Definify.com

Webster 1828 Edition


Un

UN

, a prefix or inseparable preposition, un or on, usually un, an, is the same word as the L. in. It is a particle of negation, giving to words to which it is prefixed, a negative signification. We use un or in indifferently for this purpose; and the tendency of modern usage is to prefer the use of in, in some words, where un was formerly used. Un admits of no change of n into l, m or r, as in does, in illuminate, immense, irresolute. It is prefixed generally to adjectives and participles, and almost at pleasure. In a few instances, it is prefixed to verbs, as in unbend, unbind, unharness. As the compounds formed with un are so common and so well known, the composition is not noticed under the several words. For the etymologies, see the simple words.

Definition 2022


un

un

See also: Appendix:Variations of "un"

English

Alternative forms

Noun

un (plural uns)

  1. (dialectal) One.

Derived terms

Anagrams


Aromanian

Etymology

From Latin ūnus. Compare Daco-Romanian un.

Article

un (feminine unã)

  1. (indefinite article) a, an

Related terms


Asturian

Asturian cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : primeru

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin ūnus.

Numeral

un or unu m (feminine una)

  1. (cardinal) one

Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Brythonic *ʉn, from Proto-Celtic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Article

un

  1. a/an

See also


Catalan

Etymology

From Old Provençal un, from Latin ūnum (one), accusative form of ūnus (one), from Old Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /ˈun/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈun/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈun/
  • Rhymes: -un

Article

un m (feminine una, masculine plural uns, feminine plural unes)

  1. an; the indefinite article
  2. (in the plural) some

Usage notes

  • Unlike English, Catalan uses the indefinite article with plural nouns as well as singular nouns.
  • Catalan cardinal numbers may be used as masculine or feminine adjectives, except un/una (1), dos/dues (2), cents/centes (100s) and its compounds. When used as nouns, Catalan cardinal numbers are treated as masculine singular nouns in most contexts, but in expressions involving time such as la una i trenta (1:30) or les dues (two o'clock), they are feminine because the feminine noun hora has been elided.

Numeral

Catalan cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : primer
Catalan Wikipedia article on un

un m (feminine una, noun form u)

  1. (cardinal) one

Pronoun

un m sg (feminine una)

  1. one; indefinite pronoun

Chamorro

Etymology

Adjective and article from Spanish un.

Adjective

un

  1. one

Article

un

  1. a, an

Pronoun

un

  1. you (used in transitive sentences)
    Kao un taitai i lepblo-mu? ― Did you read your book?

Chuukese

Verb

un

  1. to drink

Dutch Low Saxon

Conjunction

un

  1. and

Fala

Etymology

From Old Portuguese un, from Latin ūnus (one), from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one; single).

Article

un m (plural un-os, feminine un-a, feminine plural un-as)

  1. a (masculine singular indefinite article)
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme I, Chapter 2: Númerus?:
      As lenguas, idiomas, dialectus o falas tenin un-as funciós mui claras desde o principiu dos siglu i si hai contabilizaus en o mundu un-as 8.000 lenguas, ca un-a con sua importancia numérica relativa, a nossa fala é un tesoiru mais entre elas.
      The tongues, languages or regional variants have some very clear functions since the beginning of the centuries and some 8,000 languages have been accounted for in the world, each with its relative numerical importance, our Fala is another treasure among them.

Numeral

un

  1. (cardinal) one (numerical value equal to 1)

Related terms

  • primeiru

French

Etymology

From Old French un, from Latin ūnum, accusative singular of ūnus (one), from Old Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /œ̃/

Article

un m (feminine une, plural des, negative de)

  1. an, a

Numeral

French cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : premier
French Wikipedia article on un

un

  1. one

Noun

un m (plural un)

  1. one

Pronoun

un m

  1. one

Anagrams


Friulian

Etymology

From Latin ūnus.

Article

un m (feminine une)

  1. a, an

Adjective

un

  1. one

Numeral

un (feminine une)

  1. (cardinal) one

Pronoun

un

  1. one

Related terms


Galician

Galician cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : primeiro
Galician Wikipedia article on un

Etymology

From Old Portuguese un, ũu, from Latin ūnus.

Pronunciation

Article

un m sg (feminine unha, masculine plural uns, feminine plural unhas)

  1. (indefinite) a, one

Usage notes

The article un and its inflected forms unha,uns, and unhas all form contractions with the prepositions con (with), de (of, from), and en (in).

Derived terms

Numeral

un m (feminine unha)

  1. (cardinal) one

Usage notes

The numeral un and its feminine form unha form contractions with the prepositions con (with), de (of, from), and en (in).

Derived terms


German Low German

Alternative forms

  • on (in Low Prussian and some other dialects)

Etymology

Ultimately cognate to German und.

Conjunction

un

  1. (in several dialects, including Hamburgisch and East Frisian) and
    Planten un Blomen ― plants and flowers

Hungarian

Etymology

Of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈun]

Verb

un

  1. (transitive) to be bored of, to be fed up with, to be tired of

Conjugation

Derived terms

(With verbal prefixes):


Ido

Ido cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : unesma
    Adverbial : unfoye
    Multiplier : unopla
    Fractional : unima
Ido Wikipedia article on un

Etymology

From French un, Spanish un, Italian un, all from Latin ūnus.

Numeral

un

  1. (cardinal) one (1)

Interlingua

Article

un

  1. an, a

Numeral

un

  1. one

Italian

Etymology

From uno, from Latin ūnus (one).

Article

un m (see uno)

  1. an, a

Noun

un m (see uno)

  1. one

Adjective

un m (see uno)

  1. one

Pronoun

un m (see uno)

  1. one

Anagrams


Japanese

Romanization

un

  1. rōmaji reading of うん

Ladin

Ladin cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : prim

Etymology

From Latin ūnus.

Adjective

un

  1. one

Noun

un m (uncountable)

  1. one

Latvian

Etymology

A borrowing from Middle Low German un (and). It replaced, in this sense, the particle ir (compare Lithuanian ir, which still has the sense of “and”). At first there were competing borrowings from other Germanic dialects (e.g. und, unde), and some forms were influenced by ir (resulting in ind, in), but from the 18th century on, the form un gradually became dominant.[1]

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ùn]

Conjunction

un

  1. additive conjunction used to link similar terms in a clause; and
    Didzis un Ilga apstājās ― Didzis and Ilga stopped
    tas ir skaists un dārgs ― this is beautiful and expensive
    tēvs strādā un domā ― father is working and thinking
  2. used to link clauses within a sentence; and
    Lupatu Zeta smējās tik sirsnīgi, ka asaras sakāpa acīs un pat Lupats pieliecās klausīties ― Lupatu Zeta laughed so heartily that tears filled her eyes and even Lupats leaned forward to listen
    pie tēva vīri atnāk uz runāšanu... Annelei patīk skatīties, kādi tie vīri un kā viņi runā ― (some) men came to father to talk... Annele liked to look what those men looked like and how they spoke
  3. used to link two independent clauses, indicating simultaneity, sequence, contrast, opposition, or comparison between them; and
    uzlec saule, un sākas jauna diena ― the sun rises, and a new day begins
    Annele papurināja smiedamās galvu, un visi lakati bija atkal nost ― Annele shook her head, laughing, and all scarves were (= fell) off once more
    Ansis bija noliesējis gluži dzeltenīgs, nomocījis, un tomēr viņa acīs bija arī līksmība ― Ansis had lost weight, grown rather yellow, (he looked) run down, and yet in his eyes there was also joy
    pavasarī viņam palika pieci gadi, un tas jau bija diezgan cienījams vecums ― in spring he became five years (old), and that was already quite a respectable age
  4. used to introduce an independent clause, linking it to the preceding context
    mātei varēja stāstīt visu... vai tiešām visu? un Ģirts atskārta, ka pēdējā laikā noticis daudz kas tāds, par ko viņš tomēr nestāstīs mātei... ― mother might tell everything... really everything? and Ģirts realized that recently many things had happened that he wouldn't tell mother...
    atceries, cik Latvijā šis vārds skanēja noslēpumaini un vilinoši: Kalifornija! un tagad ļoti labvēlīgs liktenis tevi iespēlējis tieši teiksmainajā Kalifornijā ― remember how in Latvia this word sounds mysterious and tempting: California! and now a very favorable fate has brought you to legendary California

References

  1. Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), un”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN 9984-700-12-7

Louisiana Creole French

Numeral

un

  1. (cardinal) one

Luxembourgish

Alternative forms

  • u (used before consonants other than d, h, n, t, z)

Etymology

From Old High German ana. The form is phonetically regular through the developments -a--ue- in originally open syllables, and -ue--u- before nasals.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /un/

Preposition

un (+ dative or accusative)

  1. on; at; to
    D’Biller hänken un der Wand.
    The pictures hang on the wall.

Middle French

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old French un, from Latin ūnus (one).

Article

un

  1. a, an

Numeral

un (invariable)

  1. (cardinal) one

Descendants

  • French: un

Mirandese

Article

un m (feminine ua)

  1. a, an

Norman

Alternative forms

  • iun (Guernsey)

Etymology

From Old French uns, from Latin ūnus (one).

Pronunciation

Article

un m

  1. a / an (masculine indefinite article)

Coordinate terms

  • (gender): eune
  • (definiteness):

Numeral

un m (feminine ieune)

  1. (Jersey, cardinal) one

Novial

Novial cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : unesmi

Numeral

un

  1. (cardinal) one



Occitan

Etymology

From Old Provençal un, from Latin ūnus (one).

Article

un m (feminine una)

  1. a, an (masculine singular indefinite article)

Old French

Etymology

From Latin ūnum, accusative singular of ūnus (one).

Article

un

  1. a, an (masculine oblique singular indefinite article)
  2. a, an (masculine nominative plural indefinite article)

Numeral

un

  1. (cardinal) one

Declension


Old Portuguese

Article

un

  1. Alternative form of ũu

Palikur

Noun

un n

  1. water

References

  • Languages of the Amazon (2012, ISBN 0199593566)

Papiamentu

Papiamentu cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un

Numeral

un

  1. (cardinal) one (1)

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

Cognate to German und, English and.

Conjunction

un

  1. and

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin ūnus, from Old Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Alternative forms

  • (Moldavian) ун (un)

Article

un (masculine and neuter indefinite article, feminine o)

  1. a, an

Usage notes

un is also used as a cardinal number (see unu and una).

O is used for feminine nouns:

un bărbat - a man (masculine)
un vis - a dream (neuter)
o femeie - a woman (feminine)

Related terms

  • unu (used as a numeral/cardinal number)
  • unul (used as an indefinite pronoun)

See also

indefinite article forms singular plural
m, n f
nom/acc un o niște
gen/dat unui unei unor

Saterland Frisian

Etymology

Compare German und

Conjunction

un

  1. and

Serbo-Croatian

Numeral

un

  1. (Chakavian, cardinal) one (1)

Synonyms


Sicilian

Etymology

From unu, from Latin ūnus.

Article

un m sg

  1. (indefinite) a, an

See also

Sicilian articles
Masculine Feminine
indefinite singular un, nu na
definite singular lu, û la, â
definite plural li, î li, î

Usage notes

Un is never used before words starting with the letter z or s and a consonant, like the Italian un


Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *onъ.

Determiner

un

  1. (regional) that

Spanish

Etymology

From uno, from Latin ūnus.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -un

Adjective

un m (apocopate, standard form uno)

  1. (before the noun) apocopic form of uno one

Usage notes

The form un is only used before and within the noun phrase of the masculine singular noun that it modifies. In other positions, uno is used instead.

Article

un m (indefinite, plural unos, feminine una, feminine plural unas)

  1. a

Tatar

Numeral

un (Cyrillic spelling ун)

  1. (cardinal) ten

Turkish

Etymology

From Old Turkic [script needed] (un), from Proto-Turkic *hūn.

Noun

un (definite accusative unu, plural unlar)

  1. flour

Declension


Venetian

Alternative forms

  • on (rural areas)

Etymology

From Latin ūnus.

Article

un m (feminine na)

  1. masculine singular indefinite article; a / an

See also

Venetian articles (edit)
m sg f sg m pl f pl
Definite articles
(the)
el / al (Belluno)
l' (before vowels)
la
l' (mandatory before a, optional before other vowels)
i le / 'e (Padua)
Indefinite articles
(a / an)
un / on (rural) na - -

Welsh

Welsh cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : cyntaf
    Adverbial : unwaith
Welsh Wikipedia article on un

Etymology

From Proto-Brythonic *ʉn, from Proto-Celtic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation

Adjective

un

  1. only

Numeral

un

  1. one

Noun

un m (plural unau)

  1. one, individual

Related terms

  • dim un (none)
  • pob un (each)
  • -yn

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
un unchanged unchanged hun
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References