Definify.com

Webster 1828 Edition


De

DE

, a Latin prefix, denotes a moving from, separation; as in debark, decline, decease, deduct, decamp. Hence it often expresses a negative; as in derange. Sometimes it augments the sense, as in deprave, despoil. It coincides nearly in sense with the French des and L. dis.

DE

'ACON,
Noun.
[Gr., a minister or servant.]

Definition 2023


See also: Appendix:Variations of "de"

Irish

Proper noun

 m

  1. inflection of Dia (God):
    1. vocative singular
    2. genitive singular

Etymology 2

Originally the dative of dia (day).

Preposition

(plus genitive, triggers h-prothesis, used only with the names of the days of the week)

  1. on
    Domhnaigh ― on Sunday
Usage notes

is not used with Déardaoin (Thursday), which by itself is both the noun “Thursday” and the adverb “on Thursday”.

Derived terms

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
Dhé nDé
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References


Old Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʲeː/

Noun

 m

  1. inflection of Día (God):
    1. vocative singular
    2. genitive singular

Mutation

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization

pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
nDé
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

See also: Appendix:Variations of "de"

Czech

Noun

 n

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D/d.

Derived terms


French

Etymology 1

Obscure, perhaps from a Vulgar Latin *dadu, itself from Latin dātum, or alternatively of Arabic origin; cf أَعْدَاد (ʾaʿdād). Compare Catalan dau, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish dado.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de/
  • Rhymes: -e

Noun

 m (plural dés)

  1. die (dice)
  2. diced slice (of meat)
  3. The name of the Latin-script letter D/d.

Etymology 2

From an alteration of Old French deel (influenced by the above word), from Late Latin digitāle < Latin digitālis.

Noun

 m (plural dés)

  1. thimble

Anagrams


Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈdeː]

Noun

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D/d.

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tjɛː/
  • Rhymes: -ɛː

Noun

 n (genitive singular dés, nominative plural )

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D/d.

Declension


Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [dʲeː]

Noun

  1. genitive singular of dia

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dhé ndé
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Ladin

Alternative forms

  • dèr
  • dèsc

Etymology

From Latin dāre, present active infinitive of (give).

Verb

  1. To give

Conjugation


Louisiana Creole French

Etymology

From French deux (two).

Numeral

  1. (cardinal) two

Mandarin

Pronunciation

Romanization

(Zhuyin ㄉㄜˊ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of
  2. Pinyin transcription of
  3. Pinyin transcription of
  4. Pinyin transcription of
  5. Pinyin transcription of
  6. Pinyin transcription of
  7. Pinyin transcription of
  8. Pinyin transcription of
  9. Pinyin transcription of
  10. Pinyin transcription of

Norman

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old French doit, doi, from Latin digitus.

Noun

 m (plural dés)

  1. (Jersey, anatomy) finger
Alternative forms
Derived terms
Related terms

Etymology 2

Preposition

  1. (Jersey) Alternative form of d'

Old French

Noun

 m (oblique plural dez, nominative singular dez, nominative plural )

  1. die (cube with numbers or symbols on each face)

Old Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʲeː/

Noun

  1. vocative singular of día
  2. genitive singular of día
  3. nominative plural of día

Mutation

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization

pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndé
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Spanish

Verb

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of dar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of dar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of dar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of dar.