Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Side

Side

(sīd)
,
Noun.
[AS.
sīde
; akin to D.
zijde
, G.
seite
, OHG.
sīta
, Icel.
sī[GREEK]a
, Dan.
side
, Sw.
sida
; cf. AS.
sīd
large, spacious, Icel.
sī[GREEK]r
long, hanging.]
1.
The margin, edge, verge, or border of a surface; especially (when the thing spoken of is somewhat oblong in shape), one of the longer edges as distinguished from the shorter edges, called ends; a bounding line of a geometrical figure;
as, the
side
of a field, of a square or triangle, of a river, of a road, etc.
3.
Any outer portion of a thing considered apart from, and yet in relation to, the rest;
as, the upper
side
of a sphere
; also, any part or position viewed as opposite to or contrasted with another;
as, this or that
side
.
Looking round on every
side
beheld
A pathless desert.
Milton.
4.
(a)
One of the halves of the body, of an animals or man, on either side of the mesial plane; or that which pertains to such a half;
as, a
side
of beef; a
side
of sole leather.
(b)
The right or left part of the wall or trunk of the body;
as, a pain in the
side
.
One of the soldiers with a spear pierced his
side
.
John xix. 34.
5.
A slope or declivity, as of a hill, considered as opposed to another slope over the ridge.
Along the
side
of yon small hill.
Milton.
6.
The position of a person or party regarded as opposed to another person or party, whether as a rival or a foe; a body of advocates or partisans; a party; hence, the interest or cause which one maintains against another; a doctrine or view opposed to another.
God on our
side
, doubt not of victory.
Shakespeare
We have not always been of the . . . same
side
in politics.
Landor.
Sets the passions on the
side
of truth.
Pope.
7.
A line of descent traced through one parent as distinguished from that traced through another.
To sit upon thy father David’s throne,
By mother's
side
thy father.
Milton.
8.
Fig.: Aspect or part regarded as contrasted with some other;
as, the bright
side
of poverty
.
By the side of
,
close at hand; near to.
Exterior side
.
(Fort.)
See
Exterior
, and Illust. of
Ravelin
.
Interior side
(Fort.)
,
the line drawn from the center of one bastion to that of the next, or the line curtain produced to the two oblique radii in front.
H. L. Scott.
Side by side
,
close together and abreast; in company or along with.
To choose sides
,
to select those who shall compete, as in a game, on either side.
To take sides
,
to attach one's self to, or give assistance to, one of two opposing sides or parties.

Side

,
Adj.
1.
Of or pertaining to a side, or the sides; being on the side, or toward the side; lateral.
One mighty squadron with a
side
wind sped.
Dryden.
2.
Hence, indirect; oblique; collateral; incidental;
as, a
side
issue; a
side
view or remark.
The law hath no
side
respect to their persons.
Hooker.
3.
[AS.
sīd
. Cf
Side
,
Noun.
]
Long; large; extensive.
[Obs. or Scot.]
Shak.
His gown had
side
sleeves down to mid leg.
Laneham.
Side action
,
in breech-loading firearms, a mechanism for operating the breech block, which is moved by a lever that turns sidewise.
Side arms
,
weapons worn at the side, as sword, bayonet, pistols, etc.
Side ax
,
an ax of which the handle is bent to one side.
Side-bar rule
(Eng. Law.)
,
a rule authorized by the courts to be granted by their officers as a matter of course, without formal application being made to them in open court; – so called because anciently moved for by the attorneys at side bar, that is, informally.
Burril.
Side box
,
a box or inclosed seat on the side of a theater.

To insure a
side-box
station at half price.
Cowper.
Side chain
,
(a)
one of two safety chains connecting a tender with a locomotive, at the sides.
(b)
(Chem.)
a chain of atoms attached to the main structure of a large molecule, especially of a polymer.
Side cut
,
a canal or road branching out from the main one.
[U.S.]
Side dish
,
one of the dishes subordinate to the main course.
Side glance
,
a glance or brief look to one side.
Side hook
(Carp.)
,
a notched piece of wood for clamping a board to something, as a bench.
Side lever
,
a working beam of a side-lever engine.
Side-lever engine
,
a marine steam engine having a working beam of each side of the cylinder, near the bottom of the engine, communicating motion to a crank that is above them.
Side pipe
(Steam Engine)
,
a steam or exhaust pipe connecting the upper and lower steam chests of the cylinder of a beam engine.
Side plane
,
a plane in which the cutting edge of the iron is at the side of the stock.
Side posts
(Carp.)
,
posts in a truss, usually placed in pairs, each post set at the same distance from the middle of the truss, for supporting the principal rafters, hanging the tiebeam, etc.
Side rod
.
(a)
One of the rods which connect the piston-rod crosshead with the side levers, in a side-lever engine.
(b)
See
Parallel rod
, under
Parallel
.
Side screw
(Firearms)
,
one of the screws by which the lock is secured to the side of a firearm stock.
Side table
,
a table placed either against the wall or aside from the principal table.
Side tool
(Mach.)
,
a cutting tool, used in a lathe or planer, having the cutting edge at the side instead of at the point.
Side wind
,
a wind from one side; hence, an indirect attack, or indirect means.
Wright.

Side

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Sided
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Siding
.]
1.
To lean on one side.
[Obs.]
Bacon.
2.
To embrace the opinions of one party, or engage in its interest, in opposition to another party; to take sides;
as, to
side
with the ministerial party
.
All
side
in parties, and begin the attack.
Pope.

Side

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To be or stand at the side of; to be on the side toward.
[Obs.]
His blind eye that
sided
Paridell.
Spenser.
2.
To suit; to pair; to match.
[Obs.]
Clarendon.
3.
(Shipbuilding)
To work (a timber or rib) to a certain thickness by trimming the sides.
4.
To furnish with a siding;
as, to
side
a house
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Side

SIDE

,
Noun.
[L. latus.]
1.
The broad and long part of surface of a thing, as distinguished from the end, which is of less extent and many be a point; as the side of a plank; the side of a chest; the side of a house or of a ship. One side of a lens may be concave, the other convex. Side is distinguished from edge; as the side of a knife or sword.
2.
Margin; edge; verge; border; the exterior line of any thing, considered in length; as the side of a tract of land or a field, as distinct from the end. Hence we say, the side of a river; the side of a road; the east and west side of the American continent.
3.
The part of an animal between the back and the face and belly; the part of which the ribs are situated; as the right side; the left side. This is quadrupeds is usually the broadest part.
4.
The part between the top and bottom; the slope, declivity or ascent, as of a hill or mountain; as the side of mount Etna.
5.
One part of a thing, or its superficies; as the side of a ball or sphere.
6.
Any part considered in respect to its direction or point of compass; as to whichever side we direct our view. We see difficulties on every side.
7.
Party; faction; sect; any man or body of men considered as in opposition to another. One man enlists on the side of the tories; another on the side of the whigs. Some persons change sides for the sake of popularity and office, and sink themselves in public estimation. And sets the passions on the side of truth.
8.
Interest; favor. The Lord is on my side. Ps. 118
9.
Any part being in opposition or contradistinction to another; In the battle, the slaughter was great on both sides. Passion invites on one side; reason restrains on the other. Open justice bends on neither side.
10.
Branch or a family; separate line of descent; as,by the father's side he is descended from a noble family; by the mother's side his birth is respectable.
11.
Quarter; region; part; as from one side of heaven to the other. To take sides, to embrace the opinions of attach one's self to the interest of a party when in opposition to another. To choose side, to select parties for competition in exercises of any kind.

SIDE

,
Adj.
1.
Lateral; as a side post; but perhaps it would be better to consider the word as compound.
2.
Being on the side, or toward the side; oblique; indirect. The law hath no side respect to their persons. One mighty squadron with a side wind sped. So we say, a side view, a side blow.
3.
Long; large; extensive.

SIDE

,
Verb.
I.
[Little used.]
1.
To lean on one side.
2.
To embrace the opinions of one party or engage in its interest, when opposed to another party; as, to side with the ministerial party. All side in parties and begin th' attack.

SIDE

,
Verb.
t.
1.
To stand at the side of. [Not in use.]
2.
To suit; to pair. [Not in use.]

Definition 2022


Side

Side

See also: side, sìde, and -side

English

Proper noun

Side

  1. (geography, historical) An ancient city on a small peninsula on the Mediterranean coast of Anatolia, settled by Greeks from Cyme.
  2. (geography) Its ruins, located beside the village of Selimiye in Turkey's Antalya province.

Derived terms

  • (demonym) Sidetan
  • (language) Sidetic

Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek Σίδη (Sídē).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈsi.deː/, [ˈsɪ.deː]

Proper noun

Sidē f (genitive Sidēs); first declension

  1. (geography) Side.

Declension

First declension, Greek type.

Case Singular
nominative Sidē
genitive Sidēs
dative Sidae
accusative Sidēn
ablative Sidē
vocative Sidē

Derived terms

  • (demonym) Sidētānus

Descendants

side

side

See also: Side, sìde, and -side

English

Noun

side (plural sides)

  1. A bounding straight edge of a two-dimensional shape.
    A square has four sides.
  2. A flat surface of a three-dimensional object; a face.
    A cube has six sides.
  3. One half (left or right, top or bottom, front or back, etc.) of something or someone.
    Which side of the tray shall I put it on? The patient was bleeding on the right side.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
      We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine. [] As we reached the lodge we heard the whistle, and we backed up against one side of the platform as the train pulled up at the other.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side, and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.
  4. A region in a specified position with respect to something.
    Meet me on the north side of the monument.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapterII:
      Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill.
  5. The portion of the human torso usually covered by the arms when they are not raised; the areas on the left and right between the belly or chest and the back.
    I generally sleep on my side.
    • 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured (Jones & Bartlett Learning, ISBN 9780763744069), p. 234:
      Roll the patient onto the left side so that head, shoulders, and torso move at the same time without twisting.
  6. One surface of a sheet of paper (used instead of "page", which can mean one or both surfaces.)
    John wrote 15 sides for his essay!
  7. One possible aspect of a concept, person or thing.
    Look on the bright side.
  8. One set of competitors in a game.
    Which side has kick-off?
  9. (Britain, Australia, Ireland) A sports team.
    • 1988, Ken Jones, Soccer skills & tactics, page 9:
      Newly promoted, they were top of the First Division and unbeaten when they took on a Manchester United side that had been revitalized by a new manager, [].
    • 2011 September 28, Jon Smith, Valencia 1-1 Chelsea”, in BBC Sport:
      It was no less than Valencia deserved after dominating possession in the final 20 minutes although Chelsea defended resolutely and restricted the Spanish side to shooting from long range.
    • 2011, Nick Cain, Greg Growden, Rugby Union For Dummies, UK Edition, 3rd Edition, p.220:
      Initially, the English, Welsh, Scots and Irish unions refused to send national sides, preferring instead to send touring sides like the Barbarians, the Penguins, the Co-Optimists, the Wolfhounds, Crawshays Welsh, and the Public School Wanderers.
  10. A group having a particular allegiance in a conflict or competition.
    In the second world war, the Italians were on the side of the Germans.
    • Landor
      We have not always been of the [] same side in politics.
    • Alexander Pope
      sets the passions on the side of truth
  11. (sports, billiards, snooker, pool) Sidespin; english
    He had to put a bit of side on to hit the pink ball.
  12. (Britain, Australia, Ireland, dated) A television channel, usually as opposed to the one currently being watched (from when there were only two channels).
    I just want to see what's on the other side James said there was a good film on tonight.
  13. (US, colloquial) A dish that accompanies the main course; a side dish.
    Do you want a side of cole-slaw with that?
  14. A line of descent traced through one parent as distinguished from that traced through another.
    • Milton
      To sit upon thy father David's throne, / By mother's side thy father.
  15. (baseball) The batters faced in an inning by a particular pitcher
    • Clayton Kershaw struck out the side in the 6th inning.
Synonyms
  • (bounding straight edge of an object): edge
  • (flat surface of an object): face
  • (left or right half): half
  • (surface of a sheet of paper): page
  • (region in a specified position with respect to something):
  • (one possible aspect of a concept):
  • (set of opponents in a game): team
  • (group having a particular allegiance in a war):
  • (television channel): channel, station (US)
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • English words suffixed with -side
Related terms
Translations

Verb

side (third-person singular simple present sides, present participle siding, simple past and past participle sided)

  1. (intransitive) To ally oneself, be in an alliance, usually with "with" or rarely "in with"
    Which will you side with, good or evil?
    • 1597, Francis Bacon, Essays – "Of Great Place":
      All rising to great place is by a winding star; and if there be factions, it is good to side a man's self, whilst he is in the rising, and to balance himself when he is placed.
    • Alexander Pope
      All side in parties, and begin the attack.
    • 1958, Archer Fullingim, The Kountze [Texas] News, August 28, 1958:
      How does it feel... to... side in with those who voted against you in 1947?
  2. To lean on one side.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To be or stand at the side of; to be on the side toward.
    • Spenser
      His blind eye that sided Paridell.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To suit; to pair; to match.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Clarendon to this entry?)
  5. (transitive, shipbuilding) To work (a timber or rib) to a certain thickness by trimming the sides.
  6. (transitive) To furnish with a siding.
    to side a house
Synonyms
  • (ally oneself):
  • take side
Derived terms
Translations
See also

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: full · country · course · #221: side · small · cannot · father

Etymology 2

From Middle English side, syde, syd, from Old English sīd (wide, broad, spacious, ample, extensive, vast, far-reaching), from Proto-Germanic *sīdaz (drooping, hanging, low, excessive, extra), from Proto-Indo-European *sēy- (to send, throw, drop, sow, deposit). Cognate with Low German sied (low), Swedish sid (long, hanging down), Icelandic síður (low hanging, long).

Adjective

side (comparative more side, superlative most side)

  1. Being on the left or right, or toward the left or right; lateral.
    • Dryden
      One mighty squadron with a side wind sped.
  2. Indirect; oblique; incidental.
    a side issue; a side view or remark
    • Hooker
      The law hath no side respect to their persons.
  3. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Wide; large; long, pendulous, hanging low, trailing; far-reaching.
    • Laneham
      His gown had side sleeves down to mid leg.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  4. (Scotland) Far; distant.
Derived terms

Etymology 3

From Middle English side, syde, from Old English sīde (widely, extensively, amply). See above.

Adverb

side (comparative more side, superlative most side)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Widely; wide; far.

Anagrams


Estonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *sidek. Equivalent to siduma + -e.

Noun

side (genitive sideme, partitive sidet)

  1. bond, binding
  2. bandage

Inflection

Compounds

Noun

side (genitive side, partitive sidet)

  1. communications
  2. post office

Inflection

Compounds

  • otseside

Finnish

(index si)

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *sidek. Equivalent to sitoa + -e.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsideˣ/
  • Hyphenation: si‧de

Noun

side

  1. bandage
  2. bond
  3. sanitary towel
  4. (anatomy) ligament

Declension

Inflection of side (Kotus type 48/hame, t-d gradation)
nominative side siteet
genitive siteen siteiden
siteitten
partitive sidettä siteitä
illative siteeseen siteisiin
siteihin
singular plural
nominative side siteet
accusative nom. side siteet
gen. siteen
genitive siteen siteiden
siteitten
partitive sidettä siteitä
inessive siteessä siteissä
elative siteestä siteistä
illative siteeseen siteisiin
siteihin
adessive siteellä siteillä
ablative siteeltä siteiltä
allative siteelle siteille
essive siteenä siteinä
translative siteeksi siteiksi
instructive sitein
abessive siteettä siteittä
comitative siteineen

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Anagrams


Latin

Verb

sīde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of sīdō

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish saiget, from Latin sagitta.

Noun

side f (genitive singular sidey, plural sideyn)

  1. arrow, bolt, shaft

Related terms

  • fleit
  • sideyr (archer)

Mutation

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
side hide
after "yn", tide
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish síd.

Noun

side m

  1. a fairy hill or mound
  2. (in plural) = áes side (people of the fairy mounds, supernatural beings, fairies)

Descendants

Mutation

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
side ṡide unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

  • 1 síd, síth” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse síða.

Noun

side f, m (definite singular sida or siden, indefinite plural sider, definite plural sidene)

  1. a page (e.g. in a book)
  2. side
    på høyre side - on the right-hand side
  3. (of a case) aspect
  4. (on animal) flank

Derived terms


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse síða.

Noun

side f (definite singular sida, indefinite plural sider, definite plural sidene)

  1. a page (e.g. in a book)
    ei bok på 300 sider - a book of 300 pages
  2. side

Derived terms


Old English

Etymology 1

From the adjective sīd

Adverb

sīde

  1. widely

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *sīdǭ, whence also Old High German sīta

Noun

sīde f

  1. side