Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Both

Both

(bōth)
,
Adj.
or p
ron.
[OE.
bothe
,
baþe
, fr. Icel.
bāðir
; akin to Dan.
baade
, Sw.
båda
, Goth.
bajōþs
, OHG.
beidē
,
bēdē
, G. & D.
beide
, also AS.
begen
,
bā
,
bū
, Goth.
bai
, and Gr.
ἄμφω
, L.
ambo
, Lith.
abà
, OSlav.
oba
, Skr.
ubha
. √310. Cf.
Amb-
.]
The one and the other; the two; the pair, without exception of either.
☞ It is generally used adjectively with nouns; as, both horses ran away; but with pronouns, and often with nous, it is used substantively, and followed by of.
It frequently stands as a pronoun.
She alone is heir to
both
of us.
Shakespeare
Abraham took sheep and oxen, and gave them unto Abimelech; and
both
of them made a covenant.
Gen. xxi. 27.
He will not bear the loss of his rank, because he can bear the loss of his estate; but he will bear
both
, because he is prepared for
both
.
Bolingbroke.
It is often used in apposition with nouns or pronouns.
Thy weal and woe are
both
of them extremes.
Shakespeare
This said, they
both
betook them several ways.
Milton.
Both now always precedes any other attributive words; as, both their armies; both our eyes.
Both of is used before pronouns in the objective case; as, both of us, them, whom, etc.; but before substantives its used is colloquial, both (without of) being the preferred form; as, both the brothers.

Both

,
c
onj.
As well; not only; equally.
Both precedes the first of two coördinate words or phrases, and is followed by and before the other, both . . . and . . . ; as well the one as the other; not only this, but also that; equally the former and the latter. It is also sometimes followed by more than two coördinate words, connected by and expressed or understood.
To judge
both
quick and dead.
Milton.
A masterpiece
both
for argument and style.
Goldsmith.
To whom
bothe
heven and erthe and see is sene.
Chaucer.
Both
mongrel, puppy, whelp, and hound.
Goldsmith.
He prayeth well who loveth well
Both
man and bird and beast.
Coleridge.

Webster 1828 Edition


Both

BOTH

,
Adj.
Two, considered as distinct from others or by themselves; the one and the other.
This word is often placed before the nouns with which it is connected.
He understands how to manage both public and private concerns.
It is often used as a substitute for nouns.
And Abraham took sheep and oxen, and gave them to Abimelech; and both of them made a covenant. Gen.21.
Both often represents two members of a sentence.
He will not bear the loss of his rank, because he can bear the loss of his estate; but he will bear both, because he is prepared for both.
Both often pertains to adjectives or attributes,and in this case generally precedes them in construction; as, he endeavored to render commerce both disadvantageous and infamous.

Definition 2022


Both

Both

See also: both and boð

English

Proper noun

Both

  1. A surname.

Derived terms

both

both

English

Alternative forms

Determiner

both

  1. Each of the two; one and the other; referring to two individuals or items
    "Did you want this one or that one?" — "Give me both."
    Both children are such dolls.
    • Bible, Genesis xxi. 27
      Abraham took sheep and oxen, and gave them unto Abimelech; and both of them made a covenant.
    • Viscount Bolingbroke (1678-1751)
      He will not bear the loss of his rank, because he can bear the loss of his estate; but he will bear both, because he is prepared for both.
  2. Each of the two kinds; one and the other kind; referring to several individuals or items which are divided into two groups
    I ate five strawberry sweets and three chocolate sweets. Both were very tasty.
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.   Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.

Translations

Conjunction

both

  1. including both of (used with and)
    Both you and I are students.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, An Autobiography, Part II, chapter4:
      Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. There was a great deal of them, lavish both in material and in workmanship.
  2. (obsolete) including all of (used with and).

Translations

Quotations

  • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:both.

See also

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: thing · set · told · #197: both · having · look · heard

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish both (hut, bothy, cot; cabin), from Proto-Celtic *butā (compare Middle Welsh bot (dwelling)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to be).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bˠɔh/, /bˠɔ/

Noun

both f (genitive singular botha, nominative plural bothanna)

  1. booth, hut

Declension

Alternative declension

Derived terms

  • bothach (hutted, full of huts, adj)
  • bothán m (shanty, cabin; hut, shed, coop)
  • bothchampa m (hutment)
  • bothóg f (shanty, cabin)

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
both bhoth mboth
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

  • "both" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 2 both” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Old Irish

Verb

·both

  1. preterite passive conjunct of at·tá