Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Too

Too

,
adv.
[The same word as
to
, prep. See
To
.]
1.
Over; more than enough; – noting excess;
as, a thing is
too
long,
too
short, or
too
wide;
too
high;
too
many;
too
much
.
His will,
too
strong to bend,
too
proud to learn.
Cowley.
2.
Likewise; also; in addition.
An honest courtier, yet a patriot
too
.
Pope.
Let those eyes that view
The daring crime, behold the vengeance
too
.
Pope.
Too too
,
a duplication used to signify great excess.
O that this
too too
solid flesh would melt.
Shakespeare
Such is not Charles his
too too
active age.
Dryden.
Syn. – Also; likewise. See
Also
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Too

TOO

, adv.
1.
Over; more than enough; noting excess; as, a thing is too long, too short,or too wide; too high; too many; too much.
His will too strong to bend, too proud to learn.
2.
Likewise; also; in addition.
A courtier and a patriot too.
Let those eyes that view
The daring crime, behold the vengeance too.
3.
Too, too, repeated, denotes excess emphatically; but this repetition is not in respectable use.

Definition 2021


too

too

See also: tóo, to'o, тоо, Tōō, töö, and tʼóó

English

Adverb

too (not comparable)

  1. (focus) Likewise.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 16, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      The preposterous altruism too! [] Resist not evil. It is an insane immolation of self—as bad intrinsically as fakirs stabbing themselves or anchorites warping their spines in caves scarcely large enough for a fair-sized dog.
    • 2013 July 26, Leo Hickman, How algorithms rule the world”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 7, page 26:
      The use of algorithms in policing is one example of their increasing influence on our lives. And, as their ubiquity spreads, so too does the debate around whether we should allow ourselves to become so reliant on them – and who, if anyone, is policing their use.
  2. (conjunctive) Also; in addition.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapter1:
      They burned the old gun that used to stand in the dark corner up in the garret, close to the stuffed fox that always grinned so fiercely. Perhaps the reason why he seemed in such a ghastly rage was that he did not come by his death fairly. Otherwise his pelt would not have been so perfect. And why else was he put away up there out of sight?and so magnificent a brush as he had too.
    • 2013 July 19, Timothy Garton Ash, Where Dr Pangloss meets Machiavelli”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 18:
      Hidden behind thickets of acronyms and gorse bushes of detail, a new great game is under way across the globe. Some call it geoeconomics, but it's geopolitics too. The current power play consists of an extraordinary range of countries simultaneously sitting down to negotiate big free trade and investment agreements.
  3. (degree) To an excessive degree; over; more than enough.
    • 2013 August 3, Yesterday’s fuel”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      The dawn of the oil age was fairly recent. Although the stuff was used to waterproof boats in the Middle East 6,000 years ago, extracting it in earnest began only in 1859 after an oil strike in Pennsylvania. [] It was used to make kerosene, the main fuel for artificial lighting after overfishing led to a shortage of whale blubber. Other liquids produced in the refining process, too unstable or smoky for lamplight, were burned or dumped.
  4. (degree, colloquial) To a high degree, very.
    She doesn't talk too much. I'm not too sure about this.
  5. (affirmation, colloquial) Used to contradict a negative assertion.
    "You're not old enough yet."  "I am, too!"

Usage notes

  • When used in their senses as degree adverbs, very and too never modify verbs; very much and too much do instead.
  • It is unusual but not unheard of for too in its senses of "likewise" or "also" to begin a sentence; when it does, though, it is invariably followed by a comma.

Synonyms

Translations

See also

  • too too

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: well · many · work · #127: too · every · think · life

Anagrams


Acholi

Noun

too

  1. fox

Asturian

Determiner

too n

  1. neuter singular of tou

Galice

Noun

too

  1. water

Reference

  • Harry Hoijer, Galice Athapaskan: A Grammatical Sketch, International Journal of American Linguistics, volume 32:4 (October 1966), pages 320-327

Hiligaynon

Adjective

toó

  1. dexter, right

Komba

Noun

too

  1. water

Reference


Koyukon

Noun

too

  1. water
    • (Can we date this quote?), Melissa Axelrod, The semantic of time. Aspectual Categorization in Koyukon Athabaskan, page 167 (Extrait de l’histoire traditionnelle : Tobaan Etseh)
      "Tsookʼaał, nelo too gheebenee?" yełnee.

Sekani

Alternative forms

  • choo (in some other dialects)

Noun

too

  1. (Kwadacha dialect) water

References

  • Sharon Hargus, Documenting for revitalization: Kwadacha Tsek'ene, a case study (2014)