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Webster 1913 Edition


Music

Mu′sic

,
Noun.
[F.
musique
, fr. L.
musica
, Gr. [GREEK] (sc. [GREEK]), any art over which the Muses presided, especially music, lyric poetry set and sung to music, fr. [GREEK] belonging to Muses or fine arts, fr. [GREEK] Muse.]
1.
The science and the art of tones, or musical sounds, i. e., sounds of higher or lower pitch, begotten of uniform and synchronous vibrations, as of a string at various degrees of tension; the science of harmonical tones which treats of the principles of harmony, or the properties, dependences, and relations of tones to each other; the art of combining tones in a manner to please the ear.
☞ Not all sounds are tones. Sounds may be unmusical and yet please the ear. Music deals with tones, and with no other sounds. See
Tone
.
2.
(a)
Melody; a rhythmical and otherwise agreeable succession of tones.
(b)
Harmony; an accordant combination of simultaneous tones.
3.
The written and printed notation of a musical composition; the score.
4.
Love of music; capacity of enjoying music.
The man that hath no
music
in himself
Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils.
Shakespeare
5.
(Zool.)
A more or less musical sound made by many of the lower animals. See
Stridulation
.
Magic music
,
a game in which a person is guided in finding a hidden article, or in doing a specific act required, by music which is made more loud or rapid as he approaches success, and slower as he recedes. It is similar to the game of
hot and cold
, but using music as the clue.
Tennyson.
Music box
.
See
Musical box
, under
Musical
.
Music hall
,
a place for public musical entertainments.
Music loft
,
a gallery for musicians, as in a dancing room or a church.
Music of the spheres
,
the harmony supposed to be produced by the accordant movement of the celestial spheres.
Music paper
,
paper ruled with the musical staff, for the use of composers and copyists.
Music pen
,
a pen for ruling at one time the five lines of the musical staff.
Music shell
(Zool.)
,
a handsomely colored marine gastropod shell (
Voluta musica
) found in the East Indies; – so called because the color markings often resemble printed music. Sometimes applied to other shells similarly marked.
To face the music
,
to meet any disagreeable necessity, such as a reprimand for an error or misdeed, without flinching.
[Colloq. or Slang]

Webster 1828 Edition


Music

MU'SIC

,
Noun.
s as z. [L. musica.]
1.
Melody or harmony; any succession of sounds so modulated as to please the ear, or any combination of simultaneous sounds in accordance or harmony. Music is vocal or instrumental. Vocal music is the melody of a single voice, or the harmony of two or more voices in concert. Instrumental music is that produced by one or more instruments.
By music minds an equal temper know.
2.
Any entertainment consisting in melody or harmony.
What music and dancing and diversions and songs are to many in the world, that prayers and devotions and psalms are to you.
3.
The science of harmonical sounds, which treats of the principles of harmony, or the properties, dependencies and relations of sounds to each other. This may be called speculative or theoretical music.
4.
The art of combining sounds in a manner to please the ear. This is practical music or composition.
5.
Order; harmony in revolutions; as the music of the spheres.

Definition 2021


music

music

See also: músic

English

Wikiquote

Alternative forms

Noun

music (usually uncountable, plural musics)

  1. A sound, or the study of such sounds, organized in time.
    I keep listening to this music because it's eargasmic.
  2. (figuratively) Any pleasing or interesting sounds.
  3. An art form, created by organizing of pitch, rhythm, and sounds made using musical instruments and sometimes singing.
  4. A guide to playing or singing a particular tune; sheet music.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Verb

music (third-person singular simple present musics, present participle musicking, simple past and past participle musicked)

  1. (transitive) To seduce or entice with music.

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: likely · beneath · conversation · #835: music · direction · o' · eight

References

  • music in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Interlingua

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmuzik]

Adjective

music (comparative plus music, superlative le plus music)

  1. musical, of, or pertaining to music.

Synonyms