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Webster 1913 Edition


Ik

Ik

,
p
ron.
[See
I
.]
I.
[Obs.]
Piers Plowman.
☞ The Northern dialectic form of I, in Early English, corresponding to ich of the Southern.

Definition 2022


ik

ik

See also: IK, -ik, ik', and ik-

English

Wiktionary does not have any English dictionary entry for this term. This is most likely because this term does not meet our criteria for inclusion yet.
Some information about this term is available in Wiktionary's entry on the Southern dialectal variant of this pronoun, ich, and in Wiktionary's entry on I.
You can help us collect durably archived uses of this word at Citations:ik.
If this term meets our criteria for inclusion, please create an entry for it or request that it be created.

Angguruk Yali

Noun

ik

  1. water

References


Danish

Adverb

ik

  1. Alternative form of ik'

Dutch

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪk
  • IPA(key): /ɪk/ (stressed), IPA(key): /ək/ (unstressed)

Etymology

From Middle Dutch ic, from Old Dutch ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Low German ik, West Frisian ik, German ich, English I, Danish jeg. See I (English, etymology 3).[1]

Pronoun

ik

  1. First-person singular, subjective: I.

Inflection


References

  1. Friedrich Kluge, “Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache” , 22. Auflage, 1989, bearbeitet von Elmar Seebold, ISBN 3-11-006800-1

German Low German

Alternative forms

  • 'k, 'ck (enclitic)
  • ick
  • (Eastphalia, Lippe, County of Mark, Ruhr area) ek, eck
  • (Low Prussian) öck, eck

Etymology

From Middle Low German ik, from Old Saxon ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪk/, /ek/

Pronoun

ik

  1. (most northern and western dialects) I (first person singular pronoun)
    Ik kem, ik sach, ik wünd.
    I came, I saw, I conquered. (Veni, vidi, vici. Attributed to Julius Caesar.)
    • 2012, Wilma Schlüter, Ik küer Platt: de Johrestieten int Münsterland (ISBN 3000392629)

Related terms

  • mien (my, mine, possessive); mi (me, dative (also generally used in place of the accusative)); mik; wi (we, plural)

See also

  • (Plautdietsch) ekj, etj

Gothic

Romanization

ik

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌺

Latvian

Adverb

ik

  1. every

Marshallese

Noun

ik

  1. Alternative spelling of ek

Middle English

Alternative forms

Pronoun

ik

  1. (chiefly Northern dialectal) I.
    • circa 1300, Homilies:
      Forthi wil I of my pouert, Schau sum thing that ik haf in hert, [...]
    • circa 1300, Cursor Mundi:
      Her ik haf a litil spend, In word eftir þat ik entend, [...]
    • circa 1390, Chaucer:
      But ik am oold me list not pleye for age.

Descendants

  • Scots: ik

Middle Low German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪk/

Etymology

From Old Saxon ik, from Proto-Germanic *ik.

Pronoun

ik

  1. I (personal pronoun, first person, singular, nominative)

Declension


Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Saxon ik, Old Frisian ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun

ik

  1. I

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: ic
    • Dutch: ik

Old Frisian

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Saxon ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun

ik

  1. I

Declension

Descendants

  • Saterland Frisian: iek
  • West Frisian: ik

Old Saxon

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Frisian ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun

ik

  1. I

Declension

Descendants

  • German Low German: ik

Pass Valley Yali

Noun

ik

  1. water

References


Pwaamei

Noun

ik

  1. louse

References

  • Jim Hollyman, K. J. Hollyman, Études sur les langues du Nord de la Nouvelle-Calédonie (1999), page 52

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English ik, from Old English ic (I, pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *ek (I, pronoun).

Pronoun

ik

  1. (rare) I. Now mostly used to be emphatical.
    Wha did that? Ik!(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    • circa 1375, John Barbour, The Bruce:
      For Ik am he, I say the soithly, [...]

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare North Frisian ick, Dutch ik, German Low German ik, German ich, English I, Danish jeg.

Pronoun

ik

  1. I