Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Sod

Sod

,
Noun.
(Zool.)
The rock dove.
[Prov. Eng.]

Sod

,
obs.
imp.
of
Seethe
.

Sod

,
Noun.
[Akin to LG.
sode
, D.
zode
, OD.
sode
,
soode
, OFries. satha, and E.
seethe
. So named from its
sodden
state in wet weather. See
Seethe
.]
That stratum of the surface of the soil which is filled with the roots of grass, or any portion of that surface; turf; sward.
She there shall dress a sweeter
sod

Than Fancy’s feet have ever trod.
Collins.

Sod

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Sodden
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Sodding
.]
To cover with sod; to turf.

Webster 1828 Edition


Sod

SOD

,
Noun.
Turf; sward; that stratum of earth on the surface which is filled with the roots of grass, or any portion of that surface. It differs from clod, which may be compact mass of earth without roots; but sod is formed by earth held together by roots.

Definition 2022


sod

sod

See also: SOD, sód, sød, and soð

English

Workers laying sod.

Noun

sod (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) That stratum of the surface of the soil which is filled with the roots of grass, or any portion of that surface; turf; sward.
    • Collins
      She there shall dress a sweeter sod / Than Fancy's feet have ever trod.
  2. Turf grown and cut specifically for the establishment of lawns.
    The landscapers rolled sod onto the bare earth and made a presentable lawn by nightfall.
Related terms
Translations

Verb

sod (third-person singular simple present sods, present participle sodding, simple past and past participle sodded)

  1. To cover with sod.
    He sodded the worn areas twice a year.
Translations

Etymology 2

From sodomize, by shortening

Noun

sod (plural sods)

  1. (Britain, vulgar) Sodomite; bugger.
  2. (Britain, slang, mildly pejorative, formerly considered vulgar) A person, usually male; often qualified with an adjective.
    You mean old sod!
    poor sod
    unlucky sod
Derived terms

Interjection

sod

  1. (Britain, vulgar) expression of surprise, contempt, outrage, disgust, boredom, frustration.

Verb

sod (third-person singular simple present sods, present participle sodding, simple past and past participle sodded)

  1. (transitive, Britain, slang, vulgar) Bugger; sodomize.
  2. (transitive, Britain, slang, vulgar) Damn, curse, confound.
    Sod him!, Sod it!, Sod that bastard!
Derived terms

Etymology 3

Originally a back-formation from the past participle sodden.

Verb

sod

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense of seethe

Adjective

sod (comparative more sod, superlative most sod)

  1. (obsolete) Boiled.
  2. (Australia, of bread) Sodden; incompletely risen.
    sod damper

Noun

sod (plural sods)

  1. (Australia, colloquial) A damper (bread) which has failed to rise, remaining a flat lump.
    • 1954, Tom Ronan, Vision Splendid, quoted in Tom Burton, Words in Your Ear, Wakefield Press (1999), ISBN 1-86254-475-1, page 120:
      And Mart the cook the shovel took / And swung the damper to and fro. / 'Another sod, so help me God, / That's fourteen in a flamin' row.

Etymology 4

Noun

sod (plural sods)

  1. The rock dove.

Anagrams


Breton

Noun

sod m

  1. imbecile

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse sót (soot).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /soːd/, [soðˀ]
  • Rhymes: -oð

Noun

sod c (singular definite soden, not used in plural form)

  1. soot

Verb

sod

  1. imperative of sode

Lojban

Rafsi

sod

  1. rafsi of sodva.

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *sǫdъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsóːt/
  • Tonal orthography: sọ̑d

Noun

sód m inan (genitive sóda, nominative plural sódi or sodôvi)

  1. barrel

Declension


Volapük

Noun

sod (plural sods)

  1. sauce

Declension