Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Far

Far

,
Noun.
[See
Farrow
.]
(Zool.)
A young pig, or a litter of pigs.

Far

,
Adj.
[
Farther
(#)
and
Farthest
(#)
are used as the
com
par.
and
sup
erl.
of
far
, although they are corruptions arising from confusion with further and furthest. See
Further
.]
[OE.
fer
,
feor
, AS.
feor
; akin to OS.
fer
, D.
ver
, OHG.
ferro
, adv., G.
fern
,
Adj.
, Icel.
fjarri
, Dan.
fjirn
, Sw.
fjerran
, adv., Goth.
faīrra
, adv., Gr. [GREEK][GREEK][GREEK][GREEK][GREEK] beyond, Skr.
paras
, adv., far, and prob. to L.
per
through, and E. prefix
for-
, as in
for
give, and also to
fare
. Cf.
Farther
,
Farthest
.]
1.
Distant in any direction; not near; remote; mutually separated by a wide space or extent.
They said, . . . We be come from a
far
country.
Josh. ix. 6.
The nations
far
and near contend in choice.
Dryden.
2.
Remote from purpose; contrary to design or wishes;
as,
far
be it from me to justify cruelty
.
3.
Remote in affection or obedience; at a distance, morally or spiritually; t enmity with; alienated.
They that are
far
from thee ahsll perish.
Ps. lxxiii. 27.
4.
Widely different in nature or quality; opposite in character.
He was
far
from ill looking, though he thought himself still farther.
F. Anstey.
5.
The more distant of two;
as, the
far
side (called also
off side
) of a horse, that is, the right side, or the one opposite to the rider when he mounts
.
☞ The distinction between the adjectival and adverbial use of far is sometimes not easily discriminated.
By far
,
by much; by a great difference.
Far between
,
with a long distance (of space or time) between; at long intervals.
“The examinations are few and far between.”
Farrar.

Far

,
adv.
1.
To a great extent or distance of space; widely;
as, we are separated
far
from each other
.
2.
To a great distance in time from any point; remotely;
as, he pushed his researches
far
into antiquity
.
3.
In great part;
as, the day is
far
spent
.
4.
In a great proportion; by many degrees; very much; deeply; greatly.
Who can find a virtuous woman ? for her price is
far
above rubies.
Prov. xxxi. 10.
As far as
,
to the extent, or degree, that. See
As far as
, under
As
.
Far off
.
(a)
At a great distance, absolutely or relatively.
(b)
Distant in sympathy or affection; alienated.
“But now, in Christ Jesus, ye who some time were far off are made nigh by the blood of Christ.”
Eph. ii. 13.
Far other
,
different by a great degree; not the same; quite unlike.
Pope.
Far and near
,
at a distance and close by; throughout a whole region.
Far and wide
,
distantly and broadly; comprehensively.
Far and wide his eye commands.”
Milton.
From far
,
from a great distance; from a remote place.
Far often occurs in self-explaining compounds, such as far-extended, far-reaching, far-spread.

Webster 1828 Edition


Far

F'AR

,
Adj.
[L. porro; Gr. connected with, a way, a passing, to pass or go. See Fare.]
1.
Distant, in any direction; separated by a wide space from the place where one is, or from any given place remote.
They said, we are come from a far country. Jos. 9.
The kingdom of heaven is as a man travelling into a far country. Matt. 25.
The nation far and near contend in choice.
2.
Figuratively, remote from purpose; contrary to design or wishes; as, far be it from me to justify cruelty.
3.
Remote in affection or obedience; at enmity with; alienated; in a spiritual sense.
They that are far from thee shall perish. Ps. 123.
4.
More or most distant of the two; as the far side of a horse. But the drivers of teams in New England generally use off; as the off side, or off horse or ox.

F'AR

, adv.
1.
To a great extent or distance of space; as the far extended ocean; we are separated far from each other.
Only ye shall not go very far away. Ex. 8.
2.
figuratively, distantly in time from any point; remotely. He pushed his researches very far into antiquity.
3.
In interrogatories, to what distance or extent. How far will such reasoning lead us?
4.
In great part; as, the day is far spent.
5.
In a great proportion; by many degrees; very much.
Who can find a virtuous woman? for her price is far above rubies. Prov. 31.
For I am in a strait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to be with Christ, which is far better. Phil. 1.
6.
to a certain point, degree or distance. This argument is sound and logical, as far as it goes.
Answer them how far forth you do like their articles.
From far, from a great distance; from a remote place.
Far from, at a great distance; as far from home; far from hope.
1.
Far off, at a great distance.
They tarried in a place that was far off. 2Sam. 15.
2.
To a great distance.
Lo then would I wander far off, and remain in the wilderness. Ps. 105.
3.
In a spiritual sense, alienated; at enmity; in a state of ignorance and alienation.
Ye, who were sometime far off, are made nigh by the blood of Christ. Eph. 2.
Far other, very different.

Definition 2022


Far

Far

See also: far, fár, får, fær, and far-

Luxembourgish

Noun

Far m (plural Faren)

  1. fern

far

far

See also: fár, får, fær, far-, and Far

English

Adjective

far (comparative farther or further, superlative farthest or furthest or farthermost or furthermost)

  1. (obsolete, Scotland, Northern England) Distant.
    A far land.
  2. Remote in space.
    He went to a far country.
  3. Remote in time.
  4. Long.
    It was a far adventure, full of danger.
  5. More remote or longer of two.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 19, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      At the far end of the houses the head gardener stood waiting for his mistress, and he gave her strips of bass to tie up her nosegay. This she did slowly and laboriously, with knuckly old fingers that shook.
    He moved to the far end of the state. She remained at this end.
  6. Extreme.
    We are on the far right on this issue.
  7. Widely different in nature or quality; opposite in character.
    • F. Anstey
      He was far from ill looking, though he thought himself still farther.
  8. (computing, not comparable) Outside the currently selected segment in a segmented memory architecture.
    far heap;  far memory; far pointer
Antonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

Adverb

far (comparative farther or further, superlative farthest or furthest)

  1. Distant in space, time or degree.
    My house is quite far from the beach. The plan is good, but it is far from being flawless.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapter1:
      It was not far from the house; but the ground sank into a depression there, and the ridge of it behind shut out everything except just the roof of the tallest hayrick. As one sat on the sward behind the elm, with the back turned on the rick and nothing in front but the tall elms and the oaks in the other hedge, it was quite easy to fancy it the verge of the prairie with the backwoods close by.
  2. To or from a great distance, time, or degree.
    You have all come far and you will go farther.
  3. (with a comparative) Very much.
    He was far richer than we'd thought.
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport:
      The Reds were on the back foot early on when a catalogue of defensive errors led to Ramires giving Chelsea the lead. Jay Spearing conceded possession in midfield and Ramires escaped Jose Enrique far too easily before scoring at the near post with a shot Reina should have saved.

Translations

Noun

far (plural fars)

  1. Spelt (type of wheat).
  2. A young pig, or a litter of pigs.

Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: few · whom · love · #180: far · seemed · house · looked

Anagrams


Albanian

Etymology

From Latin Pharus.

Noun

far m

  1. lighthouse

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin Pharus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /far/, /faɾ/
  • Rhymes: -aɾ

Noun

far m (plural fars)

  1. lighthouse
  2. headlight

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father).

Noun

far c (singular definite faren, plural indefinite fædre)

  1. father, dad

Synonyms

Inflection

Related terms


Esperanto

Etymology

Back-formation from fari (to do, to make).

Preposition

far

  1. (neologism) by[1]
    La libro de Johano far Ŝekspiro
    John's book by Shakespeare)
    regado de la popolo, far la popolo, kaj por la popolo
    government of the people, by the people, and for the people

Usage notes

Unofficial. The most common innovative preposition, far is used for some of the functions of the preposition de "of, from, by", which some authors feel is overworked. Useful to distinguish, for example, the owner of a book (de) from the author (far).

References

  1. Wennergren, Bertilo (2010-03-09), “Neoficialaj rolvortetoj”, in Plena Manlibro de Esperanta Gramatiko (in Esperanto), retrieved 2010-10-08

Faliscan

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰars- ‘spike, prickle’. Cognate with Latin far.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfar/

Noun

far n

  1. emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccum)

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse far.

Noun

far n (genitive singular fars, plural før)

  1. drive, ride, tour
  2. vessel
  3. trace, sign

Declension

n5 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative far farið før førini
Accusative far farið før førini
Dative fari farinum førum førunum
Genitive fars farsins fara faranna

Derived terms


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faʁ/

Noun

far m (plural fars)

  1. A traditional Breton cake

Hungarian

Etymology

Maybe from the same Proto-Uralic root *perä as Finnish perä.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɒr]

Noun

far (plural farok)

  1. buttock, posterior
  2. stern (ship)
  3. tail, rear (vehicle)

Declension

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative far farok
accusative fart farokat
dative farnak faroknak
instrumental farral farokkal
causal-final farért farokért
translative farrá farokká
terminative farig farokig
essive-formal farként farokként
essive-modal
inessive farban farokban
superessive faron farokon
adessive farnál faroknál
illative farba farokba
sublative farra farokra
allative farhoz farokhoz
elative farból farokból
delative farról farokról
ablative fartól faroktól
Possessive forms of far
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. farom faraim
2nd person sing. farod faraid
3rd person sing. fara farai
1st person plural farunk faraink
2nd person plural farotok faraitok
3rd person plural faruk faraik

Derived terms

(Compound words):


Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faːr/
  • Rhymes: -aːr

Noun

far n (genitive singular fars, nominative plural för)

  1. passage, ride
    Má ég fá far?
    Can I get a ride?
  2. imprint, trace
  3. character, personality

Declension

Derived terms

  • fá far (to get a ride, to get a lift)
  • gera sér far um
  • hjakka í sama farinu
  • í fari hans
  • sækja í sama farið

Synonyms

See also

Anagrams


Italian

Verb

far

  1. apocopic form of fare

Anagrams


Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰars (spike, prickle) (compare Welsh bara (bread), English barley, Serbo-Croatian бра̏шно/brȁšno ‘flour’, Albanian bar (grass), Ancient Greek Φήρον (Phḗron, plant deity)).

Pronunciation

Noun

far n (genitive farris); third declension

  1. spelt (type of wheat)
  2. coarse meal; grits

Inflection

Third declension neuter i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative far farra
genitive farris farrium
farrum
dative farrī farribus
accusative far farra
ablative farre farribus
vocative far farra

Derived terms

  • farreārius
  • farreātus
  • farreus
  • farriculum

Descendants


Lojban

Rafsi

far

  1. rafsi of farna.

Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic فَأْر (faʾr, mouse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɐːr/

Noun

far m (plural firien)

  1. mouse

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father). Compare longer version fader.

Noun

far m (definite singular faren, indefinite plural fedre, definite plural fedrene)

  1. a father
Synonyms
Derived terms
Related terms

Etymology 2

Verb

far

  1. imperative of fare

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father). Compare longer version fader.

Noun

far m (definite singular faren, indefinite plural fedrar, definite plural fedrane)

  1. father

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms


Occitan

Verb

far

  1. Alternative form of faire

Old Irish

Determiner

far

  1. Alternative form of for

Old Provençal

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin facere, present active infinitive of faciō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /far/

Verb

far

  1. to do
    • c. 1130, Jaufre Rudel, canso:
      Dieus que fetz tot qunt ve ni vai / E formet sest'amor de lonh / Mi don poder [...].
      God, who makes everything that comes or goes and who created this distant love, give me power.
Descendants

Old Swedish

Etymology

From (eastern) Old Norse *fāʀ (Old West Norse fær), from Proto-Germanic *fahaz.

Noun

fār n

  1. sheep

Declension

Descendants


Romanian

Etymology

Borrowing from Latin Pharus, French phare.

Noun

far n (plural faruri)

  1. lighthouse
  2. (figuratively) beacon
  3. car headlight

Declension


Romansch

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin faciō, facere.

Verb

far

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) to do, make

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology 1

Conjunction

far

  1. where (relative/non-interrogative)
    Bha e cunnartach far an robh am balach ag iasgach. - It was dangerous where the boy was fishing.

Etymology 2

Preposition

far

  1. Alternative form of bhàrr

Swedish

Etymology

Short for fader, from Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father).

Pronunciation

Noun

far c

  1. father

Declension

Related terms

Verb

far

  1. imperative of fara.
  2. present tense of fara.

References


Turkish

Etymology 1

Borrowing from French phare.

Noun

far (definite accusative farı, plural farlar)

  1. headlight

Etymology 2

Borrowing from French fard.

Noun

far (definite accusative farı, plural farlar)

  1. eye shadow
Declension
Synonyms
  • (eye shadow): göz farı

Venetian

Etymology

From Latin facere (compare Italian fare), present active infinitive of faciō.

Verb

far

  1. (transitive) to do
  2. (transitive) to make
  3. (transitive) to act, operate
  4. (transitive) to study


Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [faɾ]

Noun

far (plural fars)

  1. lighthouse

Declension

Synonyms

See also

  • laramamalet
  • lefilamalet
  • malet
  • maletam
  • maletadomil
  • maletahorn
  • maletamöp
  • tüm