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Webster 1913 Edition


Aside

A-side′

,
adv.
[Pref.
a-
+
side
.]
1.
On, or to, one side; out of a straight line, course, or direction; at a little distance from the rest; out of the way; apart.
Thou shalt set
aside
that which is full.
2 Kings iv. 4.
But soft! but soft!
aside
: here comes the king.
Shakespeare
The flames were blown
aside
.
Dryden.
2.
Out of one’s thoughts; off; away;
as, to put
aside
gloomy thoughts
.
“Lay aside every weight.”
Heb. xii. 1.
3.
So as to be heard by others; privately.
Then lords and ladies spake
aside
.
Sir W. Scott.
To set aside
(Law)
,
to annul or defeat the effect or operation of, by a subsequent decision of the same or of a superior tribunal; to declare of no authority;
as, to
set aside
a verdict or a judgment
.

A-side′

,
Noun.
Something spoken aside; as, a remark made by a stageplayer which the other players are not supposed to hear.

Webster 1828 Edition


Aside

ASI'DE

,
ad.
[a and side. See Side.]
1.
On or to one side; out of a perpendicular or straight direction.
2.
At a little distance from the main part or body.
Thou shalt set aside that which is full. 2Kings 4.
3.
From the body; as, to put or lay aside a garment.
John 13.
4.
From the company; at a small distance or in private; as when speakers utter something by themselves, upon the stage.
5.
Separate from the person, mind or attention; in a state of abandonment.
Let us lay aside every weight. Heb. 12.
6.
Out of the line of rectitude or propriety, in a moral view.
They are all gone aside. Ps. 14.
7.
In a state of separation to a particular use; as, to set aside a thing for a future day.
To set aside, in judicial proceedings, is to defeat the effect or operation of, by a subsequent decision of a superior tribunal; as, to set aside a verdict or a judgment.

Definition 2021


aside

aside

See also: A-side

English

Adverb

aside (not comparable)

  1. To or on one side so as to be out of the way.
    Move aside, please, so that these people can come through.
    • Bible, 2 Kings iv. 4
      Thou shalt set aside that which is full.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      But soft! but soft! aside: here comes the king.
    • John Dryden (1631-1700)
      The flames were blown aside.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity:
      Here was my chance. I took the old man aside, and two or three glasses of Old Crow launched him into reminiscence.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, An Autobiography, Part I, chapter4:
      An indulgent playmate, Grannie would lay aside the long scratchy-looking letter she was writing (heavily crossed ‘to save notepaper’) and enter into the delightful pastime of ‘a chicken from Mr Whiteley's’.

Derived terms

Translations

Postposition

aside

  1. aside from
    Joking aside.
    Unusual circumstances aside.
    • 2012 June 26, Genevieve Koski, “Music: Reviews: Justin Bieber: Believe”, in The Onion AV Club:
      But musical ancestry aside, the influence to which Bieber is most beholden is the current trends in pop music, which means Believe is loaded up with EDM accouterments, seeking a comfortable middle ground where Bieber’s impressively refined pop-R&B croon can rub up on techno blasts and garish dubstep drops (and occasionally grind on some AutoTune, not necessarily because it needs it, but because a certain amount of robo-voice is expected these days).

Derived terms

Noun

aside (plural asides)

  1. An incidental remark made quietly so as to be heard by the person to whom it is said and not by any others in the vicinity.
  2. (theatre) A brief comment by a character addressing the audience, unheard by other characters.

Translations

Anagrams


Turkish

Noun

aside

  1. dative singular of asit