Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Sole

Sole

,
Noun.
[F.
sole
, L.
solea
; – so named from its flat shape. See
Sole
of the foot.]
(Zool.)
(a)
Any one of several species of flatfishes of the genus
Solea
and allied genera of the family
Soleidae
, especially the common European species (
Solea vulgaris
), which is a valuable food fish.
(b)
Any one of several American flounders somewhat resembling the true sole in form or quality, as the California sole (
Lepidopsetta bilineata
), the long-finned sole (
Glyptocephalus zachirus
), and other species.
Lemon
, or
French
,
sole
(Zool.)
,
a European species of sole (
Solea pegusa
).
Smooth sole
(Zool.)
,
the megrim.

Sole

(sōl)
,
Noun.
[AS.
sole
, fr. L.
soolea
(or rather an assumed L.
sola
), akin to
solum
round, soil, sole of the foot. Cf.
Exile
,
Saloon
,
Soil
earth,
Sole
the fish.]
1.
The bottom of the foot; hence, also, rarely, the foot itself.
The dove found no rest for the
sole
of her foot.
Gen. viii. 9.
Hast wandered through the world now long a day,
Yet ceasest not thy weary
soles
to lead.
Spenser.
2.
The bottom of a shoe or boot, or the piece of leather which constitutes the bottom.
The “caliga” was a military shoe, with a very thick
sole
, tied above the instep.
Arbuthnot.
3.
The bottom or lower part of anything, or that on which anything rests in standing.
Specifially:
(a)
(Agric.)
The bottom of the body of a plow; – called also
slade
; also, the bottom of a furrow.
(b)
(Far.)
The horny substance under a horse’s foot, which protects the more tender parts.
(c)
(Fort.)
The bottom of an embrasure.
(d)
(Naut.)
A piece of timber attached to the lower part of the rudder, to make it even with the false keel.
Totten.
(e)
(Mining)
The seat or bottom of a mine; – applied to horizontal veins or lodes.
Sole leather
,
thick, strong, used for making the soles of boots and shoes, and for other purposes.

Sole

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Soled
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Soling
.]
To furnish with a sole;
as, to
sole
a shoe
.

Sole

,
Adj.
[L.
solus
, or OF.
sol
, F.
seul
(fr. L.
solus
; cf. L.
sollus
whole, entire. Cf.
Desolate
,
Solemn
,
Solo
,
Sullen
.]
1.
Being or acting without another; single; individual; only.
“The sole son of my queen.”
Shak.
He, be sure . . . first and last will reign
Sole
king.
Milton.
2.
(Law)
Single; unmarried;
as, a feme
sole
.
Corporation sole
.
See the Note under
Corporation
.
Syn. – Single; individual; only; alone; solitary.

Webster 1828 Edition


Sole

SOLE

,
Noun.
[L. solea, solum; that which sets or is set or laid. The radical sense coincides with that of sill.]
1.
The bottom of the foot; and by a figure, the foot itselft.
2.
The bottom of the shoe; or the piece of lether which constitutes the bottom. The cliga was a military show with a very thick sole, tied above the instep.
3.
The part of any thing that forms the bottom, and on which it stands upon the ground. Elms is proper for mills, soles for wheels, and pipes.
4.
A marine fish of the genus Pleurinectes, so called probably because it keeps on or near the bottom of the sea. These fish abound on the British coast, and hence the name of sole bank, to the southward of Ireland. This fish sometimes grows to the weight of six or seven pounds.
5.
In ship-building, a sort of lining, used to prevent the wearing of any thing.
6.
A sort of horn under a horse's hoof.

Definition 2021


Sole

Sole

See also: sole, solé, solę, søle, sołe, and so le

German

Noun

Sole f (genitive Sole, plural Solen)

  1. brine

sole

sole

See also: Sole, solé, solę, søle, sołe, and so le

English

Noun

sole (plural soles)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) A wooden band or yoke put around the neck of an ox or cow in the stall.

Etymology 2

From Middle English, from Old English sol (mire, miry place), from Proto-Germanic *sulą (mire, wallow, mud), from Proto-Indo-European *sūl- (thick liquid). Cognate with Saterland Frisian soal (ditch), Dutch sol (water and mud filled pit), German Suhle (mire, wallow), Norwegian saula, søyla (mud puddle). More at soil.

Alternative forms

Noun

sole (plural soles)

  1. (dialectal, Northern England) A pond or pool; a dirty pond of standing water.

Etymology 3

From earlier sowle (to pull by the ear). Origin unknown. Perhaps from sow (female pig) + -le, as in the phrase "take a sow by the wrong ear", or from Middle English sole (rope). See above.

Alternative forms

Verb

sole (third-person singular simple present soles, present participle soling, simple past and past participle soled)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To pull by the ears; to pull about; haul; lug.

Etymology 4

From Middle English sole, soule, from Old French sol, soul (alone), from Latin sōlus (alone, single, solitary, lonely), of unknown origin. Perhaps related to Old Latin sollus (whole, complete), from Proto-Indo-European *solw-, *salw-, *slōw- (safe, healthy). More at save.

Adjective

sole (not comparable)

  1. only
  2. (law) unmarried (especially of a woman); widowed.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 5

From Middle English sole, soole, from Old English. Reinforced by Anglo-Norman, Old French sole, from Vulgar Latin *sola ("bottom of the shoe", also "flatfish"), from Latin solea (sandal, bottom of the shoe), from Proto-Indo-European *swol- (sole). Cognate with Dutch zool (sole, tread), German Sohle (sole, insole, bottom, floor), Danish sål (sole), Icelandic sóli (sole, outsole), Gothic 𐍃𐌿𐌻𐌾𐌰 (sulja, sandal). Related to Latin solum (bottom, ground, soil). More at soil.

Noun

sole (plural soles)

The sole of a man's foot
  1. (anatomy) The bottom or plantar surface of the foot.
  2. (footwear) The bottom of a shoe or boot.
    • Arbuthnot
      The caliga was a military shoe, with a very thick sole, tied above the instep.
  3. (obsolete) The foot itself.
    • Bible, Genesis viii. 9
      The dove found no rest for the sole of her foot.
    • Spenser
      Hast wandered through the world now long a day, / Yet ceasest not thy weary soles to lead.
  4. Solea solea, a flatfish of the family Soleidae.
  5. The bottom or lower part of anything, or that on which anything rests in standing.
    1. The bottom of the body of a plough; the slade.
    2. The bottom of a furrow.
    3. The end section of the chanter of a set of bagpipes.
    4. The horny substance under a horse's foot, which protects the more tender parts.
    5. (military) The bottom of an embrasure.
    6. (nautical) A piece of timber attached to the lower part of the rudder, to make it even with the false keel.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  6. (mining) The seat or bottom of a mine; applied to horizontal veins or lodes.
Synonyms
  • (bottom of the foot): planta (medical term)
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

sole (third-person singular simple present soles, present participle soling, simple past and past participle soled)

  1. (transitive) to put a sole on (a shoe or boot)
Derived terms
Translations

Anagrams


Danish

Noun

sole c

  1. plural indefinite of sol

Esperanto

Adverb

sole

  1. solely

Related terms


French

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *sola, from Latin solea.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɔl/

Noun

sole f (plural soles)

  1. sole (fish)
  2. sole, the bottom of a hoof
  3. sole, a piece of timber, a joist
  4. a piece of land devoted to crop rotation

Interlingue

Noun

sole

  1. sun

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsole]

Etymology 1

From Latin sōl, solem, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Noun

sole m (plural soli)

  1. sun
Related terms
See also

Etymology 2

Inflected forms

Adjective

sole f

  1. feminine plural of solo

Noun

sole f

  1. plural of sola

Anagrams


Latin

Etymology 1

See sōl.

Pronunciation

Noun

sōle

  1. ablative singular of sōl

Etymology 2

See sōlus.

Pronunciation

Adjective

sōle

  1. vocative masculine singular of sōlus

Neapolitan

Etymology

From Latin sol.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsolɐ/

Noun

sole m

  1. the Sun, the star around which the Earth revolves (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Norman

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *sola, from Latin solea.

Noun

sole f (plural soles)

  1. sole (fish)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Probably from the noun sol

Verb

sole (imperative sol, present tense soler, passive -, simple past sola or solet or solte, past participle sola or solet or solt, present participle solende)

  1. (reflexive) sole seg - to sunbathe, sun oneself, bask (also figurative)

References


Old French

Adjective

sole f

  1. oblique feminine singular of sol
  2. nominative feminine singular of sol

Polish

Pronunciation

Noun

sole

  1. nominative plural of sól
  2. accusative plural of sól
  3. vocative plural of sól
  4. nominative plural of sola
  5. accusative plural of sola
  6. vocative plural of sola
  7. nominative plural of sol
  8. accusative plural of sol
  9. vocative plural of sol