Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


For

For

,
p
rep.
[AS.
for
,
fore
; akin to OS.
for
,
fora
,
furi
, D.
voor
, OHG.
fora
, G.
vor
, OHG.
furi
, G.
für
, Icel.
fyrir
, Sw.
för
, Dan.
for
, adv.
för
, Goth.
faúr
,
faúra
, L.
pro
, Gr. [GREEK], Skr.
pra
-. √ 202. Cf.
Fore
,
First
,
Foremost
,
Forth
,
Pro-
.]
In the most general sense, indicating that in consideration of, in view of, or with reference to, which anything is done or takes place.
1.
Indicating the antecedent cause or occasion of an action; the motive or inducement accompanying and prompting to an act or state; the reason of anything; that on account of which a thing is or is done.
With fiery eyes sparkling
for
very wrath.
Shakespeare
How to choose dogs
for
scent or speed.
Waller.
Now,
for
so many glorious actions done,
For
peace at home, and
for
the public wealth,
I mean to crown a bowl
for
Cæsar’s health.
Dryden.
That which we,
for
our unworthiness, are afraid to crave, our prayer is, that God,
for
the worthiness of his Son, would, notwithstanding, vouchsafe to grant.
Hooker.
2.
Indicating the remoter and indirect object of an act; the end or final cause with reference to which anything is, acts, serves, or is done.
The oak
for
nothing ill,
The osier good
for
twigs, the poplar
for
the mill.
Spenser.
It was young counsel
for
the persons, and violent counsel
for
the matters.
Bacon.
Shall I think the worls was made
for one
,
And men are born
for
kings, as beasts
for
men,
Not
for
protection, but to be devoured?
Dryden.
For he writes not
for
money, nor
for
praise.
Denham.
3.
Indicating that in favor of which, or in promoting which, anything is, or is done; hence, in behalf of; in favor of; on the side of; – opposed to against.
We can do nothing against the truth, but
for
the truth.
2 Cor. xiii. 8.
It is
for
the general good of human society, and consequently of particular persons, to be true and just; and it is
for
men's health to be temperate.
Tillotson.
Aristotle is
for
poetical justice.
Dennis.
4.
Indicating that toward which the action of anything is directed, or the point toward which motion is made; [GREEK]ntending to go to.
We sailed from Peru
for
China and Japan.
Bacon.
5.
Indicating that on place of or instead of which anything acts or serves, or that to which a substitute, an equivalent, a compensation, or the like, is offered or made; instead of, or place of.
And if any mischief follow, then thou shalt give life
for
life, eye
for
eye, tooth
for
tooth, hand
for
hand, foot
for
foot.
Ex. xxi. 23, 24.
6.
Indicating that in the character of or as being which anything is regarded or treated; to be, or as being.
We take a falling meteor
for
a star.
Cowley.
If a man can be fully assured of anything
for
a truth, without having examined, what is there that he may not embrace
for
tru[GREEK]?
Locke.
Most of our ingenious young men take up some cried-up English poet for
their model.
Dryden.
But let her go
for
an ungrateful woman.
Philips.
7.
Indicating that instead of which something else controls in the performing of an action, or that in spite of which anything is done, occurs, or is; hence, equivalent to notwithstanding, in spite of; – generally followed by all, aught, anything, etc.
The writer will do what she please
for
all me.
Spectator.
God's desertion shall,
for
aught he knows, the next minute supervene.
Dr. H. More.
For
anything that legally appears to the contrary, it may be a contrivance to fright us.
Swift.
8.
Indicating the space or time through which an action or state extends; hence, during; in or through the space or time of.
For
many miles about
There 's scarce a bush.
Shakespeare
Since, hired
for
life, thy servile muse sing.
prior.
To guide the sun's bright chariot
for
a day.
Garth.
9.
Indicating that in prevention of which, or through fear of which, anything is done.
[Obs.]
We 'll have a bib,
for
spoiling of thy doublet.
Beau. & Fl.
For
, or
As for
,
so far as concerns; as regards; with reference to; – used parenthetically or independently. See under
As
.

As for
me and my house, we will serve the Lord.
Josh. xxiv. 15.
For all that
,
notwithstanding; in spite of.
For all the world
,
wholly; exactly.
“Whose posy was, for all the world, like cutlers' poetry.”
Shak.
For as much as
, or
Forasmuch as
,
in consideration that; seeing that; since.
For by
.
See
Forby
,
adv.
For ever
,
eternally; at all times. See
Forever
.
For me
, or
For all me
,
as far as regards me.
For my life
, or
For the life of me
,
if my life depended on it.
[Colloq.]
T. Hook.
For that
,
For the reason that
,
because; since.
[Obs.]
For that I love your daughter.”
Shak.
For thy
, or
Forthy
[AS.
forðȳ
.]
,
for this; on this account.
[Obs.]
“Thomalin, have no care for thy.”
Spenser.
For to
,
as sign of infinitive, in order to; to the end of.
[Obs., except as sometimes heard in illiterate speech.]
– “What went ye out for to see?”
Luke vii. 25.
See
To
,
p
rep.
, 4.
O for
,
would that I had; may there be granted; – elliptically expressing desire or prayer.
O for a muse of fire.”
Shak.
Were it not for
, or
If it were not for
,
leaving out of account; but for the presence or action of.
“Moral consideration can no way move the sensible appetite, were it not for the will.”
Sir M. Hale.

For

,
c
onj.
1.
Because; by reason that; for that; indicating, in Old English, the reason of anything.
And
for
of long that way had walkéd none,
The vault was hid with plants and bushes hoar.
Fairfax.
And Heaven defend your good souls, that you think
I will your serious and great business scant,
For
she with me.
Shakespeare
2.
Since; because; introducing a reason of something before advanced, a cause, motive, explanation, justification, or the like, of an action related or a statement made. It is logically nearly equivalent to since, or because, but connects less closely, and is sometimes used as a very general introduction to something suggested by what has gone before.
Give thanks unto the Lord;
for
he is good;
for
his mercy endureth forever.
Ps. cxxxvi. 1.
Heaven doth with us as we with torches do,
Not light them for themselves;
for
if our virtues
Did not go forth of us, 't were all alike
As if we had them not.
Shakespeare
Syn. – See
Because
.

For

,
Noun.
One who takes, or that which is said on, the affrimative side; that which is said in favor of some one or something; – the antithesis of against, and commonly used in connection with it.
The fors and against
.
those in favor and those opposed; the pros and the cons; the advantages and the disadvantages.
Jane Austen.

Webster 1828 Edition


For

FOR

, prep. [L. per.; The English, for; to forbid. For corresponds in sense with the L. pro, as fore does with proe, but pro and proe are probably contracted from prod, proed. The Latin por, in composition, as in porrigo, is probably contracted from porro, Gr. which is the English far. The Gr. are from the same root. The radical sense of for is to go, to pass, to advance, to reach or stretch.]
1.
Against; in the place of; as a substitute or equivalent, noting equal value or satisfactory compensation, either in barter and sale, in contract, or in punishment. 'And Joseph gave them bread in exchange for horses, and for flocks, and for the cattle of the herds;' that is, according to the original, he gave them bread against horses like the Gr. Gen. 48:17.
Buy us and our land for bread. Gen. 47:19.
And if any mischief follow, then thou shalt give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot. Ex. 21.
2.
In the place of; instead of; noting substitution of persons, or agency of one in the place of another with equivalent authority. An attorney is empowered to act for his principal. Will you take a letter and deliver it for me at the post office? that is, in my place, or for my benefit.
3.
In exchange of; noting one thing taken or given in place of another; as, to quit the profession of law for that of a clergyman.
4.
In the place of; instead of; as, to translate a poem line for line.
5.
In the character of; noting resemblance; a sense derived from substitution or standing in the place of, like in the Greek.
If a man can be fully assured of any thing for a truth, without having examined, what is there that he may not embrace for truth?
But let her go for an ungrateful woman.
I hear for certain, and do speak the truth.
He quivered with his feet and lay for dead.
6.
Towards; with the intention of going to.
We sailed directly for Genoa, and had a fair wind.
So we say, a ship is bound for or to France.
7.
In advantage of; for the sake of; on account of; that is, towards, noting use, benefit or purpose.
An ant is a wise creature for itself. Shall I think the world was made for one, and men are born for kings, as beasts for men, not for protection, but to be devoured.
8.
Conducive to; beneficial to; in favor of.
It is for the general good of human society, and consequently of particular persons, to be true and just; and it is for men's health to be temperate.
9.
Leading or inducing to, as a motive.
There is a natural immutable, and eternal reason for that which we call virtue, and against that which we call vice.
10.
Noting arrival, meeting, coming or possession. Wait patiently for an expected good. So in the phrases, looking for, staying for.
11.
Towards the obtaining of; in order to the arrival at or possession of. After all our exertions, we depend on divine aid for success.
12.
Against; in opposition to; with a tendency to resist and destroy; as a remedy for the headache or toothache. Alkalies are good for the heartburn. So we say, to provide clothes or stores for winter, or against winter.
13.
Against or on account of; in prevention of.
She wrapped him close for catching cold.
And, for the time shall not seem tedious -
This use is nearly obsolete. The sense however is derived from meeting, opposing, as in number 12.
14.
Because; on account of; by reason of. He cried out for anguish. I cannot go for want of time. For this cause, I cannot believe the report.
That which we for our unworthiness are afraid to crave, our prayer is, that God for the worthiness of his son would notwithstanding vouchsafe to grant.
Edward and Richard, with fiery eyes sparkling for very wrath, are at our backs.
How to choose dogs for scent or speed.
For as much as it is a fundamental law -
15.
With respect or regard to; on the part of.
It was young counsel for the persons, and violent counsel for the matters.
Thus much for the beginning and progress of the deluge.
So we say, for me, for myself, or as for me, I have no anxiety, but for you I have apprehensions; all implying towards or on the side of.
16.
Through a certain space; during a certain time; as, to travel for three days; to sail for seven weeks; he holds his office for life; he traveled on sand for ten miles together. These senses seem to imply passing, the proper sense of for.
17.
In quest of; in order to obtain; as, to search for arguments; to recur to antiquity for examples. See number 11.
18.
According to; as far as.
Chimists have not been able, for aught is vulgarly known, by fire alone to separate true sulphur from antimony.
19.
Noting meeting, coming together, or reception. I am ready for you; that is, I am ready to meet or receive you.
20.
Towards; of tendency to; as an inclination for drink.
21.
In favor of; on the part or side of; that is, towards or inclined to. One is for a free government; another is for a limited monarchy.
Aristotle is for poetical justice.
22.
With a view to obtain; in order to possess. He writes for money, or for fame; that is, towards meeting, or to have in return, as a reward.
23.
Towards; with tendency to, or in favor of. It is for his honor to retire from office. It is for our quiet to have few intimate connections.
24.
Notwithstanding; against; in opposition to. The fact may be so, for any thing that has yet appeared. The task is great, but for all that, I shall not be deterred from undertaking it. This is a different application of the sense of numbers 1,2,3,4.
The writer will do what she pleases for all me.
25.
For the use of; to be used in; that is, towards, noting advantage.
The oak for nothing ill, the osier good for twigs, the poplar for the mill.
26.
In recompense of; in return of.
Now, for so many glorious actions done, for peace at home, and for the public wealth, I mean to crown a bowl for Caesar's health. [See Number 1.]
27.
In proportion to; or rather, looking towards, regarding. He is tall for one of his years, or tall for his age.
28.
By means of.
Moral consideration can no way move the sensible appetite, were it not for the will.
29.
By the want of.
The inhabitants suffered severely both for provisions and fuel.
30.
For my life or heart, though my life were to be given in exchange, or as the price of purchase. I cannot, for my life, understand the man. Number 1.
31.
For to, denoting purpose. For was anciently placed before the infinitives of verbs, and the use is correct, but now obsolete except in vulgar language. I came for to see you; pour vous voir.

FOR

,
con.
1.
The word by which a reason is introduced of something before advanced. 'That ye may be the children of your father who is in heaven; for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good.' In such sentences, for has the sense of because, by reason that, as in Number 14; with this difference that in Number 14, the word precedes a single noun, and here it precedes a sentence or clause; but the phrase seems to be elliptical, for this cause or reason, which follows, he maketh his sun to rise, &c. In Romans 13:6, we find the word in both its applications, 'For, for this cause ye pay tribute also -;' the first for referring to the sentence following; the latter to the noun cause.
2.
Because; on this account that; properly, for that.
For as much, compounded, forasmuch, is equivalent to, in regard to that, in consideration of. Forasmuch as the thirst is intolerable, the patient may be indulged in a little drink.

Definition 2021


for

for

See also: FOR, fór, fôr, för, for-, för-, and Appendix:Variations of "for"

English

Alternative forms

Conjunction

for

  1. (now uncommon) Because.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Chapter 23
      "By means of the Golden Cap I shall command the Winged Monkeys to carry you to the gates of the Emerald City," said Glinda, "for it would be a shame to deprive the people of so wonderful a ruler."

Translations

Preposition

for

  1. Towards.
    The astronauts headed for the moon.
  2. Directed at, intended to belong to.
    I have something for you.
  3. Supporting (opposite of against).
    All those for the motion raise your hands.
  4. Because of.
    He wouldn't apologize; and just for that, she refused to help him.
    (UK usage) He looks better for having lost weight.
    She was the worse for drink.
    • Shakespeare
      with fiery eyes sparkling for very wrath
    • 1867, Frederick Metcalfe, The Oxonian in Iceland (page 202)
      "A summerly day for you," said my host; "You ought to be here in winter. It is impossible then to get out of the doors for the snow and wind. Ugh! dreadful weather!"
  5. Over a period of time.
    I've lived here for three years.
    They fought for days over a silly pencil.
    • Garth
      To guide the sun's bright chariot for a day.
  6. Throughout an extent of space.
    • Shakespeare
      For many miles about / There's scarce a bush.
  7. On behalf of.
    I will stand in for him.
  8. Instead of, or in place of.
    • Bible, Exodus xxi. 23, 24
      And if any mischief follow, then thou shalt give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot.
  9. In order to obtain or acquire.
    I am aiming for completion by the end of business Thursday.
    He's going for his doctorate.
    Do you want to go for coffee?
    People all over Greece looked to Delphi for answers.
    Can you go to the store for some eggs?
    I'm saving up for a car.
    Don't wait for an answer.
    What did he ask you for?
    • Denham
      He writes not for money, nor for praise.
  10. In the direction of: marks a point one is going toward.
    Run for the hills!
    He was headed for the door when he remembered.
    • Francis Bacon
      We sailed from Peru for China and Japan.
  11. By the standards of, usually with the implication of those standards being lower than one might otherwise expect.
    Fair for its day.
    She's spry for an old lady.
  12. Despite, in spite of.
    • 1892 August 6, Charles Dickens, "The Unbidden Guest", in All the Year Round,page 133,
      Mr. Joseph Blenkinshaw was perhaps not worth quite so much as was reported; but for all that he was a very wealthy man []
    • 1968, J. J. Scarisbrick, Henry VIII (page 240)
      For all his faults, there had been something lofty and great about him - as a judge, as a patron of education, as a builder, as an international figure.
  13. Used to indicate the subject of a to-infinitive.
    For that to happen now is incredibly unlikely. (=It is incredibly unlikely that that will happen now.)
    All I want is for you to be happy. (=All I want is that you be happy.)
  14. (chiefly US) Out of; used to indicate a fraction, a ratio
    In term of base hits, Jones was three for four on the day
  15. (cricket) used as part of a score to indicate the number of wickets that have fallen
    At close of play, England were 305 for 3.
  16. Indicating that in the character of or as being which anything is regarded or treated; to be, or as being.
    • Cowley
      We take a falling meteor for a star.
    • John Locke
      If a man can be fully assured of anything for a truth, without having examined, what is there that he may not embrace for true?
    • Dryden
      Most of our ingenious young men take up some cry'd-up English poet for their model.
    • Philips
      But let her go for an ungrateful woman.
  17. Used to construe various verbs. See the entry for the phrasal verb.
  18. (obsolete) Indicating that in prevention of which, or through fear of which, anything is done.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      We'll have a bib, for spoiling of thy doublet.

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: with · is · it · #14: for · as · had · you

References

  • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Spatial particles of orientation", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8

Anagrams


Catalan

Noun

for m (plural fors)

  1. prize, worth
  2. forum

Cornish

Noun

for

  1. Mixed mutation of mor.

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse fóðr, from Middle Low German vōder (linen, sheath), from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą (sheath).

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /foːr/, [foːˀɐ̯]
  • Rhymes: -oːɐ̯

Noun

for n (singular definite foret, plural indefinite for)

  1. lining (covering for the inside of something)
  2. lining (material used for inside covering)
Inflection

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔ/, [fʌ]

Adverb

for

  1. too (more than enough; as too much)
  2. in front
  3. forward

Conjunction

for

  1. for, because

Preposition

for

  1. for
  2. of
  3. to
  4. on
  5. at
  6. before, in front of
  7. by

Etymology 3

See fare (to rush, run).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /foːr/, [foːˀɐ̯]

Verb

for, fór or farede

  1. past tense of fare.

Esperanto

Etymology

Compare Latin forās (outside).

Adverb

for

  1. away, far, gone
    • 1998, Henrik Ibsen, trans. Odd Tangerud Puphejmo : Dramo en tri aktoj,
      NORA (komencas elpreni el la skatolo, sed baldaŭ forĵetas ĉion). Ho, se mi kuraĝus eliri. Se nur neniu venus. Se nur ne dume okazus io hejme. Stulta babilaĵo; neniu venos. Nur ne pensi. Brosi la mufon. Delikataj gantoj, delikataj gantoj. For el la pensoj! For, for! Unu, du, tri, kvar, kvin, ses — (krias) Jen, tie ili venas —
      NORA (begins to unpack the box, but soon pushes it all away). Oh, if I dared go out. If only no one would come. If only I could be sure nothing would happen here in the meantime. Stupid nonsense; no one will come. Only I mustn't think about it. I will brush my muff. What lovely, lovely gloves. Out of my thoughts, Away, away! One, two, three, four, five, six— (Screams) There, someone's coming—

Derived terms


Galician

Etymology 1

Inflected form of ir (to go).

Verb

for

  1. first-person singular future subjunctive of ir
  2. third-person singular future subjunctive of ir

Etymology 2

Inflected form of ser (to be).

Verb

for

  1. first-person singular future subjunctive of ser
  2. third-person singular future subjunctive of ser

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔːr/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːr

Noun

for f (genitive singular forar, nominative plural forir)

  1. mud
  2. bog

Declension

Derived terms

  • forarpittur

Ido

Preposition

for

  1. far from

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *fāōr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to speak). Cognates include fama (news; fame), fabula (story, tale, fable), Ancient Greek φημί (phēmí, speak), φάτις (phátis, rumour, news, speech), φάσις (phásis, speech, announcement), φωνή (phōnḗ, voice), Old Church Slavonic баяти (bajati, tell, narrate) and баснь (basnĭ, fable) (Russian ба́ять (bájatʹ) and ба́сня (básnja)) and Old English bannan (English ban). Compare also Sanskrit भनति (bhánati, speak).

Pronunciation

Verb

for (present infinitive fārī, perfect active fātus sum); first conjugation, deponent

  1. I speak, talk, say.

Inflection

   Conjugation of for (first conjugation, deponent)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present for fāris, fāre fātur fāmur fāminī fantur
imperfect fābar fābāris, fābāre fābātur fābāmur fābāminī fābantur
future fābor fāberis, fābere fābitur fābimur fābiminī fābuntur
perfect fātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect fātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect fātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present fer fēris, fēre fētur fēmur fēminī fentur
imperfect fārer fārēris, fārēre fārētur fārēmur fārēminī fārentur
perfect fātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect fātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present fāre fāminī
future fātor fātor fantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives fārī fātus esse fātūrus esse
participles fāns fātus fātūrus fandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
fārī fandī fandō fandum fātum fātū

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

References

  • for in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • for in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • FOR in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book, London: Macmillan and Co.
    • good Latin: sermo latinus (opp. sermo parum latinus) (cf. sect. VII. 2., note For the use of adverbs...)
    • thought and deed: consilia et facta (cf. sect. X. 1, note For 'thoughts and deeds'...)
    • (ambiguous) to translate freely: his fere verbis, hoc fere modo convertere, transferre
    • (ambiguous) synonyms: vocabula idem fere declarantia
    • (ambiguous) to talk of a subject which was then the common topic of conversation: in eum sermonem incidere, qui tum fere multis erat in ore
    • (ambiguous) as usually happens: ut fit, ita ut fit, ut fere fit
    • (ambiguous) he spoke (very much) as follows: haec (fere) dixit
    • (ambiguous) this is very much what Cicero said: haec Ciceronis fere

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔrː/ (unstressed)
  • IPA(key): /fɔ/ (unstressed)

Etymology 1

Adverb

for

  1. too
    for ung ― too young
    for langt ― too far
Synonyms

Etymology 2

Conjunction

for

  1. for
Synonyms

Etymology 3

From Old Norse fóðr

Noun

for n (definite singular foret, indefinite plural for, definite plural fora or forene)

  1. alternative form of fôr
Derived terms

Etymology 4

Preposition

for

  1. for

Etymology 5

Verb

for

  1. past tense of fare.

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Conjunction

for

  1. for
Synonyms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse fóðr

Noun

for n (definite singular foret, indefinite plural for, definite plural fora)

  1. alternative form of fôr
Derived terms

Etymology 3

Preposition

for

  1. for

References


Novial

Adjective

for

  1. away

Old English

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *fura

Preposition

for

  1. for

Etymology 2

see faran

Verb

fōr

  1. first-person singular preterite of faran
  2. third-person singular preterite of faran

Noun

fōr f

  1. journey, going, course, expedition, approach; passage, lifestyle, way of life
Declension

Etymology 3

Old English

Noun

fōr m

  1. hog, pig
Declension

Old Irish

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *sweseros, from *swīs (you (pl.)); compare Latin vester.

Determiner

for

  1. your (plural)
  2. you (plural; as the object of a preposition that takes the genitive)
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 16d8
      Bíuu-sa oc irbáig dar far cenn-si fri Maccidóndu.
      I am boasting about you to the Macedonians.

Synonyms

  • sethar

Descendants

  • Irish: bhur
  • Scottish Gaelic: ur

Old Saxon

Noun

for

  1. Alternative form of fora

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

Verb

for

  1. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of ir
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of ir
    Quando for, me avise. When she goes, let me know.
  3. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of ser
  4. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of ser
    Enquanto ela for viva, merece todo o nosso respeito. As long as she is alive, she deserves all our respect.

Etymology 2

Borrowing from English for.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfɔʁ/, /ˈfɔɹ/

Noun

for m (plural fors)

  1. (programming) for (a loop that uses a counter)

Swedish

Verb

for

  1. past tense of fara.

Walloon

Noun

for m (plural fors)

  1. oven