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Webster 1913 Edition


Don

Don

(dŏn)
,
Noun.
[Sp.
don
; akin to Pg.
dom
, It.
donno
; fr. L.
dominus
master. See
Dame
, and cf.
Domine
,
Dominie
,
Domino
,
Dan
,
Dom
.]
1.
Sir; Mr; Signior; – a title in Spain, formerly given to noblemen and gentlemen only, but now common to all classes.
Don
is used in Italy, though not so much as in Spain. France talks of
Dom
Calmet, England of
Dan
Lydgate.
Oliphant.
2.
A grand personage, or one making pretension to consequence; especially, the head of a college, or one of the fellows at the English universities.
[Univ. Cant]
“The great dons of wit.”
Dryden.

Don

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Donned
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Donning
.]
[
Do
+
on
; – opposed to
doff
. See
Do
,
Verb.
T.
, 7.]
To put on; to dress in; to invest one’s self with.
Should I
don
this robe and trouble you.
Shakespeare
At night, or in the rain,
He
dons
a surcoat which he doffs at morn.
Emerson.

Webster 1828 Edition


Don

DON.

A title in Spain, formerly given to noblemen and gentlemen only, but now common to all classes. It is commonly supposed to be contracted from dominus, dom, and the Portuguese dono, the master or owner of any thing, gives some countenance to the opinion. It coincides nearly with Heb.: judge, ruler or lord. It was formerly used in England, and writter by Chaucer Dan. [See Spelman.]
Dona, or duena, the feminine of don, is the title of a lady, in Spain and Portugal.
DON, v.t. [To do on; opposed to doff.] To put on; to invest with.

Definition 2022


Don

Don

See also: don, DON, doń, doň, don', don-, do'n, and đơn

English

Proper noun

Don

  1. A diminutive of the male given name Donald or Gordon.

Etymology 2

Proper noun

Don in Rostov oblast

Don

  1. A river in European Russia, flowing 1200 miles to the Sea of Azov. Called Tanais in classical sources.
Translations

See also

Etymology 3

Proper noun

Don

  1. A river in Scotland, flowing 62 miles to the North Sea.
Translations

Anagrams


Dutch

Pronunciation

Proper noun

Don m

  1. Don, river in Russia.

Finnish

Proper noun

Don

  1. Don (river in Russia)

Declension

Inflection of Don (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative Don
genitive Donin
partitive Donia
illative Doniin
singular plural
nominative Don
accusative nom. Don
gen. Donin
genitive Donin
partitive Donia
inessive Donissa
elative Donista
illative Doniin
adessive Donilla
ablative Donilta
allative Donille
essive Donina
translative Doniksi
instructive
abessive Donitta
comitative

German

Proper noun

Don m

  1. Don (river in Russia)

Noun

Don m

  1. don (honorific title, especially in Spain and Italy)

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈdon]

Proper noun

Don

  1. Don (river in Russia)

Declension

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative Don
accusative Dont
dative Donnak
instrumental Donnal
causal-final Donért
translative Donná
terminative Donig
essive-formal Donként
essive-modal
inessive Donban
superessive Donon
adessive Donnál
illative Donba
sublative Donra
allative Donhoz
elative Donból
delative Donról
ablative Dontól
Possessive forms of Don
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. Donom
2nd person sing. Donod
3rd person sing. Donja
1st person plural Donunk
2nd person plural Donotok
3rd person plural Donjuk

Italian

Proper noun

Don ?

  1. A river that flows in Russia

Polish

Proper noun

Don m

  1. Don (river in Russia)

Declension


Portuguese

Proper noun

Don m

  1. Don (a river in southwestern Russia)

Spanish

Etymology

From don, from Late Latin domnus, from Latin dominus (lord), from domus (house).

Noun

Don m (plural Dones, feminine Doña)

  1. (obsolete) A title of respect to a nobleman (similar to English lord).
  2. A title of respect to a man, comparable to Mr., but used before a given name.

Usage notes

May be written with upper- or lowercase.

Abbreviations

See also

don

don

See also: Don, DON, doń, doň, don', don-, do'n, and đơn

English

Noun

don (plural dons)

  1. A university professor, particularly one at Oxford or Cambridge.
  2. A mafia boss.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

A contraction of Middle English do on. Compare also doff.

Verb

don (third-person singular simple present dons, present participle donning, simple past and past participle donned)

  1. (clothing) to put on, to dress in
    To don one's clothes.
Antonyms
  • (put on clothes): doff
Translations
See also

Anagrams


Breton

Adjective

don

  1. deep

Czech

Etymology

From Spanish don, from Latin dominus (lord).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdon/
  • Rhymes: -on

Noun

don m anim

  1. (in Italian environment) Originally a title of honour of the Pope, later used for all priests and later for aristocrats.
    don Giovanni
  2. Spanish noble title. [19th c.]
  3. title of respect in front of Spanish given names
    don José
  4. don (maffia boss)
    • 2003, Miroslav Nožina, Mezinárodní organizovaný zločin v České republice, Themis, ISBN 8073120186, page 156:
      Roku 1876 mafiánský don Raffaele Palizollo reformoval dosavadní strategii nevměšování se mafie do veřejného života.
      In 1876 mafia don Raffaele Palizollo reformed the previous strategy of mafia not interfering into public affairs.
    • 2012, Hana Pernicová (translator), Kolumbova záhada, Ostrava: Domino, translation of original by Steve Berry, ISBN 978-80-7303-743-7, page 412:
      Simon se zatvářil stejně jako drogový don před čtyřmi dny.
      Simon had the same expression as the drug mafia don four days ago.

Declension

Related terms

Anagrams


Dupaninan Agta

Noun

don

  1. leaf of a plant

French

Etymology

From Latin donum.

Pronunciation

Noun

don m (plural dons)

  1. gift, talent
  2. gift (present)
  3. donation

Irish

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d̪ˠənˠ/
  • (Galway) IPA(key): /ɡənˠ/

Contraction

don

  1. Contraction of do an.
    Thug mé don bhuachaill é. ― I gave it to the boy.
    Tá mé ag dul don Spáinn. ― I'm going to Spain.
Usage notes

This contraction is obligatory, i.e. *do an never appears uncontracted. It triggers lenition of a following consonant other than d, s, or t.

Related terms

Etymology 2

From Old Irish don (misfortune, evil).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d̪ˠɔnˠ/
  • (Ulster) IPA(key): /d̪ˠʌnˠ/

Noun

don

  1. misfortune
Usage notes

Used only in a few stock maledictions such as Do dhon is do dhuais ort!, Don is duais ort!, Mo dhon is mo dhograinn ort! (all basically "bad luck to you!") and Don d’fhiafraí ort! (Don’t be so inquisitive!).

Derived terms

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
don dhon ndon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian

Etymology

From a shortening of an earlier donno, from dom'no (used by Dante), from Latin domnus < dominus.

Noun

don m (inv)

  1. Father (a title given to priests)
  2. A title of respect to a man.

Lojban

Rafsi

don

  1. rafsi of do.

Nigerian Pidgin

Etymology

From English done.

Verb

don

  1. have (perfect aspect auxiliary)
    Wi don chop = "We have eaten"

Northern Sami

Pronoun

don

  1. you (thou)

Inflection

Inflection of don (irregular)
Nominative don
Genitive du
Nominative don
Genitive du
Accusative du
Illative dutnje
Locative dus
Comitative duinna
Essive dunin

See also

Personal pronouns
singular dual plural
1st person mun moai mii
2nd person don doai dii
3rd person son soai sii

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *dōną (to do), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to make, do, place). Cognate with Old Frisian dūa, duā, dwā (West Frisian dwaan), Old Saxon dōn, doan, duan, duon, Old Dutch duon (Dutch doen), Old High German tuon (German tun); and, outside the Germanic languages, with Ancient Greek τίθημι (títhēmi), Latin faciō, Old Irish dorat (Irish déan), Old Church Slavonic дѣти (děti).

Pronunciation

Verb

dōn

  1. to do

Conjugation

Descendants

  • Middle English: don
    • English: to do
    • Scots: dae

Old Irish

Noun

don ?

  1. misfortune, evil

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants


Old Saxon

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *dōną. Compare Old English dōn, Old Frisian dūa, duā, dwā, Old Dutch duon, Old High German tuon.

Verb

dōn

  1. to do

Conjugation

Descendants


Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

do + an

Alternative forms

Preposition

don

  1. to the (singular)
    Chaidh i don bhùth. - She went to the shop.
  2. for the (singular)

Usage notes

  • Without the definite article and in the plural the form do is used.
  • Lenites words beginning with b, c, f, g, m and p.

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -on

Etymology 1

From Late Latin dom (a courtesy title for monks and abbots), from domnus (master, sir), from Classical Latin dominus, from domus (a house), from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm (a house), from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

Noun

don m (plural dones, feminine doña)

  1. (obsolete) sir, master, lord
  2. A title of respect to a man, prefixed to Christian names
Related terms

Etymology 2

From Latin donum (a gift), from do (to give), from Proto-Indo-European *deh₃- (to give)

Noun

don m (plural dones)

  1. gift, present
  2. gift, talent, knack
See also

Swedish

Noun

don n

  1. a tool, a means

Declension

Inflection of don 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative don donet don donen
Genitive dons donets dons donens

Related terms


Turkish

Etymology 1

From Old Turkic ton, from Proto-Turkic *tōn.

Noun

don

  1. underpants

Etymology 2

From Old Turkic toŋ, from Proto-Turkic *tong, *doŋ.

Noun

don

  1. frost

Verb

don

  1. singular imperative of donmak
  2. singular negative imperative of donmamak

Antonyms


Zazaki

Noun

don ?

  1. kind of bread