Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Talk

Talk

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To speak freely; to use for conversing or communicating;
as, to
talk
French
.
2.
To deliver in talking; to speak; to utter; to make a subject of conversation;
as, to
talk
nonsense; to
talk
politics
.
3.
To consume or spend in talking; – often followed by away;
as, to
talk
away an evening
.
4.
To cause to be or become by talking.
“They would talk themselves mad.”
Shak.
To talk over
.
(a)
To talk about; to have conference respecting; to deliberate upon; to discuss;
as, to
talk over
a matter or plan
.
(b)
To change the mind or opinion of by talking; to convince;
as, to
talk over
an opponent
.

Talk

,
Noun.
1.
The act of talking; especially, familiar converse; mutual discourse; that which is uttered, especially in familiar conversation, or the mutual converse of two or more.
In various
talk
the instructive hours they passed.
Pope.
Their
talk
, when it was not made up of nautical phrases, was too commonly made up of oaths and curses.
Macaulay.
2.
Report; rumor;
as, to hear
talk
of war
.
I hear a
talk
up and down of raising our money.
Locke.
3.
Subject of discourse;
as, his achievment is the
talk
of the town
.
Syn. – Conversation; colloquy; discourse; chat; dialogue; conference; communication. See
Conversation
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Talk

TALK

,
Verb.
I.
tauk.
1.
To converse familiarly; to speak, as in familiar discourse, when two or more persons interchange thoughts.
I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you; but I will not eat with you.
In Aesop's time
When all things talk'd, and talk'd in rhyme.
I will come down and talk with thee. Num.11.
Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way? Luke 24.
2.
To prate; to speak impertinently.
3.
To talk of, to relate; to tell; to give account. Authors talk of the wonderful remains of Palmyra.
The natural histories of Switzerland talk much of the fall of these rocks, and the great damage done.
So shall I talk of thy wondrous works. Ps.119.
4.
To speak; to reason; to confer.
Let me talk with thee of thy judgments. Jer.12.
To talk to, in familiar language, to advise or exhort; or to reprove gently. I will talk to my son respecting his conduct.

TALK

,
Noun.
tauk. Familiar converse; mutual discourse; that which is uttered by one person in familiar conversation, or the mutual converse of two or more.
Should a man full of talk be justified? Job 11.
In various talk th' instructive hours they past.
1.
Report; rumor.
I hear a talk up and down of raising money.
2.
Subject of discourse. This noble achievement is the talk of the whole town.
3.
Among the Indians of North America, a public conference, as respecting peace or war, negotiation and the like; or an official verbal communication made from them to another nation or its agents, or made to them by the same.

TALK

, a mineral. [See Talck.]

Definition 2021


Talk

Talk

See also: talk

German

Noun

Talk m (genitive Talks or Talkes, no plural)

  1. talc

Declension

talk

talk

See also: Talk

English

Noun

talk (plural talks)

  1. A conversation or discussion; usually serious, but informal.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 12, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      All this was extraordinarily distasteful to Churchill. [] Never before had he felt such repulsion when the vicar displayed his characteristic bluntness or coarseness of speech. In the present connexionor rather as a transition from the subject that started their conversationsuch talk had been distressingly out of place.
    We need to have a talk about your homework.
  2. A lecture.
    There's a talk about Shakespeare on tonight.
  3. (preceded by the) A major topic of social discussion.
    She is the talk of the day.   The musical is the talk of the town.
  4. (not preceded by an article) Empty boasting, promises or claims.
    The party leader's speech was all talk.
  5. Meeting to discuss a particular matter.
    The leaders of the G8 nations are currently in talks over nuclear weapons.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

talk (third-person singular simple present talks, present participle talking, simple past and past participle talked)

  1. (transitive) To communicate, usually by means of speech.
    • William Shakespeare
      I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following, but I will not eat with you.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 4, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Then he commenced to talk, really talk. and inside of two flaps of a herring's fin he had me mesmerized, like Eben Holt's boy at the town hall show. He talked about the ills of humanity, and the glories of health and Nature and service and land knows what all. [] It was a chance he was offering me, a wonderful, eighteen carat, solid gold chance.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, in The China Governess:
      Mr. Campion appeared suitably impressed and she warmed to him. He was very easy to talk to with those long clown lines in his pale face, a natural goon, born rather too early she suspected.
    Although I don't speak Chinese I managed to talk with the villagers using signs and gestures.
    They sat down to talk business.   We talk French sometimes.
  2. (transitive, informal) To discuss.
    They sat down to talk business.   We're not talking rocket science here: it should be easy.
  3. (intransitive, slang) To confess, especially implicating others.
    Suppose he talks?   She can be relied upon not to talk.   They tried to make me talk.
  4. (intransitive) To criticize someone for something of which one is guilty oneself.
    I am not the one to talk.   She is a fine one to talk.   You should talk.   Look who's talking.
  5. (intransitive) To gossip; to create scandal.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 13, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      []  They talk of you as if you were Croesus—and I expect the beggars sponge on you unconscionably. And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes.
    People will talk.   Aren't you afraid the neighbours will talk?

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • See also Wikisaurus:talk

Coordinate terms

Derived terms

Translations

Related terms

Look at pages starting with talk.

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: answer · early · saying · #449: talk · spirit · sometimes · account

Danish

Etymology

Via French talc or German Talk, from Persian طلق (talq).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /talk/, [tˢalˀɡ̊]

Noun

talk c (singular definite talken, not used in plural form)

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Related terms


Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

talk m (uncountable)

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Anagrams


Polish

Noun

talk m inan

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Declension


Swedish

Noun

talk c

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Declension