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Webster 1913 Edition


Distant

Dis′tant

,
Adj.
[F., fr. L.
distans
,
-antis
, p. pr. of
distare
to stand apart, be separate or distant;
dis-
+
stare
to stand. See
Stand
.]
1.
Separated; having an intervening space; at a distance; away.
One board had two tenons, equally
distant
.
Ex. xxxvi. 22.
Diana’s temple is not
distant
far.
Shakespeare
2.
Far separated; far off; not near; remote; – in place, time, consanguinity, or connection;
as,
distant
times;
distant
relatives.
The success of these
distant
enterprises.
Prescott.
3.
Reserved or repelling in manners; cold; not cordial; somewhat haughty;
as, a
distant
manner
.
He passed me with a
distant
bow.
Goldsmith.
4.
Indistinct; faint; obscure, as from distance.
Some
distant
knowledge.
Shakespeare
A
distant
glimpse.
W. Irving.
Syn. – Separate; far; remote; aloof; apart; asunder; slight; faint; indirect; indistinct.

Webster 1828 Edition


Distant

DISTANT

,
Adj.
[L., standing apart.]
1.
Separate; having an intervening space of any indefinite extent. One point may be less than a line or a hairs breadth distant from another. Saturn is supposed to be nearly nine hundred million miles distant from the sun.
2.
Remote in place; as, a distant object appears under a small angle.
3.
Remote in time, past or future; as a distant age or period of the world.
4.
Remote in the line of succession or descent, indefinitely; as a distant descendant; a distant ancestor; distant posterity.
5.
Remote in natural connection or consanguinity; as a distant relation; distant kindred; a distant collateral line.
6.
Remote in nature; not allied; not agreeing with or in conformity to; as practice very distant from principles or profession.
7.
Remote in view; slight; faint; not very likely to be realized; as, we have a distant hope or prospect of seeing better times.
8.
Remote in connection; slight; faint; indirect; not easily seen or understood; as a distant hint or allusion to a person or subject. So also we say, a distant idea; a distant thought; a distant resemblance.
9.
Reserved; shy; implying haughtiness, coldness of affection, indifference, or disrespect; as, the manners of a person are distant.

Definition 2022


distant

distant

English

Alternative forms

Adjective

distant (comparative more distant, superlative most distant)

  1. Far off (physically, logically or mentally).
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, in The Celebrity:
      Judge Short had gone to town, and Farrar was off for a three days' cruise up the lake. I was bitterly regretting I had not gone with him when the distant notes of a coach horn reached my ear, and I descried a four-in-hand winding its way up the inn road from the direction of Mohair.
    We heard a distant rumbling but didn't pay any more attention to it.   She was surprised to find that her fiancé was a distant relative of hers.   His distant look showed that he was not listening to me.
  2. Emotionally unresponsive or unwilling to express genuine feelings.
    Ever since the trauma she has been totally distant to me.

Derived terms

  • most-distant

Related terms

Translations


Catalan

Adjective

distant m, f (masculine and feminine plural distants)

  1. distant

Related terms


French

Adjective

distant m (feminine singular distante, masculine plural distants, feminine plural distantes)

  1. distant
  2. aloof

Latin

Verb

distant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of distō

Romansch

Etymology

From Latin distāns, present participle of distō, distāre (stand apart, be distant).

Adjective

distant m (feminine singular distanta, masculine plural distants, feminine plural distantas)

  1. (Puter) distant, remote, faraway

Synonyms