Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Los

Los

,
Noun.
Praise. See
Loos
.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.

Definition 2022


Los

Los

See also: los, LOS, lös, loš, -los, los', -lös, and Appendix:Variations of "los"

Finnish

Proper noun

Los

  1. (informal) LA (Los Angeles, metropol in California)

Declension

Inflection of Los (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative Los Losit
genitive Losin Losien
partitive Losia Loseja
illative Losiin Loseihin
singular plural
nominative Los Losit
accusative nom. Los Losit
gen. Losin
genitive Losin Losien
partitive Losia Loseja
inessive Losissa Loseissa
elative Losista Loseista
illative Losiin Loseihin
adessive Losilla Loseilla
ablative Losilta Loseilta
allative Losille Loseille
essive Losina Loseina
translative Losiksi Loseiksi
instructive Losein
abessive Lositta Loseitta
comitative Loseineen

Derived terms

Synonyms


German

Etymology

From Old High German hlōz, compare Dutch lot

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːs/
  • Rhymes: -oːs

Noun

Los n (genitive Loses, plural Lose)

  1. lottery ticket
  2. lot, fate

Declension

los

los

See also: Appendix:Variations of "los"

Asturian

Article

los m pl (masculine sg el, feminine sg la, neuter sg lo, feminine plural les)

  1. (definite) the

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin illos; cf. els.

Pronoun

los (enclitic, contracted 'ls, proclitic els)

  1. them (masculine, direct or indirect object)
  2. them (feminine, indirect object only)

Declension


Czech

Noun

los m

  1. elk (British), moose (U.S.)

Declension

  1. lottery ticket

Declension


Danish

Adjective

los

  1. loose

Noun

los c (singular definite lossen, plural indefinite losser)

  1. lynx

Inflection

Noun

los n (singular definite losset, plural indefinite los)

  1. kick

Inflection


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔs

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *lausaz. Cognate with English loose.

Adjective

los (comparative losser, superlative meest los or lost)

  1. loose
  2. separate
Inflection
Inflection of los
uninflected los
inflected losse
comparative losser
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial los losser het lost
het loste
indefinite m./f. sing. losse lossere loste
n. sing. los losser loste
plural losse lossere loste
definite losse lossere loste
partitive los lossers
Derived terms

Verb

los

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lossen
  2. imperative of lossen

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch los, from Old Dutch *los, from Proto-Germanic *luhsuz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (light, to shine) or from a substrate language.[1] Cognate with Old Saxon lohs, Old High German luhs, Old English lox, from a similar Germanic form also Swedish lodjur. Cognates outside Germanic include Ancient Greek λύγξ (lúnx), Lithuanian lūšis, Old Church Slavonic роусь (rusĭ), Old Irish lug, Old Armenian լուսանունք (lusanunkʿ).

Noun

los m (plural lossen, diminutive losje n)

  1. (archaic) lynx (specifically the Eurasian lynx)
Synonyms

Anagrams

References

  1. Philippa, M.; Debrabandere, F.; Quak, A.; Schoonheim, T.; Van der Sijs, N. (2003–2009), lynx”, in Etymologisch woordenboek van het Nederlands (in Dutch), Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press

Dutch Low Saxon

Etymology

Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *lausaz, cognate with Dutch los and English loose.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔs

Adjective

los

  1. open

French

Noun

los m (plural los)

  1. (obsolete) praise; acclaim

Synonyms


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːs/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /lɔs/ (regionally; chiefly as interjection or when meaning “going on”)

Etymology 1

From Old High German lōs.

Adjective

los (comparative loser, superlative am losesten)

  1. Alternative form of lose (loose)

Adverb

los (only used in combination with a verb)

  1. off, rid of
    Ich bin meine Erkältung los.
    I've got rid of my cold.
  2. going on
    Hier ist einiges los.
    There's a lot going on here.

Interjection

los

  1. come on!, let's go!
    Los! An die Arbeit!
    Come on! Let's get to work!

Usage notes

In compound verbs it is generally vain to distinguish those in which los is the adjective los(e) from those in which it is the adverb. For example, in losmachen (loosen) it seems to be the adjective, in losfahren (leave) and loswerden (get rid) it is the adverb.

Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

los

  1. Imperative singular of losen.

Interlingua

Pronoun

los

  1. (accusative, dative) them, those

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Borrowing from Low German lots (short form of lotsman); compare with German Lotse.

Noun

los m (definite singular losen, indefinite plural loser, definite plural losene)

  1. (nautical) a pilot (person who guides ships in and out of a harbour)

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Borrowing from Low German lots (short form of lotsman).

Alternative forms

  • lós

Noun

los m (definite singular losen, indefinite plural losar, definite plural losane)

  1. (nautical) a pilot (as above)

References


Novial

Pronoun

los

  1. they (all male); them (all male)

Related terms


Occitan

Etymology

From Latin illos, from ille.

Article

los (singular lo, feminine la, feminine plural las)

  1. the; masculine plural definite article

Old French

Etymology

See the verb loer (to laud).

Noun

los m (oblique plural los, nominative singular los, nominative plural los)

  1. glory; positive reputation

Descendants


Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *lausaz, whence also Old English lēas, Old Norse lauss.

Adjective

lōs

  1. loose

Polish

Etymology

From Middle High German lōʒ, from Old High German hlōz, from Proto-Germanic *hlautiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔs/

Noun

los m inan

  1. fate
  2. lottery ticket

Declension

Derived terms
  • (verb) losować
  • (adjective) losowy

Synonyms

  • (lottery ticket): kupon

Portuguese

Pronunciation

Pronoun

los

  1. Alternative form of os (third-person masculine plural objective pronoun) used as an enclitic and mesoclitic following a verb form ending in a consonant (-z, -r and -s, but not -m); the consonant is elided and the preceding vowel takes an accent if necessary

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *ôlsь.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lôs/

Noun

lȍs m (Cyrillic spelling ло̏с)

  1. moose
  2. elk

Declension


Slovene

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlóːs/
  • Tonal orthography: lọ̑s

Noun

lós m anim (genitive lósa, nominative plural lósi)

  1. elk, moose

Declension


Spanish

Etymology 1

From Latin illos accusative plural masculine of ille.

Article

los m pl

  1. the
    ¿Qué hacen los muchachos? "What do the boys do?"
Related terms

Etymology 2

Pronoun

los

  1. Accusative of ellos and ustedes (when referring to more than one man); them, you all (formal)
  2. Plural masculine or neuter pronoun, e.g. los que no hablan, "those who do not speak"

See also


Swedish

Noun

los

  1. indefinite genitive singular of lo

White Hmong

Verb

los

  1. come, return (to one's home / to a place where one resides)

Antonyms

References

  • Ernest E. Heimbach, White Hmong - English Dictionary (1979, SEAP Publications)

Zazaki

Etymology

Compare Armenian լոշ (loš).

Noun

los (genitive singular losi)

  1. lavash