Definify.com

Definition 2022


Es

Es

See also: Appendix:Variations of "es"

Translingual

Symbol

Es

  1. (chemistry) Symbol for einsteinium.
  2. (metrology) Symbol for the exasecond, an SI unit of time equal to 1018 seconds.

English

Noun

Es

  1. plural of E

Usage notes

  • There is some difference of opinion regarding the use of apostrophes in the pluralization of references to letters as symbols. New Fowler's Modern English Usage, after noting that the usage has changed, states on page 602 that "after letters an apostrophe is obligatory." The 15th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style states in paragraph 7.16, "To avoid confusion, lowercase letters ... form the plural with an apostrophe and an s". The Oxford Style Manual on page 116 advocates the use of common sense.

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɛs]

Etymology 1

Used by Freud as a noun, from the pronoun es (it).

Noun

Es n (genitive Es, plural Es)

  1. (psychology) id

Declension

Descendants

  • Czech: id (via loan-translation into Latin)
  • Danish: id (via loan-translation into Latin)
  • English: id (via loan-translation into Latin)

Etymology 2

Musical note.

Noun

Es n (genitive Es, plural Es)

  1. (music) E-flat

es

es

See also: Appendix:Variations of "es"

Translingual

Symbol

es

  1. ISO abbreviation language code for Spanish language (ISO 639-1).
  2. ISO abbreviation country code for Spain (ISO 3166-1 Alpha-2 code).
  3. (radio slang) a synonym for "and"
    WX HR COLD ES RAINY
    The weather here is cold & rainy.

English

Noun

es (plural esses)

  1. Alternative form of s (letter 's')

Etymology 2

e + -s.

Noun

es

  1. plural of e
Usage notes
  • There is some difference of opinion regarding the use of apostrophes in the pluralization of references to letters as symbols. New Fowler's Modern English Usage, after noting that the usage has changed, states on page 602 that "after letters an apostrophe is obligatory." The 15th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style states in paragraph 7.16, "To avoid confusion, lowercase letters ... form the plural with an apostrophe and an s". The Oxford Style Manual on page 116 advocates the use of common sense.

Etymology 3

Verb

es (be)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of is.

Anagrams


Alemannic German

Pronunciation

  • (Zurich) IPA(key): /əs/, /ɛs/

Article

es n

  1. (indefinite) a/an
    • 1978, Rolf Lyssy & Christa Maerker, Die Schweizermacher (transcript):
      Das isch September vor eme Jar gsi.

Declension

Declension of en
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative/accusative en e es -
dative emene enere emene -
  • Short forms of the dative – eme, ere, eme – are also common.

Pronoun

es n

  1. (personal) it

Declension


Arin

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Yeniseian *ʔes (God, sky). Compare - ēš, (God, sky), Assan aš-parán (sky); ös, (God); öš, (God, sky) and Pumpokol (sky).

Noun

es

  1. God
  2. sky

Aromanian

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin exeō. Compare Daco-Romanian ieși, ies.

Verb

es (third-person singular present indicative easi/ease, past participle ishitã)

  1. I leave, exit, go out.
  2. (of the sun, moon) rise
  3. (figuratively) I defecate.

Related terms

  • ishiri/ishire
  • ishit
  • ishitã
  • ishitor

See also


Assan

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Yeniseian *ʔes (God, sky). Compare Kott ēš, (God, sky), Arin (God, sky) and Pumpokol (sky).

Noun

es

  1. God

Synonyms


Bavarian

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /es/, [es]

Pronoun

es

  1. they

Catalan

Etymology 1

From Latin

Pronoun

es (proclitic, contracted s', enclitic se, contracted enclitic 's)

  1. himself, herself, itself (direct or indirect object)
  2. oneself (direct or indirect object)
  3. themselves (direct or indirect object)
  4. each other (direct or indirect object)
Declension

Etymology 2

From Latin ipse.

Alternative forms

Article

es m sg (feminine sa, masculine plural es, masculine plural sos, feminine plural ses)

  1. (Balearics) the
Usage notes
  • In Balearic Catalan, es contrasts with el as an obviative article, but is often used in first instance.

Czech

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛs/

Noun

es n

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter S/s.
See also

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛs/

Noun

es

  1. genitive singular of eso
  2. nominative plural of eso
  3. accusative plural of eso
  4. vocative plural of eso

Danish

Noun

es n (singular definite esset, plural indefinite esser)

  1. (card games) ace
    Jeg har alle esserne.
    I have all the aces.

Declension

See also

  • være i sit es

Dutch

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *askaz, *askiz (compare West Frisian esk, English ash, German Esche, Danish ask), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃osk- (compare Welsh onnen, Latin ornus (wild mountain ash), Lithuanian úosis, Russian ясень (jasenʹ), Albanian ah (beech), Ancient Greek ὀξύα (oxúa, beech), Old Armenian հացի (hacʿi)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Noun

es m (plural essen, diminutive esje n)

  1. ash, ash tree

Etymology 2

Noun

es m (plural essen, diminutive esje n)

  1. (music) E-flat

Etymology 3

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /əs/

Adverb

es

  1. (informal, dialectal) Elision of eens
    Kom es hierKom eens hier — Come over here (for a second).

Finnish

Noun

es

  1. (music) E-flat

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ/

Verb

es

  1. second-person singular present indicative of être

Anagrams


Fuyug

Noun

es (plural esing)

  1. child

References

  • Robert L. Bradshaw, Fuyug grammar sketch (2007)

Galician

Verb

es

  1. second-person singular present indicative of ser

German

Alternative forms

  • 's (chiefly informal or poetic)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [əs] (generally)
  • IPA(key): [əs], [ɛs], [eːs] (when stressed, which is rare)

Pronoun

es n

  1. it (referring to things)
  2. he (with reference to male creatures, people etc. that are grammatically neuter)
  3. she (with reference to female creatures, people etc. that are grammatically neuter)
    • 1952, Marie Luise Kaschnitz, ‘Das Dicke Kind’:
      Das Kind sagte nichts und sah mich mit seinen kühlen Augen an. Dann war es fort.
      The child said nothing and looked at me with her cold eyes. Then she was gone.
  4. (for impersonal verbs) it
    Es regnet.
    It’s raining.

Inflection

1Often capitalized, especially in letters

Usage notes

  • In the colloquial speech of some areas, this pronoun is fully replaced with the demonstrative pronoun das, with which it shares the unstressed reduction /s/. This reflects a similar development for sie/die, but predates it.

Derived terms

  • Es
  • -'s
  • by the German spelling reform of 1996: gehts, nimms, wenns

Article

es n

  1. (regional, colloquial) Alternative form of das
    Soll ich es Fenster zumachen?
    Should I close the window?

Usage notes

  • The contracted form 's is more common, but es is also frequently heard.

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛːs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛːs

Noun

es n (genitive singular ess, nominative plural es)

  1. (music) E flat

Declension

Related terms


Ido

Verb

es

  1. apocopic form of esas
    Me es hike pro il es hike.
    I am here because he is here.

Indonesian

Etymology

Borrowing from Dutch ijs.

Noun

es

  1. ice

Interlingua

Verb

es

  1. present indicative of esser: is, are, am

Latin

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

Noun

es (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter S.
Usage notes
  • Multiple Latin names for the letter S, s have been suggested. The most common is es or a syllabic s, although there is some evidence which also supports, as names for the letter, , sss, əs, , and even (in the fourth- or fifth-century first Antinoë papyrus, which gives Greek transliterations of the Latin names of the Roman alphabet’s letters) ισσε (isse).
Coordinate terms

References

  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), “es”, in Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book, London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) what country do you come from: cuias es
    • (ambiguous) how old are you: quot annos natus es?
    • (ambiguous) how old are you: qua aetate es?
    • (ambiguous) are you in your right mind: satin (= satisne) sanus es?
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), especially pages 30–31, 42–44, and 63

Etymology 2

Form of the verb sum (am).

Pronunciation

Verb

es

  1. second-person singular present active indicative of sum
  2. second-person singular present active imperative of sum

Quotations

  • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:es.

Etymology 3

Form of the verb edō (I eat).

Pronunciation

Verb

ēs

  1. second-person singular present active indicative of edō
  2. second-person singular present active imperative of edō
Synonyms

Latvian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Baltic *ež, from Proto-Indo-European *eǵ (from *éǵh₂). The non-nominative forms derive from Proto-Indo-European dependent stem *me- (the a instead of e in the Baltic languages appears to result from Iranian influence): reduplicated *me-me-*meneProto-Baltic genitive/accusative *mane*manen (by analogy with other accusatives) → *manens (by analogy with other genitives) → genitive manis, while *manen → accusative mani. Dative man comes from an older *mani. Instrumental variant manim imitates the nominal i-stem paradigm. Cognates include Lithuanian (archaic ), Old Prussian es, as, Sudovian as, Proto-Slavic *(j)azъ (Old Church Slavonic азъ (azŭ), Old East Slavic ꙗзъ (jazŭ), Russian, Belarusian, Ukrainian я (ja), Bulgarian аз (az), Czech (from jaz), Polish ja (from jaz)), Proto-Germanic *ekan, *ek (Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik), Old Norse ek, Old High German ih, German ich, Old English ic, English I), Hittite uk, Sanskrit अहम् (ahám), Avestan [script needed] (azəm), Ancient Greek ἐγώ (egṓ), Latin ego, Ossetian æз (æz).[1]

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɛs]

Pronoun

es (personal, 1st person singular)

  1. I; first person pronoun, referring to the speaker
    Es te dzīvoju.I live here.
    Viņš mani sastapa ceļā. ― He met me on the road.
    Atnāc pie manis! ― Come to me (to my place)!
    Nāc ar mani dejot! ― Come dance with me!
    Man nav laiks.I don't have time. (lit. There is no time to me.)
Declension
Usage notes

The form mans is a possessive pronoun ('my'), while manis is a true genitive form ('of me'). The dative form manim is used only optionally, with prepositions.

Related terms
  • manējs
See also

Noun

es m (invariable)

  1. I, ego (the essence of a person)
    mans es ― my I, my ego
    Runātājs izcēla savu es. ― The speaker highlighted his I, his ego.
    Briesmīgi nezināt nekā un just tikai sevi, savu es. ― It is terrible to know and feel nothing except oneself, one's I.
    Cilvēks var pierādīt savu vērtību, apliecināt savu “es” tikai darbā. ― A person can prove their worth, testify their “I”, only in (their) work.

Etymology 2

A cross-linguistically frequent way of naming this sound, and the respective letter.

Noun

es m (invariable)

  1. The Latvian name of the Latin script letter S/s.
See also

References

  1. Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), es”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN 9984-700-12-7

Middle French

Etymology 1

Old French es ("[you] are").

Verb

es

  1. second-person singular present indicative of estre

Etymology 2

Old French es ("in the").

Contraction

es

  1. Contraction of en + les.

Middle Irish

Noun

es f

  1. stoat, weasel
Descendants

Mutation

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
es unchanged n-es
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Novial

Verb

es

  1. be/am/is/are
  2. (auxiliary) Used with a passive participle of a verb in order to denote that verb's passive voice, specifically the "passive of being" voice.

See also


Ojibwe

Etymology

From Proto-Algonquian *e·hsa.

Noun

es (plural esag)

  1. shell (2)
  2. oyster

Old French

Etymology

Contraction of en les.

Preposition

es

  1. in the
    • 1303, Bernard de Gordon, Fleur de lis de medecine (a.k.a. lilium medicine), page 186 of this essay:
      l'autre partie va es muscules
      the other part goes into the muscles

Descendants

  • French: ès (archaic)

Old Irish

Etymology 1

Noun

es ?

  1. the letter s

Etymology 2

Conjunction

es

  1. (rare) Alternative form of is (and)

Etymology 3

Noun

es m

  1. cataract, rapid; a rapidly flowing stream
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms
Derived terms
Descendants

Etymology 4

Noun

es n

  1. vessel
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms

Etymology 5

Noun

es ?

  1. death
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms

Etymology 6

Noun

es ?

  1. food
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 7

Noun

es ?

  1. ox
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms

Etymology 8

Non-lemma forms.

Pronoun

es

  1. third-person singular masculine of a
Alternative forms

Mutation

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
es unchanged n-es
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Romagnol

Etymology

From Latin esse, present active infinitive of sum.

Verb

es

  1. to be
  2. (auxiliary, used to form composite past tense of many intransitive verbs) to have (done something).

Sawi

Interjection

es

  1. at once
    Uvur haramavimaken, du famud, es! — The tide is about to turn; cook the sago at once![1]
  2. enough

References

  1. Don Richardson, Peace Child.

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin est, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /es/, [e̞s]

Verb

es

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of ser.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of ser; (he/she/it/one) is

See also


Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɛs]

Verb

es

  1. (colloquial) first-person singular preterite of mynd

Synonyms