Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Hide

Hide

(hīd)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp.
Hid
(hĭd)
;
p. p.
Hidden
(hĭd′d’n)
,
Hid
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Hiding
(hīd′ĭng)
.]
[OE.
hiden
,
huden
, AS.
hȳdan
; akin to Gr.
κεύθειν
, and prob. to E.
house
,
hut
, and perh. to E.
hide
of an animal, and to
hoard
. Cf.
Hoard
.]
1.
To conceal, or withdraw from sight; to put out of view; to secrete.
A city that is set on an hill can not be
hid
.
Matt. v. 15.
If circumstances lead me, I will find
Where truth is
hid
.
Shakespeare
2.
To withhold from knowledge; to keep secret; to refrain from avowing or confessing.
Heaven from all creatures
hides
the book of fate.
Pope.
3.
To remove from danger; to shelter.
In the time of trouble he shall
hide
me in his pavilion.
Ps. xxvi. 5.
Syn. – To conceal; secrete; disguise; dissemble; screen; cloak; mask; veil. See
Conceal
.

Hide

,
Verb.
I.
To lie concealed; to keep one’s self out of view; to be withdrawn from sight or observation.
Bred to disguise, in public 'tis you
hide
.
Pope.
Hide and seek
,
a play of children, in which some hide themselves, and others seek them.
Swift.

Hide

,
Noun.
[AS.
hīd
, earlier
hīged
; prob. orig., land enough to support a family; cf. AS.
hīwan
,
hīgan
, members of a household, and E.
hind
a peasant.]
(O. Eng. Law.)
(a)
An abode or dwelling.
(b)
A measure of land, common in Domesday Book and old English charters, the quantity of which is not well ascertained, but has been differently estimated at 80, 100, and 120 acres.
[Written also
hyde
.]

Hide

,
Noun.
[OE.
hide
,
hude
, AS.
hȳd
; akin to D.
huid
, OHG.
hūt
, G.
haut
, Icel.
hūð
, Dan. & Sw.
hud
, L.
cutis
, Gr.
κύτος
; and cf. Gr.
σκύτοσ
skin, hide, L.
scutum
shield, and E.
sky
. √13.]
1.
The skin of an animal, either raw or dressed; – generally applied to the undressed skins of the larger domestic animals, as oxen, horses, etc.
2.
The human skin; – so called in contempt.
O tiger's heart, wrapped in a woman's
hide
!
Shakespeare

Hide

(hīd)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Hided
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Hiding
.]
To flog; to whip.
[Prov. Eng. & Low, U. S.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Hide

HIDE

,
Verb.
T.
pret. hid; pp. hid, hidden.
1.
To conceal; to withhold or withdraw from sight; to place in any state or position in which the view is intercepted from the object. The intervention of the moon between the earth and the sun hides the latter from our sight. The people in Turkey hide their grain in the earth. No human being can hide his crimes or his neglect of duty from his Maker.
2.
To conceal from knowledge; to keep secret.
Depart to the mountains; hide yourselves there three days. Josh.2.
Tell me now what thou hast done--hide it not from me. Josh.7.
3.
In Scripture, not to confess or disclose; or to excuse and extenuate.
I acknowledged my sin to thee, and my iniquity have I not hid. Ps.32.
4.
To protect; to keep in safety.
In the time of trouble, he shall hide me in his pavilion. Ps.27.
To hide the face from, to overlook; to pardon.
Hide thy face from my sins. Ps.51.
To hide the face, to withdraw spiritual presence, support and consolation.
Thou didst hide thy face,and I was troubled. Ps.30.
To hide one's self, to put one's self in a condition to be safe; to secure protection.
The prudent man foreseeth the evil and hideth himself. Prov.22.

HIDE

,
Verb.
I.
To lie concealed; to keep one's self out of view; to be withdrawn from sight.
Bred to disguise, in public 'tis you hide.
Hide and seek, a play of boys, in which some hide themselves and another seeks them.

HIDE

,
Noun.
In the ancient laws of England, a certain portion of land, the quantity of which however is not well ascertained. Some authors consider it as the quantity that could be tilled with one plow; others, as much as would maintain a family. Some suppose it to be 60, some 80,and others 100 acres.

HIDE

,
Noun.
[L. cutis; Gr. either a peel, from stripping, separating, or a cover.]
1.
The skin of an animal, either raw or dressed; more generally applied to the undressed skins of the larger domestic animals, as oxen, horses, &c.
2.
The human skin; in contempt.

Definition 2022


hide

hide

See also: hídé

English

Verb

hide (third-person singular simple present hides, present participle hiding, simple past hid, past participle hidden or (archaic) hid)

  1. (transitive) To put (something) in a place where it will be harder to discover or out of sight.
    • 1856, Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part III Chapter XI, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
      The blind man, whom he had not been able to cure with the pomade, had gone back to the hill of Bois-Guillaume, where he told the travellers of the vain attempt of the druggist, to such an extent, that Homais when he went to town hid himself behind the curtains of the "Hirondelle" to avoid meeting him.
    • 2013 July 19, Timothy Garton Ash, Where Dr Pangloss meets Machiavelli”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 18:
      Hidden behind thickets of acronyms and gorse bushes of detail, a new great game is under way across the globe. Some call it geoeconomics, but it's geopolitics too. The current power play consists of an extraordinary range of countries simultaneously sitting down to negotiate big free trade and investment agreements.
    He hides his magazines under the bed.
    The politicians were accused of keeping information hidden from the public.
  2. (intransitive) To put oneself in a place where one will be harder to find or out of sight.
    • 2013 May-June, William E. Conner, An Acoustic Arms Race”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 206-7:
      Nonetheless, some insect prey take advantage of clutter by hiding in it. Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close (less than half a meter) above vegetation and effectively blending into the clutter of echoes that the bat receives from the leaves and stems around them.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English hȳd, from Proto-Germanic *hūdiz (compare West Frisian hûd, Dutch huid, German Haut), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keu-t- 'skin, hide' (compare Welsh cwd (scrotum), Latin cutis (skin), Lithuanian kutys (purse, money-belt), Ancient Greek κύτος (kútos, hollow vessel), σκῦτος (skûtos, cover, hide)), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keu-, 'to cover'. More at sky.

Noun

hide (plural hides)

  1. (countable) The skin of an animal.
  2. (obsolete or derogatory) The human skin.
    • Shakespeare
      O tiger's heart, wrapped in a woman's hide!
  3. (uncountable, informal, usually US) One's own life or personal safety, especially when in peril.
    • 1957, Ayn Rand, Francisco d'Anconia's speech in Atlas Shrugged:
      The rotter who simpers that he sees no difference between the power of money and the power of the whip, ought to learn the difference on his own hide—as I think he will.
  4. (countable) (mainly British) A covered structure from which hunters, birdwatchers, etc can observe animals without scaring them.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

hide (third-person singular simple present hides, present participle hiding, simple past and past participle hided)

  1. To beat with a whip made from hide.
    • 1891, Robert Weir, J. Moray Brown, Riding
      He ran last week, and he was hided, and he was out on the day before yesterday, and here he is once more, and he knows he's got to run and to be hided again.

Etymology 3

From Middle English hide, from Old English hīd, hȳd, hīġed, hīġid (a measure of land), for earlier *hīwid (the amount of land needed to support one family), a derivative of Proto-Germanic *hīwaz, *hīwō (relative, fellow-lodger, family), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱei- (to lie with, store, be familiar). Related to Old English hīwisc (hide of land, household), Old English hīwan (members of a family, household). More at hewe, hind.

Noun

hide (plural hides)

  1. (historical) An English unit of land and tax assessment intended to support one household and notionally equal to 120 acres.
Usage notes

The hide was originally intended to represent the amount of land farmed by a single household but was primarily connected to obligations owed to the Saxon and Norman kings and thus varied greatly from place to place. Around the time of the Domesday Book under the Normans, the hide was usually but not always the land expected to produce £1 (1 Tower pound of sterling silver) in income over the year.

Hypernyms
Synonyms
Hyponyms

Anagrams