Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Full

Full

(fụl)
,
Adj.
[
Com
par.
Fuller
(fụl′ẽr)
; superl.
Fullest
.]
[OE. & AS.
ful
; akin to OS.
ful
, D.
vol
, OHG.
fol
, G.
voll
, Icel.
fullr
, Sw.
full
, Dan.
fuld
, Goth.
fulls
, L.
plenus
, Gr.
πλήρης
, Skr.
pūṛna
full,
prā
to fill, also to Gr.
πολύσ
much, E.
poly-
, pref., G.
viel
, AS.
fela
. √80. Cf.
Complete
,
Fill
,
Plenary
,
Plenty
.]
1.
Filled up, having within its limits all that it can contain; supplied; not empty or vacant; – said primarily of hollow vessels, and hence of anything else;
as, a cup
full
of water; a house
full
of people.
Had the throne been
full
, their meeting would not have been regular.
Blackstone.
2.
Abundantly furnished or provided; sufficient in quantity, quality, or degree; copious; plenteous; ample; adequate;
as, a
full
meal; a
full
supply; a
full
voice; a
full
compensation; a house
full
of furniture.
3.
Not wanting in any essential quality; complete; entire; perfect; adequate;
as, a
full
narrative; a person of
full
age; a
full
stop; a
full
face; the
full
moon.
It came to pass, at the end of two
full
years, that Pharaoh
dreamed.
Gen. xii. 1.
The man commands
Like a
full
soldier.
Shakespeare
I can not
Request a
fuller
satisfaction
Than you have freely granted.
Ford.
4.
Sated; surfeited.
I am
full
of the burnt offerings of rams.
Is. i. 11.
5.
Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information.
Reading maketh a
full
man.
Bacon.
6.
Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it,
as, to be
full
of some project
.
Every one is
full
of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions.
Locke.
7.
Filled with emotions.
The heart is so
full
that a drop overfills it.
Lowell.
8.
Impregnated; made pregnant.
[Obs.]
Ilia, the fair, . . .
full
of Mars.
Dryden.
At full
,
when full or complete.
Shak.
Full age
(Law)
the age at which one attains full personal rights; majority; – in England and the United States the age of 21 years.
Abbott.
Full and by
(Naut.)
,
sailing closehauled, having all the sails full, and lying as near the wind as poesible.
Full band
(Mus.)
,
a band in which all the instruments are employed.
Full binding
,
the binding of a book when made wholly of leather, as distinguished from half binding.
Full bottom
,
a kind of wig full and large at the bottom.
Full brother
or
Full sister
,
a brother or sister having the same parents as another.
Full cry
(Hunting)
,
eager chase; – said of hounds that have caught the scent, and give tongue together.
Full dress
,
the dress prescribed by authority or by etiquette to be worn on occasions of ceremony.
Full hand
(Poker)
,
three of a kind and a pair.
Full moon
.
(a)
The moon with its whole disk illuminated, as when opposite to the sun.
(b)
The time when the moon is full.
Full organ
(Mus.)
,
the organ when all or most stops are out.
Full score
(Mus.)
,
a score in which all the parts for voices and instruments are given.
Full sea
,
high water.
Full swing
,
free course; unrestrained liberty; “Leaving corrupt nature to . . . the full swing and freedom of its own extravagant actings.” South (
Colloq
.)
In full
,
at length; uncontracted; unabridged; written out in words, and not indicated by figures.
In full blast
.
See under
Blast
.

Full

,
Noun.
Complete measure; utmost extent; the highest state or degree.
The swan’s-down feather,
That stands upon the swell at
full
of tide.
Shakespeare
Full of the moon
,
the time of full moon.

Full

,
adv.
Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution; with the whole force or effect; thoroughly; completely; exactly; entirely.
The pawn I proffer shall be
full
as good.
Dryden.
The diapason closing
full
in man.
Dryden.
Full
in the center of the sacred wood.
Addison.
Full is also prefixed to participles to express utmost extent or degree; as, full-bloomed, full-blown, full-crammed full-grown, full-laden, full -stuffed, etc. Such compounds, for the most part, are self-defining.

Full

,
Verb.
I.
To become full or wholly illuminated;
as, the moon fulls at midnight
.

Full

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Fulled
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Fulling
.]
[OE.
fullen
, OF.
fuler
,
fouler
, F.
fouler
, LL.
fullare
, fr. L.
fullo
fuller, cloth fuller, cf. Gr. [GREEK] shining, white, AS.
fullian
to whiten as a fuller, to baptize,
fullere
a fuller. Cf.
Defile
to foul,
Foil
to frustrate,
Fuller
.
Noun.
]
To thicken by moistening, heating, and pressing, as cloth; to mill; to make compact; to scour, cleanse, and thicken in a mill.

Full

,
Verb.
I.
To become fulled or thickened;
as, this material
fulls
well
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Full

FULL

, a.
1.
Replete; having within its limits all that it can contain; as a vessel full of liquor.
2.
Abounding with; having a large quantity or abundance; as a house full of furniture; life is full of cares and perplexities.
3.
Supplied; not vacant.
Had the throne been full, their meeting would not have been regular.
4.
Plump; fat; as a full body.
5.
Saturated; sated.
I am full of the burnt offerings of rams. Is. 1.
6.
Crowded, with regard to the imagination or memory.
Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions.
7.
Large; entire; not partial; that fills; as a full meal.
8.
Complete; entire; not defective or partial; as the full accomplishment of a prophecy.
9.
Complete; entire; without abatement.
It came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharoah dreamed - Gen 41.
10.
Containing the whole matter; expressing the whole; as a full narration or description.
11.
Strong; not faint or attenuated; loud; clear; distinct; as a full voice or sound.
12.
Mature; perfect; as a person of full age.
13.
Entire; complete; denoting the completion of a sentence; as a full stop or point.
14.
Spread to view in all dimensions; as a head drawn with a full face.
15.
Exhibiting the whole disk or surface illuminated; as the full moon.
16.
Abundant; plenteous; sufficient. We have a full supply of provisions for the year.
17.
Adequate; equal; as a full compensation or reward for labor.
18.
Well fed.
19.
Well supplied or furnished; abounding.
20.
Copious; ample. The speaker or the writer was full upon that point.
A full band, in music, is when all the voices and instruments are employed.
A full organ, is when all or most of the stops are out.

FULL

, n.
1.
Complete measure; utmost extent. this instrument answers to the full.
2.
The highest state or degree.
The swan's down feather, that stands upon the swell at full of tide -
3.
The whole; the total; in the phrase, at full.
4.
The state of satiety; as fed to the full.
The full of the moon, is the time when it presents to the spectator its whole face illuminated, as it always does when in opposition to the sun.

FULL

,
adv.
1.
Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution.
The pawn I proffer shall be full as good.
2.
With the whole effect.
The diapason closing full in man.
3.
Exactly.
Full in the center of the sacred wood.
4.
Directly; as, he looked him full in the face.
It is placed before adjectives and adverbs to heighten or strengthen their signification; as full sad.
Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition. Mark 7.
Full is prefixed to other words, chiefly participles, to express utmost extent or degree.

Definition 2021


full

full

See also: full-, fúll, and -full

English

Adjective

full (comparative fuller, superlative fullest)

  1. Containing the maximum possible amount of that which can fit in the space available.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      'Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.
    The jugs were full to the point of overflowing.
  2. Complete; with nothing omitted.
    • 2013 July-August, Catherine Clabby, Focus on Everything”, in American Scientist:
      Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. [] A photo processing technique called focus stacking has changed that. Developed as a tool to electronically combine the sharpest bits of multiple digital images, focus stacking is a boon to biologists seeking full focus on a micron scale.
    Our book gives full treatment to the subject of angling.
  3. Total, entire.
    She had tattoos the full length of her arms.   He was prosecuted to the full extent of the law.
  4. (informal) Having eaten to satisfaction, having a "full" stomach; replete.
    "I'm full," he said, pushing back from the table.
  5. Of a garment, of a size that is ample, wide, or having ample folds or pleats to be comfortable.
    a full pleated skirt;   She needed her full clothing during her pregnancy.
  6. Having depth and body; rich.
    a full singing voice
  7. (obsolete) Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information.
    • Francis Bacon
      Reading maketh a full man.
  8. Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it.
    She's full of her latest project.
    • John Locke
      Everyone is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions.
  9. Filled with emotions.
    • Lowell
      The heart is so full that a drop overfills it.
  10. (obsolete) Impregnated; made pregnant.
    • Dryden
      Ilia, the fair, [] full of Mars.
  11. (poker, postnominal) Said of the three cards of the same rank in a full house.
    Nines full of aces = three nines and two aces (999AA).
    I'll beat him with my kings full! = three kings and two unspecified cards of the same rank.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Adverb

full (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Quite; thoroughly; completely; exactly; entirely.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      master of a full poor cell
    • Joseph Addison (1672-1719)
      full in the centre of the sacred wood
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act IV, Scene I, verse 112
      You know full well what makes me look so pale.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Dante Gabriel Rosetti, William Blake, lines 9-12
      This cupboard [] / this other one, / His true wife's charge, full oft to their abode / Yielded for daily bread the martyr's stone,
    • 1874, James Thomson, The City of Dreadful Night, IX
      It is full strange to him who hears and feels, / When wandering there in some deserted street, / The booming and the jar of ponderous wheels, []
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. [] She put back a truant curl from her forehead where it had sought egress to the world, and looked him full in the face now, [].
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle English fulle, fylle, fille, from Old English fyllu, fyllo (fullness, fill, plenty), from Proto-Germanic *fullį̄, *fulnō (fullness, filling, overflow), from Proto-Indo-European *plūno-, *plno- (full), from *pelə-, *plē- (to fill; full). Cognate with German Fülle (fullness, fill), Icelandic fylli (fulness, fill). More at fill.

Noun

full (plural fulls)

  1. Utmost measure or extent; highest state or degree; the state, position, or moment of fullness; fill.
    • Shakespeare
      The swan's-down feather, / That stands upon the swell at full of tide.
    • Dryden
      Sicilian tortures and the brazen bull, / Are emblems, rather than express the full / Of what he feels.
    I was fed to the full.
    • 1911, Berthold Auerbach, Bayard Taylor, The villa on the Rhine:
      [] he had tasted their food, and found it so palatable that he had eaten his full before he knew it.
    • 2008, Jay Cassell, The Gigantic Book Of Hunting Stories:
      Early next morning we were over at the elk carcass, and, as we expected, found that the bear had eaten his full at it during the night.
    • 2010, C. E. Morgan, All the Living: A Novel:
      When he had eaten his full, they set to work again.
  2. (of the moon) The phase of the moon when it is entire face is illuminated, full moon.
    • 1765, Francis Bacon, The works of Francis Bacon:
      It is like, that the brain of man waxeth moister and fuller upon the full of the moon: [...]
    • 1808, Joseph Hall, Josiah Pratt (editor), Works, Volume VII: Practical Works, Revised edition, page 219,
      This earthly moon, the Church, hath her fulls and wanings, and sometimes her eclipses, while the shadow of this sinful mass hides her beauty from the world.
  3. (freestyle skiing) An aerialist maneuver consisting of a backflip in conjunction and simultaneous with a complete twist.
Derived terms

(freestyle skiing):

  • double full
  • lay-full
  • full-full
  • full-double full
  • double full-full
  • lay-full-full
  • full-full-full
  • lay-double full-full
  • full-double full-full
Translations

Verb

full (third-person singular simple present fulls, present participle fulling, simple past and past participle fulled)

  1. (of the moon) To become full or wholly illuminated.
    • 1888 September 20, "The Harvest Moon," New York Times (retrieved 10 April 2013):
      The September moon fulls on the 20th at 24 minutes past midnight, and is called the harvest moon.
    • 1905, Annie Fellows Johnston, The Little Colonel's Christmas Vacation, ch. 4:
      "By the black cave of Atropos, when the moon fulls, keep thy tryst!"
    • 1918, Kate Douglas Wiggin, The Story Of Waitstill Baxter, ch. 29:
      "The moon fulls to-night, don't it?"

Etymology 3

From Middle English fullen, fulwen, from Old English fullian, fulwian (to baptise), from Proto-Germanic *fullawīhōną (to fully consecrate), from *fulla- (full-) + *wīhōną (to hallow, consecrate, make holy). Compare Old English fulluht, fulwiht (baptism).

Verb

full (third-person singular simple present fulls, present participle fulling, simple past and past participle fulled)

  1. (transitive) To baptise.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English [Term?], from Old French fuller, fouler (to tread, to stamp, to full), from Medieval Latin fullare, from Latin fullo (a fuller)

Verb

full (third-person singular simple present fulls, present participle fulling, simple past and past participle fulled)

  1. To make cloth denser and firmer by soaking, beating and pressing, to waulk, walk
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: soon · almost · thou · #218: full · country · course · side

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin folium (leaf), probably from Proto-Indo-European *bʰolh₃yom (leaf), from *bʰleh₃- (blossom, flower). Compare French feuille, Spanish hoja, Italian foglio, Italian foglia (the latter from Latin folia, plural of folium).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /ˈfuʎ/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈfuʎ/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈfuʎ/
  • Rhymes: -uʎ

Noun

full m (plural fulls)

  1. sheet of paper

Related terms


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ful/

Etymology 1

Borrowing from English full.

Adjective

full m, f (plural fulls)

  1. (Quebec) full
  2. (Quebec) overflowing, packed, crowded

Adverb

full

  1. (Quebec) very, really
    C'est full poche, ça ! ― That really sucks!

Etymology 2

From English full house.

Noun

full m (plural fulls)

  1. (poker) full house

Italian

Etymology

From English full house.

Noun

full m (invariable)

  1. (poker) full house

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse fullr, from Proto-Germanic *fullaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁nós. Cognates include Danish fuld, Swedish full, Icelandic fullur, German voll, Dutch vol, English full, Gothic 𐍆𐌵𐌻𐌻𐍃 (fqlls), Lithuanian pilnas, Old Church Slavonic плънъ (plŭnŭ), Latin plēnus, Ancient Greek πλήρης (plḗrēs) and πλέως (pléōs), Old Irish lán, and Sanskrit पूर्ण (pūrṇa).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʉl/

Adjective

full (neuter singular fullt, definite singular and plural fulle, comparative fullere, indefinite superlative fullest, definite superlative fulleste)

  1. full (containing the maximum possible amount)
  2. drunk

Related terms

Derived terms

See also

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse fullr, from Proto-Germanic *fullaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁nós. For cognates see above.

Adjective

full (neuter singular fullt, definite singular and plural fulle, comparative fullare, indefinite superlative fullast, definite superlative fullaste)

  1. full (containing the maximum possible amount)
  2. drunk

Related terms

Derived terms

See also

References


Old English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *fullaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁nós (full), from *pleh₁- (to fill).

Germanic cognates include Old Frisian ful, Old Saxon ful, full, Old High German foll, Old Norse fullr, and Gothic 𐍆𐌵𐌻𐌻𐍃 (fulls).

Indo-European cognates include Old Church Slavonic плънъ (plŭnŭ), Latin plēnus, Ancient Greek πλήρης (plḗrēs) and πλέως (pléōs), Old Irish lán, and Sanskrit पूर्ण (pūrṇa).

Alternative forms

Adjective

full

  1. full, filled, complete, entire
Declension
Related terms
Descendants

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *fullą (vessel), from Proto-Indo-European *pēl(w)- (a kind of vessel). Akin to Old Saxon full (beaker), Old Norse full (beaker).

Alternative forms

Noun

full n

  1. a beaker.
  2. a cup, especially one with liquor in it.
Declension

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse fullr, from Proto-Germanic *fullaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁nós

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɵl/

Adjective

full

  1. full (containing the maximum possible amount)
  2. drunk, intoxicated

Declension

Inflection of full
Indefinite/attributive Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular full fullare fullast
Neuter singular fullt fullare fullast
Plural fulla fullare fullast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 fulle fullare fullaste
All fulla fullare fullaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in an attributive role.

Synonyms

Related terms