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Webster 1913 Edition


Outside

Out′sideˊ

,
Noun.
1.
The external part of a thing; the part, end, or side which forms the external surface; that which appears, or is manifest; that which is superficial; the exterior.
There may be great need of an
outside
where there is little or nothing within.
South.
Created beings see nothing but our
outside
.
Addison.
I threw open the door of my chamber, and found the family standing on the
outside
.
Spectator.
3.
The furthest limit, as to number, quantity, extent, etc.; the utmost;
as, it may last a week at the
outside
.
4.
One who, or that which, is without; hence, an outside passenger, as distinguished from one who is inside. See
Inside
,
Noun.
3.
[Colloq. Eng.]

Out′sideˊ

,
Adj.
1.
Of or pertaining to the outside; external; exterior; superficial.
2.
Reaching the extreme or farthest limit, as to extent, quantity, etc.;
as, an
outside
estimate
.
[Colloq.]
Outside finish
(Arch.)
,
a term for the minor parts, as corner boards, hanging stiles, etc., required to complete the exterior of a wooden building; – rare in masonry.

Out′sideˊ

,
adv.
or
p
rep.
On or to the outside (of); without; on the exterior;
as, to ride
outside
the coach; he stayed
outside
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Outside

OUTSI'DE

, n.
1.
The external part of a thing; the part, end or side which forms the surface or superficies.
2.
Superficial appearance; exterior; as the outside of a man or of manners.
Created beings see nothing but our outside.
3.
Person; external man.
4.
The part or place that lies without or beyond an inclosure.
I threw open the door of my chamber and found the family standing on the outside.
5.
The utmost.

Definition 2022


Outside

Outside

See also: outside

English

Proper noun

Outside (uncountable)

  1. (slang, US) To residents of Alaska, the rest of the United States, especially the contiguous 48 states south of Canada.
    She's going to the Outside for Christmas.

Synonyms

Anagrams

outside

outside

See also: Outside

English

Alternative forms

  • owtside (obsolete)

Noun

outside (plural outsides)

  1. The part of something that faces out; the outer surface.
    • 1653, Thomas Urquhart (translator), François Rabelais, Gargantua, "The Author's Prologue to the First Book"
      Silenes of old were little boxes, like those we now may see in the shops of apothecaries, painted on the outside with wanton toyish figures, as harpies, satyrs, bridled geese, horned hares, saddled ducks, flying goats, thiller harts, and other such-like counterfeited pictures at discretion, ...
    • 1890, Jacob Riis, How the Other Half Lives,
      The outside of the building gives no valuable clew.
    • 1911, Cab, article in Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition,
      The number of persons which the cab is licensed to carry must be painted at the back on the outside.
  2. The external appearance of something.
  3. The space beyond some limit or boundary.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Spectator
      I threw open the door of my chamber, and found the family standing on the outside.
    • 1967, The Bee Gees, New York Mining Disaster 1941,
      Have you seen my wife, Mr Jones? / Do you know what it's like on the outside?
    • 1982, Anne Dudley, Trevor Horn, Malcolm Mclaren, Buffalo Gals
      Four buffalo gals go 'round the outside / 'Round the outside / 'Round the outside / Four buffalo gals go 'round the outside / And do-si-do your partners.
  4. The furthest limit, as to number, quantity, extent, etc.
    It may last a week at the outside.
  5. (dated, Britain, colloquial) A passenger riding on the outside of a coach or carriage.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
      The outsides did as outsides always do. They were very cheerful and talkative at the beginning of every stage, and very dismal and sleepy in the middle []

Usage notes

  • Rarely used with an.

Translations

Adjective

outside (comparative more outside, superlative most outside)

  1. Of or pertaining to the outer surface, limit or boundary.
    The outside surface looks good.
    • 1901, Miles Franklin, My Brilliant Career,
      Household drudgery, woodcutting, milking, and gardening soon roughen the hands and dim the outside polish.
    • 1921, Ernest Leopold Ahrons, Steam Locomotive Construction and Maintenance,
      The tyres, which come from the steel manufacturers, are rolled without weld. They are bored inside to an internal diameter slightly less than the outside diameter of the wheel centre, on to which they have to be shrunk, the allowance being about 1/1000 of the diameter of the wheel centre.
  2. Of, pertaining to or originating from beyond the outer surface, limit or boundary.
  3. (baseball, of a pitch) Away (far) from the batter as it crosses home plate.
    The first pitch is ... just a bit outside.
  4. Reaching the extreme or farthest limit, as to extent, quantity, etc.
    an outside estimate

Translations

Adverb

outside (comparative more outside, superlative most outside)

  1. Outdoors.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 14, in The China Governess:
      Just under the ceiling there were three lunette windows, heavily barred and blacked out in the normal way by centuries of grime. Their bases were on a level with the pavement outside, a narrow way which was several feet lower than the road behind the house.
    I slept outside last night.

Translations

Preposition

outside

  1. On the outside of, not inside (something, such as a building).
    • 1919 June 28, the Allied and Associated Powers and Germany, Treaty of Versailles, Part IV—German Rights and Interests outside Germany,
      In territory outside her European frontiers as fixed by the present Treaty, Germany renounces all rights, titles and privileges whatever in or over territory which belonged to her or to her allies, and all rights, titles and privileges whatever their origin which she held as against the Allied and Associated Powers.
    • 1906, Upton Sinclair, The Jungle, Chapter 28
      Jurgis waited outside and walked home with Marija.
    • 1982, 97th Congress of the United States, Intelligence Identities Protection Act of 1982,
      There is jurisdiction over an offense under section 601 committed outside the United States if the individual committing the offense is a citizen of the United States or an alien lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence (as defined in section 101(a)(20) of the Immigration and Nationality Act).
    • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page vii
      Hepaticology, outside the temperate parts of the Northern Hemisphere, still lies deep in the shadow cast by that ultimate "closet taxonomist," Franz Stephani—a ghost whose shadow falls over us all.
  2. Near, but not in.
    • 1898, H. G. Wells, The War of the Worlds,
      Up the hill Richmond town was burning briskly; outside the town of Richmond there was no trace of the Black Smoke.
    • 2002, Jane Green, Bookends, 2003 trade paperback edition, ISBN 0767907817, outside back cover:
      Jane Green [] lives outside New York City with her husband and children.
    • 2010 December, Patricia Corrigan, "Beyond Congregations", OY! (magazine section), St. Louis Jewish Light, volume 63, number 50, page 24:
      Kastner lives in University City with his wife, Leslie Cohen, who works for the Jewish Federation, and their 17-month-old old[sic] son. Kastner grew up outside Cleveland.
  3. (usually with “of”) Except, apart from.
    Outside of winning the lottery, the only way to succeed is through many years of hard work.

Translations

Antonyms

Derived terms

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: ship · third · evil · #693: outside · beside · worth · please

Anagrams