
,
Ethic
,
Idiom
,
Such
.]
1.
In that manner or degree;
as, indicated (in any way), or as implied, or as supposed to be known
.
Why is his chariot
so
long in coming?
Judges v. 28.
2.
In like manner or degree; in the same way; thus; for like reason; whith equal reason; – used correlatively, following as, to denote comparison or resemblance; sometimes, also, following inasmuch as.
As a war should be undertaken upon a just motive,
so
a prince ought to consider the condition he is in.
Swift.
3.
In such manner; to such degree; – used correlatively with as or that following;
as, he was
so
fortunate as to escape
.
I viewed in may mind,
so
far as I was able, the beginning and progress of a rising world.
T. Burnet.
He is very much in Sir Roger's esteem,
so
that he lives in the family rather as a relation than dependent.
Addison.
4.
Very; in a high degree; that is, in such a degree as can not well be expressed;
as, he is
so
good; he planned
so
wisely
.
5.
In the same manner; as has been stated or suggested; in this or that condition or state; under these circumstances; in this way; – with reflex reference to something just asserted or implied; used also with the verb to be, as a predicate.
Use him [your tutor] with great respect yourself, and cause all your family to do
so
too.
Locke.
It concerns every man, with the greatest seriousness, to inquire into those matters, whether they be
so
or not.
Tillotson.
He is Sir Robert's son, and
so
art thou.
Shakespeare
6.
The case being such; therefore; on this account; for this reason; on these terms; – used both as an adverb and a conjuction.
God makes him in his own image an intellectual creature, and
so
capable of dominion.
Locke.
Here, then, exchange we mutually forgiveness;
So may the guilt of all my broken vows,
My perjuries to thee, be all forgotten.
Rowe.
7.
It is well; let it be as it is, or let it come to pass; – used to express assent.
And when 't is writ, for my sake read it over,
And if it please you,
so
; if not, why,
so
.
Shakespeare
There is Percy; if your father will do me any honor,
so
; if not, let him kill the next Percy himself.
Shakespeare
8.
Well; the fact being as stated; – used as an expletive;
as,
so
the work is done, is it?
9.
Is it thus? do you mean what you say? – with an upward tone;
as, do you say he refuses?
So
?
[Colloq.]
10.
About the number, time, or quantity specified; thereabouts; more or less;
as, I will spend a week or
so
in the country; I have read only a page or
so
.
A week or
so
will probably reconcile us.
Gay.
☞ See the Note under
Ill
,
adv.
So
. . .
as
.
So is now commonly used as a demonstrative correlative of as when it is the puprpose to emphasize the equality or comparison suggested, esp. in negative assertions, and questions implying a negative answer. By Shakespeare and others so . . . as was much used where as . . . as is now common. See the Note under
As
, 1.

So
do,
as
thou hast said.
Gen. xviii. 5.
As
a flower of the field,
so
he flourisheth.
Ps. ciii. 15.
Had woman been
so
strong
as
men.
Shakespeare
No country suffered
so
much
as
England.
Macaulay.
So far
,
to that point or extent; in that particular.
“The song was moral, and so far was right.”
Cowper.
So far forth
,
as far; to such a degree.
Shak.
Bacon.
So forth
,
further in the same or similar manner; more of the same or a similar kind. See
And so forth
, under
And
.
So, so
,
well, well.
So, so, it works; now, mistress, sit you fast.”
Dryden.
Also, moderately or tolerably well; passably; as, he succeeded but so so.
“His leg is but so so.”
Shak.
So that
,
to the end that; in order that; with the effect or result that.
So then
,
thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is.

So

,
c
onj.
Provided that; on condition that; in case that; if.
Though all the winds of doctrine were let loose play upon the earth,
so
truth be in the field, we do injuriously, by licensing and prohibiting, to misdoubt her strength.
Milton.

So

,
int
erj.
Be as you are; stand still; stop; that will do; right as you are; – a word used esp. to cows; also used by sailors.

Webster 1828 Edition


So

SO

,
adv.
[L. sic, contracted. It is from some root signifying to set, to still, and this sense is retained in the use of the word by milkmaids, who say to cows, so, so, that is, stand still, remain as you are; and in this use, the word may be the original verb.]
1.
In like manner, answering to as, and noting comparison or resemblance; as with the people, so with the priest.
2.
In such a degree; to that degree. Why is his chariot so long in coming? Judges 5.
3.
In such a manner; sometimes repeated, so and so; as certain colors, mingled so and so.
4.
It is followed by as. There is something equivalent in France and Scotland; so as it is a hard calumny upon our soil to affirm that so excellent a fruit will not grow here. But in like phrases, we now use that; 'so that it is a hard calumny;' and this may be considered as the extablished usage.
5.
In the smae manner. Use your tutor with great respect, and cause all your family to do so too.
6.
Thus; in this manner; as New York so called from the duke of York. I know not why it is, but so it is. It concerns every man, with the greatest seriousness, to inquire whether theese thing are so or not.
7.
Therefore; thus; for this reason; in consequence of this or that. It leaves instruction, and so instructors, to the sobriety fo the settled articles of the church. God makes him in own image an intelectual creature, and so capable of dominion. This statute made the clipping of coin hign treason, which it was not at common law; so that this was an enlarging staute.
8.
On these terms, noting a conditional petition. Here then exchange we mutually forgiveness; SO may the guilt of all my broken vows, my perjuries to thee be all forgotten. So here might be expressed by thus, that is, in this manner, by this mutual forgiveness.
9.
Provided that; on condition that, [L. modo.] So the doctrine by but wholesome and edifying though there should be a want of exactness in the manner of speaking and resoning, it may be overlooked. I care not who furnishes the means, so they are furnished.
10.
In like manner, noting the concession of one proposition of fact and the assumption of another; answering to as. As a war should be undertaken upon a just motive, so a prince ought to consider the condition he is in when he enters on it.
11.
So often expresses the sense of a word or sentence going before. In this case it prevents a repetition, and may be considered as a substitute for the word or phrase. 'France is highly cultivated, but England is more so,' that is, more highly cultivated.
12.
Thus; thus it is; this is the state. How sorrow shakes him! So now the tempest tears him up by th' roots.
13.
Well; the fact being such. And so the work is done, is it?
14.
It is sometimes used to express a certain degree, implying comparison, and yet without the corresponding word as, to render the degree definite. An astringent is not quite so proper, where relaxing the urinary passages is necessary.
15.
It is sometimes equivalent to be it so, let it be so, let it be as it is, or in that manner. There is Percy; if your father will do me any honor, so; if not, let him kill the next Percy himself.
16.
It expresses a wish, desire or petition. Ready are the appellant and defendant- So please your highness to behold the fight.
17.
So much as, however much. Instead of so, we now generally use as; as much as, that much; whatever the quantity may be.
18.
So so, or so repeated, used as a kind of exclamation; equivalent to well, well; or it is so, the thing is done. So, so, it works; now, mistress, sit you fast.
19.
So so, much as it was; indifferently; not well not much amiss. His leg is but so so.
20.
So then, thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is. So then the Volscians stand; but as at first ready, when time shall prompt them, to make road upon's again.

Definition 2021


So

So

See also: Appendix:Variations of "so"

English

Abbreviation

So

  1. Alternative form of So.

Proper noun

So

  1. A Mon-Khmer-speaking people of Laos and Thailand.

Anagrams


Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Old High German saga, from Proto-Germanic *sagǭ. Cognate with German Sage, Dutch sage.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zoː/
    • Rhymes: -oː

Noun

So f (plural Soen)

  1. tale, story, legend, myth

Related terms


Tagalog

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɔ/

Etymology

Min Nan Hokkien (so͘).

Proper noun

So

  1. A surname of Chinese origin.

so

so

See also: Appendix:Variations of "so"

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: , IPA(key): /səʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /soʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • Homophones: sew, soh, sow, soy (some non-standard dialects)

Conjunction

so

  1. In order that.
    Eat your broccoli so you can have dessert.
  2. With the result that; for that reason; therefore.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Thinks I to myself, Sol, you're run off your course again. This is a rich man's summer cottage []. So I started to back away again into the bushes. But I hadn't backed more'n a couple of yards when I see something so amazing that I couldn't help scooching down behind the bayberries and looking at it.
    I was hungry so I asked if there was any more food.
    He ate too much cake, so he fell ill.
    He wanted a book, so he went to the library.
    “I need to go to the bathroom.”
    ―“So go!”
  3. (archaic) Provided that; on condition that, as long as.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essayes, London: Edward Blount, OCLC 946730821, II.18:
      As we cal money not onely that which is true and good, but also the false; so it be currant.
    • John Milton
      Though all the winds of doctrine were let loose play upon the earth, so truth be in the field, we do injuriously, by licensing and prohibiting, to misdoubt her strength.
Usage notes

Chiefly in North American use, a comma or pause is often used before the conjunction when used in the sense with the result that. (A similar meaning can often be achieved by using a semicolon or colon (without the so), as for example: He drank the poison; he died.)

Synonyms
Translations

Adverb

so (not comparable)

  1. To the (explicitly stated) extent that.
    It was so hot outside that all the plants died. He was so good, they hired him on the spot.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Thinks I to myself, Sol, you're run off your course again. This is a rich man's summer cottage []. So I started to back away again into the bushes. But I hadn't backed more'n a couple of yards when I see something so amazing that I couldn't help scooching down behind the bayberries and looking at it.
    • 1963, Mike Hawker, Ivor Raymonde (music and lyrics), Dusty Springfield (vocalist), I Only Want to Be with You (single),
      Don′t know what it is that makes me love you so, / I only know I never want to let you go.
  2. (informal) To the (implied) extent.
    I need a piece of cloth so long. [= this long]
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity:
      We drove back to the office with some concern on my part at the prospect of so large a case. Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke.
    • 2013 July 20, Old soldiers?”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      Whether modern, industrial man is less or more warlike than his hunter-gatherer ancestors is impossible to determine. The machine gun is so much more lethal than the bow and arrow that comparisons are meaningless.
    1. (informal) Very (positive clause).
      He is so good!
      • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
        Captain Edward Carlisle [] felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, []; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. He cursed the fate which had assigned such a duty, cursed especially that fate which forced a gallant soldier to meet so superb a woman as this under handicap so hard.
    2. (informal) Very (negative clause).
      It’s not so bad. [i.e. it's acceptable]
    3. (slang, chiefly US) Very much.
      But I so want to see the Queen when she visits our town! That is so not true!
      • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapter1:
        Molly the dairymaid came a little way from the rickyard, and said she would pluck the pigeon that very night after work. She was always ready to do anything for us boys; and we could never quite make out why they scolded her so for an idle hussy indoors. It seemed so unjust.
  3. In a particular manner.
    Place the napkin on the table just so. If that's what you mean, then say so; (or do so).
  4. In the same manner or to the same extent as aforementioned; also.
    Just as you have the right to your free speech, so I have the right to mine. Many people say she's pretty, but I don't think so. "I can count backwards from one hundred." "So can I."
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      "Good morrow to thee, jolly fellow," quoth Robin, "thou seemest happy this merry morn." ¶ "Ay, that am I," quoth the jolly Butcher, "and why should I not be so? Am I not hale in wind and limb? Have I not the bonniest lass in all Nottinghamshire? And lastly, am I not to be married to her on Thursday next in sweet Locksley Town?"
    • 2012 May 19, Paul Fletcher, Blackpool 1-2 West Ham”, in BBC Sport:
      It was a goal that meant West Ham won on their first appearance at Wembley in 31 years, in doing so becoming the first team since Leicester in 1996 to bounce straight back to the Premier League through the play-offs.
  5. (with as): To such an extent or degree; as.
    so far as; so long as; so much as
Usage notes
  • Use of so in the sense to the implied extent is discouraged in formal writing; spoken intonation which might render the usage clearer is not usually apparent to the reader, who might reasonably expect the extent to be made explicit. For example, the reader may expect He is so good to be followed by an explanation or consequence of how good he is. Devices such as use of underscoring and the exclamation mark may be used as a means of clarifying that the implicit usage is intended; capitalising SO is also used. The derivative subsenses very and very much are similarly more apparent with spoken exaggerated intonation.
  • The difference between so and very in implied-extent usage is that very is more descriptive or matter-of-fact, while so indicates more emotional involvement. This so is used by both men and women, but more frequently by women. For example, she is very pretty is a simple statement of fact; she is so pretty suggests admiration. Likewise, that is very typical is a simple statement; that is SO typical of him! is an indictment. A formal (and reserved) apology may be expressed I am very sorry, but after elbowing someone in the nose during a basketball game, a man might say, Dude, I am so sorry! in order to ensure that it's understood as an accident.[1]
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
References
  1. Mark Liberman, "Ask Language Log: So feminine?", 2012 March 26

Adjective

so (not comparable)

  1. True, accurate.
    That is so. You are responsible for this, is that not so?
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 29686887 , chapter IV:
      “My Continental prominence is improving,” I commented dryly. ¶ Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan. ¶ “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
  2. In that state or manner; with that attribute. (replaces the aforementioned adjective phrase)
    • 1823, Andrew Reed, Martha
      If this separation was painful to all parties, it was most so to Martha.
    • 1872, Charles Dickens, J., The Personal History of David Copperfield
      But if I had been more fit to be married, I might have made you more so too.
    • 1947, Liberty Hyde Bailey, The Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture
      It must be understood that while the nelumbiums are hardy, they are so only as long as the tubers are out of the reach of frost.
  3. (dated, Britain, slang) Homosexual.
    Is he so?
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

so

  1. Used after a pause for thought to introduce a new topic, question or story.
    So, let's go home.
    So, what'll you have?
    So, there was this squirrel stuck in the chimney...
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 11, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      So, after a spell, he decided to make the best of it and shoved us into the front parlor. 'Twas a dismal sort of place, with hair wreaths, and wax fruit, and tin lambrekins, and land knows what all.
  2. Short for so what
    "You park your car in front of my house every morning." — "So?"
  3. Be as you are; stand still; used especially to cows; also used by sailors.
Translations

Pronoun

so

  1. Abbreviation of someone.
Synonyms

Etymology 2

Shortened from sol, to make it an open syllable for uniformity with the rest of the scale.

Noun

so (plural sos)

  1. (music) A syllable used in solfège to represent the fifth note of a major scale.
Translations

Etymology 3

Borrowing from Japanese (so).

Noun

so (plural sos)

  1. (foods) A type of dairy product made in Japan between the seventh and 10th centuries.

See also

Wikimedia Commons has related media at:

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: are · their · one · #39: so · me · an · we

Anagrams


Asturian

Etymology 1

From Latin sub.

Preposition

so

  1. under
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Latin suus (his, her, its)

Adjective

so m sg (feminine singular so, neuter singular so, masculine plural sos, feminine plural sos)

  1. his, her, its
  2. your (polite)
  3. their

Pronoun

so

  1. his, hers
  2. yours (polite)

Related terms

Etymology 3

Alternative forms

Verb

so

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ser

Basque

Noun

so

  1. look

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin sonus.

Noun

so m (plural sons)

  1. sound

Derived terms


Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse sýr, from Proto-Germanic *sūz, from Proto-Indo-European *sū-.

Noun

so c (singular definite soen, plural indefinite søer)

  1. sow
  2. (pejorative) ****

Declension

References


Elfdalian

Etymology

From Old Norse svá, from Proto-Germanic *swa, *swē. Cognate with Swedish .

Adverb

so

  1. so, like that, in that manner
  2. so, to such a degree

Esperanto

Noun

so (accusative singular so-on, plural so-oj, accusative plural so-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter S/s.

See also


Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse svá, from Proto-Germanic *swa, *swē (so), from Proto-Indo-European *swē, *swō (reflexive pronomial stem).

Adverb

so

  1. so, thus, as
  2. then

Folopa

Alternative forms

Noun

so

  1. woman

References

  • Karl James Franklin, Pacific Linguistics (1973, ISBN 0858831007), page 130: Polopa so/sou woman, cf. DAR sou female animal but we woman.
  • Karl J. Franklin, Comparative Wordlist 1 of the Gulf District and adjacent areas (1975), page 15: Boro, Suri, Tebera sou, Sopese šo
  • Carol Anderson, Beginning Folopa Language Lessons and Simple Glossary (2010) (as so)

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin suus.

Pronoun

so (third-person singular possessive of masculine singular, of feminine singular , of masculine plural siei, of feminine plural sôs)

  1. (used attributively) his, her, its; of his, hers, its
  2. (used predicatively) his, hers, its
  3. (used substantively) his, hers, its; the thing belonging to him, her,it

See also


German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *swa, *swē, compare with Old Dutch so and Dutch zo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zoː/
  • Rhymes: -oː

Adverb

so

  1. so, that
    Die Leute sind so nett. ― People are so nice.
    Dieser Hammer ist nicht so gut. ― This hammer is not that good.
  2. as (followed by an adjective or adverb plus wie in a statement of equality)
    Er rennt so schnell wie der Blitz. ― He runs as fast as lightning.
  3. thus, like this/that, in this/that way, in this/that manner
    Wenn du den Ball so wirfst, triffst du die Zielscheibe.
    If you throw the ball like this, you'll hit the target.
  4. (colloquial) expletive; sometimes intensifying, sometimes with no noticeable meaning
    Wir sind runtergegangen und haben uns hier so hingesetzt.
    We went downstairs and, like, sat down here.

Derived terms

Conjunction

so

  1. (archaic) an, if
    So es Euch beliebt. ― If it please you.

Synonyms

Pronoun

so

  1. (obsolete, relative) that, which, who
    Derhalben sind die Christen schuldig, der Obrigkeit unterthan [] zu seyn in Allem, so ohne Sünde geschehen mag.
    That do the Christians owe: to be obedient to the authority [] in all that may be done without sin.
    (Augsburger Bekenntnis)

Synonyms


Gothic

Romanization

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐍉

Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sˠɔ/

Determiner

so

  1. Munster form of seo (used after a word ending in a velarized (“broad”) consonant)
    • 1938, Peig Sayers, “Inghean an Cheannaidhe”[1]:
      Ní raibh aoinne cloinne age n-a muinntir ach í agus do mhéaduigh sin uirrim agus grádh na ndaoine don inghean óg so.
      Her parents had no children but her, and that increased the esteem and love of the people for this young girl.

References

  1. M. L. Sjoestedt-Jonval, 1936, Description d’un parler irlandais de Kerry, Paris: Librairie Ancienne Honoré Champion, p. 193.

Italian

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes:

Verb

so

  1. first-person singular present indicative of sapere
    Non lo sai? ― Don't you know (it)?
    Non lo so ― I don't know (it).
    Lo so io! ― But I do (know it)!

Usage notes

Unlike English, Italian verb forms for first/second/third-person are different, rendering io (I) redundant, unless emphasis is required as shown in last example above.


Japanese

Romanization

so

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

Lojban

Lojban cardinal numbers
 <  bi so pano  > 
    Cardinal : so
    Ordinal : somai
    Adverbial : soroi
    Distributive : somei
    Quantified : somoi
    Higher-Order Ordinal : somo'o

Cmavo

so (rafsi soz)

  1. (cardinal) nine

Luxembourgish

Verb

so

  1. second-person singular imperative of soen

Middle Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch , from Proto-Germanic *swa.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zoː/

Adverb

  1. so, like that, in that manner
  2. so, to such a degree
  3. (so ... alse) as
  4. then, in that case
  5. so, therefore

Conjunction

  1. if, in the case that
  2. like, as
  3. (so ... so) both ... and

Descendants

  • Dutch: zo

Etymology 2

Weakened form of soe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zoː/, /zo/

Pronoun

  1. (chiefly East and West Flanders) Alternative form of si (feminine singular)

Molise Croatian

Etymology

From Serbo-Croatian so.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /so/

Noun

so m

  1. salt

Declension

References

  • Walter Breu and Giovanni Piccoli (2000), Dizionario croato molisano di Acquaviva Collecroce: Dizionario plurilingue della lingua slava della minoranza di provenienza dalmata di Acquaviva Collecroce in Provincia di Campobasso (Parte grammaticale).

Northern Sami

Etymology

Borrowing from Norwegian .

Adverb

so

  1. so, then, in that case
  2. so, to this or that extent

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • (main form)

Etymology

From Old Norse svá, from Proto-Germanic *swa.

Adverb

so (bracket form)

  1. so, that
    Eg visste ikkje at dei skulle vera so mange.
    I didn't know that they were going to be that many.

References


Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *swa.

Adverb

  1. so, like that, in that manner

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: so
    • Dutch: zo

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *so (this), from Proto-Indo-European *só.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /so/

Alternative forms

Determiner

so

  1. this (used after the noun, which is preceded by the definite article)
    ind epistil so ― this epistle

Derived terms

Descendants


Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *swa.

Adverb

  1. so, like that, in that manner

Pali

Alternative forms

Pronoun

so

  1. he

Romani

Adverb

so

  1. what

Rwanda-Rundi

Noun

so

  1. father

Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *solь, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂ls.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sôː/

Noun

 f (Cyrillic spelling со̑)

  1. (Bosnia, Serbia) salt

Declension


Slovak

Preposition

so (+ instrumental)

  1. with

Synonyms


Slovene

Verb

so

  1. third-person plural present tense form of biti.

Spanish

Etymology 1

From Latin sub.

Preposition

so

  1. under
Usage notes

So is very rare in modern Spanish, surviving only in certain expressions, including so pena de (on pain of, under penalty of), so pretexto de or so color de (under pretext of), a so capa (secretly, with bribery).

Pronoun

so

  1. you (emphatic, derogatory)
    • ¡So tonto! ― You blithering idiot!

Etymology 2

Borrowing from English so.

Interjection

so

  1. (US, Puerto Rico, El Salvador) so

Etymology 3

Interjection

so

  1. whoa!

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse sýr, from Proto-Germanic *sūz, from Proto-Indo-European *sū-.

Noun

so c

  1. (rare) sow, female pig

Synonyms

Declension

Inflection of so 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative so son sor sorna
Genitive sos sons sors sornas

Usage notes

  • The more common synonym is sugga, especially for the plural form.

Veps

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *soo.

Noun

so

  1. swamp, marsh, bog

Inflection

Inflection of so
nominative sing. so
genitive sing. son
partitive sing. sod
partitive plur. soid
singular plural
nominative so sod
accusative son sod
genitive son soiden
partitive sod soid
essive-instructive son soin
translative soks soikš
inessive sos soiš
elative sospäi soišpäi
illative ? soihe
adessive sol soil
ablative solpäi soilpäi
allative sole soile
abessive sota soita
comitative sonke soidenke
prolative sodme soidme
approximative I sonno soidenno
approximative II sonnoks soidennoks
egressive sonnopäi soidennopäi
terminative I ? soihesai
terminative II solesai soilesai
terminative III sossai
additive I ? soihepäi
additive II solepäi soilepäi

Derived terms

  • sohein
  • sokesk

References

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), болото”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika

Vietnamese

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Verb

so

  1. (transitive) to compare
    So với bạn thì nó cao hơn. ― Compared to his friend, he is taller.
  2. (transitive) to pair up
    so đũa ― to pair up chopsticks
  3. (intransitive) to straighten one's shoulders, as if to compare one's height to another's
Synonyms

Etymology 2

Compare  (, "first").

Adjective

so

  1. firstborn
    con so ― firstborn child
    chửa con so ― to be pregnant for the first time
    trứng gà so ― a chicken's first egg (usually a small egg)
Derived terms
  • con so

Volapük

Adverb

so

  1. so

Welsh

Verb

so

  1. (colloquial, South Wales) second-person singular present negative of bod
  2. (colloquial, South Wales) third-person singular present negative of bod
    So e’n credu. ― He doesn’t think so.
  3. (colloquial, South Wales) first-person plural present negative of bod
  4. (colloquial, South Wales) second-person plural present negative of bod
  5. (colloquial, South Wales) third-person plural present negative of bod

Usage notes

Unlike other negative verb forms, this form—and sa, which is used for the first-person singular—is not complemented by ddim after the subject.


Zulu

Pronoun

-so

  1. Combining stem of lona.

See also