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Webster 1913 Edition


Lean

Lean

(lēn)
,
Verb.
T.
[Icel.
leyna
; akin to G.
läugnen
to deny, AS.
lȳgnian
, also E.
lie
to speak falsely.]
To conceal.
[Obs.]
Ray.

Lean

(lēn)
,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Leaned
(lēnd)
, sometimes
Leant
(lĕnt);
p. pr. & vb. n.
Leaning
.]
[OE.
lenen
, AS.
hlinian
,
hleonian
,
Verb.
I.
; akin to OS.
hlinōn
, D.
leunen
, OHG.
hlinēn
,
linēn
, G.
lehnen
, L.
inclinare
, Gr.
κλίνειν
, L.
clivus
hill, slope. √40. Cf.
Declivity
,
Climax
,
Incline
,
Ladder
.]
1.
To incline, deviate, or bend, from a vertical position; to be in a position thus inclining or deviating;
as, she
leaned
out at the window; a
leaning
column.
“He leant forward.”
Dickens.
2.
To incline in opinion or desire; to conform in conduct; – with
to
,
toward
, etc.
They delight rather to
lean
to their old customs.
Spenser.
3.
To rest or rely, for support, comfort, and the like; – with
on
,
upon
, or
against
.
He
leaned
not on his fathers but himself.
Tennyson.

Lean

,
Verb.
T.
[From
Lean
,
Verb.
I.
; AS.
hlǣnan
, v. t., fr.
hleonian
,
hlinian
,
Verb.
I.
]
To cause to lean; to incline; to support or rest.
Mrs. Browning.
His fainting limbs against an oak he
leant
.
Dryden.

Lean

(lēn)
,
Adj.
[
Com
par.
Leaner
(lēn′ẽr)
;
sup
erl.
Leanest
.]
[OE.
lene
, AS.
hlǣne
; prob. akin to E.
lean
to incline. See
Lean
,
Verb.
I.
]
1.
Wanting flesh; destitute of or deficient in fat; slim; not plump; slender; meager; thin; lank;
as, a
lean
body; a
lean
cattle.
2.
Wanting fullness, richness, sufficiency, or productiveness; deficient in quality or contents; slender; scant; barren; bare; mean; – used literally and figuratively;
as, the
lean
harvest; a
lean
purse; a
lean
discourse;
lean
wages.
“No lean wardrobe.”
Shak.
Their
lean
and flashy songs.
Milton.
What the land is, whether it be fat or
lean
.
Num. xiii. 20.
Out of my
lean
and low ability
I’ll lend you something.
Shakespeare
3.
(Typog.)
Of a character which prevents the compositor from earning the usual wages; – opposed to
fat
;
as,
lean
copy, matter, or type
.
Syn. – slender; spare; thin; meager; lank; skinny; gaunt.

Lean

,
Noun.
1.
That part of flesh which consists principally of muscle without the fat.
The fat was so white and the
lean
was so ruddy.
Goldsmith.
2.
(Typog.)
Unremunerative copy or work.

Webster 1828 Edition


Lean

LEAN

,
Verb.
I.
[Gr., L. clino.]
1.
To deviate or move from a straight or perpendicular line; or to be in a position thus deviating. We say, a column leans to the north or to the east; it leans to the right or left.
2.
To incline or propend; to tend toward.
They delight rather to lean to their old customs -
3.
To bend or incline so as to rest on something; as, to lean against a wall or a pillar; to lean on the arm of another.
4.
To bend; to be in a bending posture.

LEAN

, v.t.
1.
To incline; to cause to lean.
2.
To conceal. [Not in use.]

LEAN

,
Adj.
[L. lenis, and Eng. slender.]
1.
Wanting flesh; meager; not fat; as a lean body; a lean man or animal.
2.
Not rich; destitute of good qualities; bare; barren; as lean earth.
3.
Low; poor; in opposition to rich or great; as a lean action. [Unusual.]
4.
Barren of thought; destitute of that which improves or entertains; jejune; as a lean discourse or dissertation.

LEAN

,
Noun.
That part of flesh which consists of muscle without the fat.

Definition 2022


lean

lean

See also: Léan

English

Verb

lean (third-person singular simple present leans, present participle leaning, simple past and past participle leaned or (UK) leant)

  1. To incline, deviate, or bend, from a vertical position; to be in a position thus inclining or deviating.
    a leaning column
    She leaned out of the window.
  2. To incline in opinion or desire; to conform in conduct; with to, toward, etc.
    I'm leaning towards voting Conservative in the next election.
    • Edmund Spenser (c.1552–1599)
      They delight rather to lean to their old customs.
  3. To rest or rely, for support, comfort, etc.; with on, upon, or against.
    • Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892)
      He leaned not on his fathers but himself.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side, and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.
  4. To hang outwards.
  5. To press against.
    • John Dryden (1631-1700)
      His fainting limbs against an oak he leant.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

lean (plural leans)

  1. (of an object taller than its width and depth) An inclination away from the vertical.
    The trees had various leans toward gaps in the canopy.
Synonyms
  • (inclination away from vertical): tilt

Etymology 2

From Middle English lene (lean), from Old English hlǣne (lean), (cognate with Low German leen), perhaps from Old English hlǣnan (to cause to lean", in the sense of "to cause to bend or lean due to hunger or lack of food), from Proto-Germanic *hlainijaną (to cause to lean). If so, then related to Old English hlinian, hleonian (to lean).

Adjective

lean (comparative leaner, superlative leanest)

  1. (of a person or animal) slim; not fleshy.
  2. (of meat) having little fat.
  3. Having little extra or little to spare; scanty; meagre.
    a lean budget; a lean harvest
  4. Having a low proportion or concentration of a desired substance or ingredient.
    A lean ore hardly worth mining.
    Running on too lean a fuel-air mixture will cause, among other problems, your internal combustion engine to heat up too much.
  5. (printing, archaic) Of a character which prevents the compositor from earning the usual wages; opposed to fat.
    lean copy, matter, or type
Synonyms
  • See also Wikisaurus:scrawny
  • (Having a low proportion of a desired substance): deficient, dilute, poor
Antonyms
  • (Having a low proportion of a desired substance): rich
Translations

Verb

lean (third-person singular simple present leans, present participle leaning, simple past and past participle leaned)

  1. To thin out (a fuel-air mixture): to reduce the fuel flow into the mixture so that there is more air or oxygen.
    • 1938 July, Blaine and Dupont Miller, “Weather Hop”, in Boy's Life, Boy Scouts of America, ISSN 0006-8608, page 25:
      He leaned the mixture in an effort to cause a backfire through the carburetor, the generally accepted method of breaking the ice loose.
    • 2002 July, Tom Benenson, “Can Your Engine Run Too Lean?”, in Flying, volume 129, number 7, ISSN 0015-4806, page 73:
      Even the Pilot's Operating Handbooks (POH) for our training airplanes add to our paranoia with their insistence that we not lean the mixture until we're above 5000 feet density altitude.

Etymology 3

From Icelandic leyna? Akin to German [Term?] (deny). Compare lie (speak falsely).

Verb

lean (third-person singular simple present leans, present participle leaning, simple past and past participle leaned)

  1. To conceal.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ray to this entry?)

See also

References

  • lean in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • lean in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Anagrams


Galician

Verb

lean

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive of ler

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish lenaid (stays, sticks (to), follows), from Proto-Celtic *linā- (stick), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ley- (slimy); compare Latin linō (anoint), līmus (mud, slime), Sanskrit लिनाति (lināti, sticks, stays).

Pronunciation

Verb

lean (present analytic leanann, future analytic leanfaidh, verbal noun leanúint, past participle leanta)

  1. to follow

Conjugation

  • Alternative verbal noun: leanacht (Cois Fharraige)

Derived terms


Northern Sami

Verb

lean

  1. inflection of leat:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. past indicative connegative

Old English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *launą, from a suffixed form of Proto-Indo-European *leh₂u- (catch, plunder, profit). Cognate with Old Frisian lān, Old Saxon lōn, Dutch loon, Old High German lōn (German Lohn), Old Norse laun (Swedish lön), Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌿𐌽 (láun). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek λεία (leía) (from *λαϝία), Latin lucrum, Old Church Slavonic ловъ (lovŭ) (Russian лов (lov)), Old Irish lóg, Lithuanian lãvinti.

Noun

lēan n

  1. reward
Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Related terms
  • lēanian

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *lahaną. Cognate with Old Saxon lahan, Old High German lahan, Old Norse , Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌹𐌰𐌽 (laian).

Verb

lēan

  1. (transitive) to blame, find fault with, reproach
Conjugation

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

(third-person singular preterite lōg, third-person plural preterite lōgon)


Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish lenaid (stays, sticks (to), follows), from Proto-Celtic *linā- (stick), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lei- (slimy); compare Latin linō (anoint), Sanskrit लिनाति (lināti, sticks, stays).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʎɛn]

Verb

lean (past lean, future leanaidh, verbal noun leantainn or leanmhainn, past participle leanta)

  1. follow
  2. continue, proceed
    An lean an droch aimsir? ― Will the bad weather continue?

Derived terms


Spanish

Verb

lean

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) imperative form of leer.
  2. Second-person plural (ustedes) present subjunctive form of leer.
  3. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present subjunctive form of leer.

West Frisian

Noun

lean n

  1. wage, wages, salary
  2. reward

Example

  • "Frank Lloyd Wright hat de baan krigen en syn earste lean wie 25 dollar yn 'e wike." (For his first salary, Frank Lloyd Wright received 25 dollars per week.)