Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Rise

Rise

(rīz)
,
Verb.
I.
[
imp.
Rose
(rōz)
;
p. p.
Risen
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Rising
.]
[AS.
rīsan
; akin to OS.
rīsan
, D.
rijzen
, OHG.
rīsan
to rise, fall, Icel.
rīsa
, Goth. ur
reisan
, G.
reise
journey. CF.
Arise
,
Raise
,
Rear
,
Verb.
]
1.
To move from a lower position to a higher; to ascend; to mount up. Specifically: –
(a)
To go upward by walking, climbing, flying, or any other voluntary motion;
as, a bird
rises
in the air; a fish
rises
to the bait
.
(b)
To ascend or float in a fluid, as gases or vapors in air, cork in water, and the like.
(c)
To move upward under the influence of a projecting force;
as, a bullet
rises
in the air
.
(d)
To grow upward; to attain a certain height;
as, this elm
rises
to the height of seventy feet
.
(e)
To reach a higher level by increase of quantity or bulk; to swell;
as, a river
rises
in its bed; the mercury
rises
in the thermometer
.
(f)
To become erect; to assume an upright position;
as, to
rise
from a chair or from a fall
.
(g)
To leave one’s bed; to arise;
as, to
rise
early
.
He that would thrive, must
rise
by five.
Old Proverb.
(h)
To tower up; to be heaved up;
as, the Alps
rise
far above the sea
.
(i)
To slope upward; as, a path, a line, or surface rises in this direction.
“A rising ground.”
Dryden.
(j)
To retire; to give up a siege.
He,
rising
with small honor from Gunza, . . . was gone.
Knolles.
(k)
To swell or puff up in the process of fermentation; to become light, as dough, and the like.
2.
To have the aspect or the effect of rising.
Specifically: –
(a)
To appear above the horizont, as the sun, moon, stars, and the like.
“He maketh his sun to rise on the evil and the good.”
Matt. v. 45.
(b)
To become apparent; to emerge into sight; to come forth; to appear;
as, an eruption
rises
on the skin; the land
rises
to view to one sailing toward the shore
.
(c)
To become perceptible to other senses than sight;
as, a noise
rose
on the air; odor
rises
from the flower
.
(d)
To have a beginning; to proceed; to originate;
as, rivers
rise
in lakes or springs
.
A scepter shall
rise
out of Israel.
Num. xxiv. 17.
Honor and shame from no condition
rise
.
Pope.
3.
To increase in size, force, or value; to proceed toward a climax.
Specifically: –
(a)
To increase in power or fury; – said of wind or a storm, and hence, of passion.
“High winde . . . began to rise, high passions – anger, hate.”
Milton.
(b)
To become of higher value; to increase in price.
Bullion is
risen
to six shillings . . . the ounce.
Locke.
(c)
To become larger; to swell; – said of a boil, tumor, and the like.
(d)
To increase in intensity; – said of heat.
(e)
To become louder, or higher in pitch, as the voice.
(f)
To increase in amount; to enlarge;
as, his expenses
rose
beyond his expectations
.
4.
In various figurative senses.
Specifically: –
(a)
To become excited, opposed, or hostile; to go to war; to take up arms; to rebel.
At our heels all hell should
rise

With blackest insurrection.
Milton.
No more shall nation against nation
rise
.
Pope.
(b)
To attain to a better social position; to be promoted; to excel; to succeed.
Some
rise
by sin, and some by virtue fall.
Shakespeare
(c)
To become more and more dignified or forcible; to increase in interest or power; – said of style, thought, or discourse;
as, to
rise
in force of expression; to
rise
in eloquence; a story
rises
in interest
.
(d)
To come to mind; to be suggested; to occur.
A thought
rose
in me, which often perplexes men of contemplative natures.
Spectator.
(e)
To come; to offer itself.
There chanced to the prince's hand to
rise

An ancient book
.
Spenser.
5.
To ascend from the grave; to come to life.
But now is Christ
risen
from the dead.
1. Cor. xv. 20.
6.
To terminate an official sitting; to adjourn;
as, the committee
rose
after agreeing to the report
.
It was near nine . . . before the House
rose
.
Macaulay.
7.
To ascend on a musical scale; to take a higher pith;
as, to
rise
a tone or semitone
.
8.
(Print.)
To be lifted, or to admit of being lifted, from the imposing stone without dropping any of the type; – said of a form.
Syn. – To arise; mount; ascend; climb; scale.
Rise
,
Appreciate
. Some in America use the word appreciate for “rise in value;” as, stocks appreciate, money appreciates, etc. This use is not unknown in England, but it is less common there. It is undesirable, because rise sufficiently expresses the idea, and appreciate has its own distinctive meaning, which ought not to be confused with one so entirely different.

Rise

,
Noun.
1.
The act of rising, or the state of being risen.
2.
The distance through which anything rises;
as, the
rise
of the thermometer was ten degrees; the
rise
of the river was six feet; the
rise
of an arch or of a step
.
3.
Land which is somewhat higher than the rest;
as, the house stood on a
rise
of land
.
[Colloq.]
4.
Spring; source; origin;
as, the
rise
of a stream
.
All wickednes taketh its
rise
from the heart.
R. Nelson.
5.
Appearance above the horizon;
as, the
rise
of the sun or of a planet
.
Shak.
6.
Increase; advance; augmentation, as of price, value, rank, property, fame, and the like.
The
rise
or fall that may happen in his constant revenue by a Spanish war.
Sir W. Temple.
7.
Increase of sound; a swelling of the voice.
The ordinary
rises
and falls of the voice.
Bacon.
8.
Elevation or ascent of the voice; upward change of key;
as, a
rise
of a tone or semitone
.
9.
The spring of a fish to seize food (as a fly) near the surface of the water.

Webster 1828 Edition


Rise

RISE

,
Verb.
I.
rize. pret. rose; pp. risen; pron. rose, rizn. [See Raise.]
1.
To move to pass upward in any manner; to ascend; as, a fog rises from a river or from low ground; a fish rises in water; fowls rise in the air; clouds rise from the horizon towards the meridian; a balloon rises above the clouds.
2.
To get up; to leave the place of sleep or rest; as, to rise from bed.
3.
To get up or move from any recumbent to an erect posture; as, to rise after a fall.
4.
To get up from a seat; to leave a sitting posture; as, to rise from a sofa or chair.
5.
To spring; to grow; as a plant; hence, to be high or tall. A tree rises to the height of 60 feet.
6.
To swell in quantity or extent; to be more elevated; as, a river rises after a rain.
7.
To break forth; to appear; as, a boil rises on the skin.
8.
To appear above the horizon; to shine; as, the sun or a star rises.
He maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good. Matt. 5.
9.
To begin to exist; to originate; to come into being or notice. Great evils sometimes rise from small imprudences.
10.
To be excited; to begin to move or act; as, the wind rose at 12 o'clock.
11.
To increase in violence. The wind continued to rise till 3 o'clock.
12.
To appear in view; as, to rise up to the reader's view.
13.
To appear in sight; also, to appear more elevated; as in sailing towards a shore, the land rises.
14.
To change a station; to leave a place; as, to rise from a siege.
15.
To spring; to be excited or produced. A thought now rises in my mind.
16.
To gain elevation in rank, fortune or public estimation; to be promoted. Men may rise by industry, by merit, by favor, or by intrigue.
Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.
When the wicked rise, men hide themselves. Prov. 28.
17.
To break forth into public commotions; to make open opposition to government; or to assemble and oppose government; or to assemble in arms for attacking another nation. The Greeks have risen against their oppressors.
No more shall nation against nation rise.
18.
To be excited or roused into action.
Rise up to the battle. Jer. 49.
19.
To make a hostile attack; as when a man riseth against his neighbor. Deut. 22.
Also, to rebel. 2Sam. 18.
20.
To increase; to swell; to grow more or greater. A voice, feeble at first, rises to thunder. The price of good rises. The heat rises to intensity.
21.
To be improved; to recover from depression; as, a family may rise after misfortune to opulence and splendor.
22.
To elevate the style or manner; as, to rise in force of expression; to rise in eloquence.
23.
To be revived from death.
The dead in Christ shall rise first. 1Thess. 4.
24.
To come by chance.
25.
To ascend; to be elevated above the level or surface; as, the ground rises gradually one hundred yards. The Andes rise more than 20,000 feet above the level of the ocean; a mountain in Asia is said to rise still higher.
26.
To proceed from.
A scepter shall rise out of Israel. Numbers 24.
27.
To have its sources in. Rivers rise in lakes, ponds and springs.
28.
To be moved, roused, excited, kindled or inflamed, as passion. His wrath rose to rage.
29.
To ascend in the diatonic scale; as, to rise a tone or semitone.
30.
To amount. The public debt rises to a hundred million.
31.
To close a session. We say, congress will rise on the 4th of March; the legislature or the court will rise on a certain day.
This verb is written also arise, which see. In general, it is indifferent which orthography is used; but custom has, in some cases, established one to the exclusion of the other. Thus we never say, the price of goods arises, when we mean advanced, but we always say, the price rises. We never say, the ground arises to a certain altitude, and rarely, a man arises into an office or station. It is hardly possible to class or define the cases in which usage has established a difference in the orthography of this verb.

RISE

,
Noun.
rise.
1.
The act of rising, either in a literal or figurative sense; ascent; as the rise of vapor in the air; the rise of mercury in the barometer; the rise of water in a river.
2.
The act of springing or mounting from the ground; as the rise of the feet in leaping.
3.
Ascent; elevation, or degree of ascent; as the rise of a hill or mountain.
4.
Spring; source; origin; as the rise of a stream in a mountain. All sin has its rise in the heart.
5.
Any place elevated above the common level; as a rise of land.
6.
Appearance above the horizon; as the rise of the sun or a star.
7.
Increase; advance; as a rise in the price of wheat.
8.
Advance in rank, honor, property or fame. Observe a man after his rise to office, or a family after its rise from obscurity.
9.
Increase of sound on the same key; a swelling of the voice.
10.
Elevation or ascent of the voice in the diatonic scale; as a rise of a tone or semitone.
11.
Increase; augmentation.
12.
A bough or branch. [Not in use.]

Definition 2022


rise

rise

See also: říše

English

Verb

rise (third-person singular simple present rises, present participle rising, simple past rose, past participle risen)

  1. (intransitive) To move, or appear to move, physically upwards relative to the ground.
    1. To move upwards.
      We watched the balloon rise.
    2. To grow upward; to attain a certain height.
      This elm tree rises to a height of seventy feet.
    3. To slope upward.
      The path rises as you approach the foot of the hill.
    4. (of a celestial body) To appear to move upwards from behind the horizon of a planet as a result of the planet's rotation.
      • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet, Chapter 4,
        And still the hours passed, and at last I knew by the glimmer of light in the tomb above that the sun had risen again, and a maddening thirst had hold of me. And then I thought of all the barrels piled up in the vault and of the liquor that they held; and stuck not because 'twas spirit, for I would scarce have paused to sate that thirst even with molten lead.
      The sun was rising in the East.
    5. To become erect; to assume an upright position.
      to rise from a chair or from a fall
    6. To leave one's bed; to get up.
      • Old proverb
        He that would thrive must rise by five.
    7. (figuratively) To be resurrected.
      he rose from the grave;   he is risen!
    8. (figuratively) To terminate an official sitting; to adjourn.
      The committee rose after agreeing to the report.
      • Thomas Macaulay (1800-1859)
        It was near nine [] before the House rose.
  2. (intransitive) To increase in value or standing.
    1. To attain a higher status.
      • (Can we date this quote?) Augustus Hare (1834-1903)
        among the rising theologians of Germany
      • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
        Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.
    2. Of a quantity, price, etc., to increase.
      • 2013 July 6, The rise of smart beta”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8843, page 68:
        Investors face a quandary. Cash offers a return of virtually zero in many developed countries; government-bond yields may have risen in recent weeks but they are still unattractive. Equities have suffered two big bear markets since 2000 and are wobbling again. It is hardly surprising that pension funds, insurers and endowments are searching for new sources of return.
    3. To become more and more dignified or forcible; to increase in interest or power; said of style, thought, or discourse.
      to rise in force of expression; to rise in eloquence;   a story rises in interest.
      • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
        The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; [] . Our table in the dining-room became again the abode of scintillating wit and caustic repartee, Farrar bracing up to his old standard, and the demand for seats in the vicinity rose to an animated competition.
    4. To ascend on a musical scale; to take a higher pitch.
      to rise a tone or semitone
  3. To begin; to develop.
    1. To develop.
      • 2011 December 16, Denis Campbell, “Hospital staff 'lack skills to cope with dementia patients'”, in Guardian:
        Professor Peter Crome, chair of the audit's steering group, said the report "provides further concrete evidence that the care of patients with dementia in hospital is in need of a radical shake-up". While a few hospitals had risen to the challenge of improving patients' experiences, many have not, he said. The report recommends that all staff receive basic dementia awareness training, and staffing levels should be maintained to help such patients.
    2. To swell or puff up in the process of fermentation; to become light.
      Has that dough risen yet?
    3. (of a river) To have its source (in a particular place).
      • 1802 December 1, “Interesting description of the Montanna Real”, in The Monthly magazine, or, British register, Number 94 (Number 5 of Volume 14), page 396:
        The majestic Marannon, or Amazon River, rises out of the Lake Launcocha, situated in the province of Tarma, in 10° 14ʹ south latitude, and ten leagues to the north of Pasco.
    4. To become perceptible to the senses, other than sight.
      a noise rose on the air;   odour rises from the flower
    5. To become agitated, opposed, or hostile; to go to war; to take up arms; to rebel.
      • John Milton (1608-1674)
        At our heels all **** should rise / With blackest insurrection.
      • Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
        No more shall nation against nation rise.
    6. To come to mind; to be suggested; to occur.
      • Spectator
        A thought rose in me, which often perplexes men of contemplative natures.
  4. (transitive) To go up; to ascend; to climb.
    to rise a hill
  5. (transitive) To cause to go up or ascend.
    to rise a fish, or cause it to come to the surface of the water
    to rise a ship, or bring it above the horizon by approaching it
    • W. C. Russell
      Until we rose the bark we could not pretend to call it a chase.
  6. (obsolete) To retire; to give up a siege.
    • Richard Knolles (1545-1610)
      He, rising with small honour from Gunza, [] was gone.
  7. To come; to offer itself.
    • Edmund Spenser (c.1552–1599)
      There chanced to the prince's hand to rise / An ancient book.
  8. (printing, dated) To be lifted, or capable of being lifted, from the imposing stone without dropping any of the type; said of a form.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Coordinate terms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From the above verb.

Noun

rise (plural rises)

  1. The process of or an action or instance of moving upwards or becoming greater.
    The rise of the tide.
    There was a rise of nearly two degrees since yesterday.
    Exercise is usually accompanied by a temporary rise in blood pressure.
  2. The process of or an action or instance of coming to prominence.
    The rise of the working class.
    The rise of the printing press.
    The rise of the feminists.
  3. (chiefly Britain) An increase (in a quantity, price, etc).
  4. The amount of material extending from waist to crotch in a pair of trousers or shorts.
    The rise of his pants was so low that his tailbone was exposed.
  5. (Britain, Ireland, Australia) An increase in someone's pay rate; a raise (US).
    The governor just gave me a rise of two pound six.
  6. (Sussex) A small hill; used chiefly in place names.
  7. An area of terrain that tends upward away from the viewer, such that it conceals the region behind it; a slope.
  8. (informal) An angry reaction.
    I knew that would get a rise out of him.
Synonyms
  • (increase in pay): raise
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English ris, rys, from Old English hrīs, from Proto-Germanic *hrīsą (twig; shoot). More at rice.

Noun

rise (plural rises)

  1. Alternative form of rice (twig)

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: effort · race · ladies · #883: rise · looks · running · garden

Anagrams


Italian

Verb

rise

  1. third-person singular past historic of ridere

Anagrams


Latin

Participle

rīse

  1. vocative masculine singular of rīsus

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse risi. Cognate with German Riese (giant)

Noun

rise m (definite singular risen, indefinite plural riser, definite plural risene)

  1. mountain troll.
  2. jotun (jötunn).
Synonyms

Etymology 2

Verb

rise (present tense riser; past tense riste; past participle rist)

  1. spank

References

  • “rise” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • rise” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Tarantino

Noun

rise

  1. rice