Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Note

Note

(nōt)
,
Verb.
T.
[AS.
hnītan
to strike against, imp.
hnāt
.]
To butt; to push with the horns.
[Prov. Eng.]

Note

(nōt)
.
[AS.
nāt
;
ne
not +
wāt
wot. See
Not
, and
Wot
.]
Know not; knows not.
[Obs.]

Note

,
Noun.
Nut.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.

Note

,
Noun.
[AS.
notu
use, profit.]
Need; needful business.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.

Note

,
Noun.
[F.
note
, L.
nota
; akin to
noscere
,
notum
, to know. See
Know
.]
1.
A mark or token by which a thing may be known; a visible sign; a character; a distinctive mark or feature; a characteristic quality.
Whosoever appertain to the visible body of the church, they have also the
notes
of external profession.
Hooker.
She [the Anglican church] has the
note
of possession, the
note
of freedom from party titles,the
note
of life – a tough life and a vigorous.
J. H. Newman.
What a
note
of youth, of imagination, of impulsive eagerness, there was through it all !
Mrs. Humphry Ward.
2.
A mark, or sign, made to call attention, to point out something to notice, or the like; a sign, or token, proving or giving evidence.
3.
A brief remark; a marginal comment or explanation; hence, an annotation on a text or author; a comment; a critical, explanatory, or illustrative observation.
The best writers have been perplexed with
notes
, and obscured with illustrations.
Felton.
4.
A brief writing intended to assist the memory; a memorandum; a minute.
5.
pl.
Hence, a writing intended to be used in speaking; memoranda to assist a speaker, being either a synopsis, or the full text of what is to be said;
as, to preach from
notes
; also, a reporter’s memoranda; the original report of a speech or of proceedings.
6.
A short informal letter; a billet.
7.
A diplomatic missive or written communication.
8.
A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt, and promising payment;
as, a promissory
note
; a
note
of hand; a negotiable
note
.
9.
A list of items or of charges; an account.
[Obs.]
Here is now the smith's
note
for shoeing.
Shakespeare
10.
(Mus.)
(a)
A character, variously formed, to indicate the length of a tone, and variously placed upon the staff to indicate its pitch. Hence:
(b)
A musical sound; a tone; an utterance; a tune.
(c)
A key of the piano or organ.
The wakeful bird . . . tunes her nocturnal
note
.
Milton.
That
note
of revolt against the eighteenth century, which we detect in Goethe, was struck by Winckelmann.
W. Pater.
11.
Observation; notice; heed.
Give orders to my servants that they take
No
note
at all of our being absent hence.
Shakespeare
12.
Notification; information; intelligence.
[Obs.]
The king . . . shall have
note
of this.
Shakespeare
13.
State of being under observation.
[Obs.]
Small matters . . . continually in use and in
note
.
Bacon.
14.
Reputation; distinction;
as, a poet of
note
.
There was scarce a family of
note
which had not poured out its blood on the field or the scaffold.
Prescott.
15.
Stigma; brand; reproach.
[Obs.]
Shak.
Note of hand
,
a promissory note.

Note

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Noted
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Noting
.]
[F.
noter
, L.
notare
, fr.
nota
. See
Note
,
Noun.
]
1.
To notice with care; to observe; to remark; to heed; to attend to.
Pope.
No more of that; I have
noted
it well.
Shakespeare
2.
To record in writing; to make a memorandum of.
Every unguarded word . . . was
noted
down.
Maccaulay.
3.
To charge, as with crime (with of or for before the thing charged); to brand.
[Obs.]
They were both
noted
of incontinency.
Dryden.
4.
To denote; to designate.
Johnson.
5.
To annotate.
[R.]
W. H. Dixon.
6.
To set down in musical characters.
To note a bill
or
To note a draft
,
to record on the back of it a refusal of acceptance, as the ground of a protest, which is done officially by a notary.

Webster 1828 Edition


Note

NOTE

, for ne wote, knew not or could not.

NOTE

,
Noun.
[L. to know.]
1.
A mark or token; something by which a thing may be known; a visible sign.
They who appertain to the visible church have all the notes of external profession.
2.
A mark made in a book, indicating something worthy of a particular notice.
3.
A short remark; a passage or explanation in the margin of a book.
4.
A minute, memorandum or short writing intended to assist the memory.
5.
Notice; heed.
Give order to my servants that they take no note at all of our being absent hence.
6.
Reputation; consequence; distinction; as men of note. Acts 16.
7.
State of being observed.
Small matters, continually in use and note. [Little used.]
8.
In music, a character which marks a sound, or the sound itself; as a semibreve, a minim, &c. Notes are marks of sounds in relation to elevation or depresion, or to the time of continuing sounds.
9.
Tune; voice; harmonious or melocious sounds.
The wakeful bird tunes her nocturnal note.
One common note on either lyre did strike.
10.
Abbreviation; symbol.
11.
A short letter; a billet.
12.
Annotation; commentary; as the notes in Scott's Bible; to write notes on Homer.
13.
A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt and promising payment; as a promissory note; a bank-note; a note of hand; a negotiable note.
14.
Notes, plu. a writing; a written discourse; applied equally to minutes or heads of a discourse or argument, or to a discourse fully written. The advocate often has notes to assist his memory, and clergymen preach with notes or without them.
15.
A diplomatic communication in writing; an official paper sent from one minister or envoy to another.
My note of January 10th still remains unanswered.

NOTE

, v.t.
1.
To observe; to notice with particular care; to heed; to attend to.
No more of that; I have noted it well.
Their manners noted and their states survey'd.
2.
To set down in writing.
Note it in a book. Isaiah 30.
3.
To charge, as with a crime; with of or for.
They were both noted of incontinency.

NOTE

,
Verb.
T.
To butt; to push with the horns. [Not used.]

Definition 2022


Note

Note

See also: note, noté, and Nöte

English

Proper noun

The Note

  1. (informal) The St. Louis Blues hockey team.

German

Pronunciation

Noun

Note f (genitive Note, plural Noten)

  1. (music) note (character indicating the length and pitch of a tone)
  2. (diplomacy) note
  3. (school) grade, mark

Declension

Synonyms

Derived terms

Usage notes

The musical sense is used only of a written character. "Note" in the sense of a pitch or tone is rendered by Ton. The plural Noten also means "music" in the sense of written music such as sheet music.

note

note

See also: Note, noté, and Nöte

English

Noun

note (countable and uncountable, plural notes)

  1. (heading) A symbol or annotation.
    1. A mark or token by which a thing may be known; a visible sign; a character; a distinctive mark or feature; a characteristic quality.
      • Richard Hooker (1554-1600)
        Whosoever appertain to the visible body of the church, they have also the notes of external profession.
      • John Henry Newman (1801-1890)
        She [the Anglican church] has the note of possession, the note of freedom from party titles, the note of life a tough life and a vigorous.
      • Mrs Humphry Ward (1851-1920)
        What a note of youth, of imagination, of impulsive eagerness, there was through it all!
      • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess:
        The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. No one queried it. It was in the classic pattern of human weakness, mean and embarrassing and sad.
    2. A mark, or sign, made to call attention, to point out something to notice, or the like; a sign, or token, proving or giving evidence.
    3. A brief remark; a marginal comment or explanation; hence, an annotation on a text or author; a comment; a critical, explanatory, or illustrative observation.
  2. (heading) A written or printed communication or commitment.
    1. A brief piece of writing intended to assist the memory; a memorandum; a minute.
      I left him a note to remind him to take out the trash.
    2. A short informal letter; a billet.
    3. A diplomatic missive or written communication.
    4. (finance) A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt, and promising payment
      a promissory note
      a note of hand
      a negotiable note
    5. (obsolete) A list of items or of charges; an account.
    6. A piece of paper money; a banknote.
      I didn't have any coins to pay with, so I used a note.
    7. (extension) A small size of paper used for writing letters or notes.
  3. (music, heading) A sound.
    1. A character, variously formed, to indicate the length of a tone, and variously placed upon the staff to indicate its pitch.
    2. A musical sound; a tone; an utterance; a tune.
      • John Milton (1608-1674)
        The wakeful bird [] tunes her nocturnal note.
      • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, in The Celebrity:
        Judge Short had gone to town, and Farrar was off for a three days' cruise up the lake. I was bitterly regretting I had not gone with him when the distant notes of a coach horn reached my ear, and I descried a four-in-hand winding its way up the inn road from the direction of Mohair.
      • 1922, Michael Arlen, “Ep./4/2”, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days:
        As they turned into Hertford Street they startled a robin from the poet's head on a barren fountain, and he fled away with a cameo note.
    3. (extension) A key of the piano or organ.
  4. (uncountable) Observation; notice; heed.
    • Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
      small matters [] continually in use and in note
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      Give orders to my servants that they take / No note at all of our being absent hence.
  5. (uncountable) Reputation; distinction.
    a poet of note
  6. (obsolete) Notification; information; intelligence.
  7. (obsolete) Stigma; brand; reproach.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

note (third-person singular simple present notes, present participle noting, simple past and past participle noted)

  1. (transitive) To notice with care; to observe; to remark; to heed.
    If you look to the left, you can note the old cathedral.
  2. (transitive) To record in writing; to make a memorandum of.
    We noted his speech.
  3. (transitive) To denote; to designate.
    The modular multiplicative inverse of x may be noted x-1.
  4. (transitive) To annotate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of W. H. Dixon to this entry?)
  5. (transitive) To set down in musical characters.
  6. (transitive) To record on the back of (a bill, draft, etc.) a refusal of acceptance, as the ground of a protest, which is done officially by a notary.
Derived terms
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

From Middle English note (use, usefulness, profit), from Old English notu (use, enjoyment, advantage, profit, utility), from Proto-Germanic *nutō (enjoyment, utilisation), from Proto-Indo-European *newd- (to acquire, make use of). Cognate with West Frisian not (yield, produce, crop), Dutch genot (enjoyment, pleasure), Dutch nut (usefulness, utility, behoof), German Nutzen (benefit, usefulness, utility), Icelandic not (use, noun). Related also to Old English notian (to enjoy, make use of, employ), Old English nēotan (to use, enjoy), Old High German niozan (to use, enjoy), Modern German benutzen (to use). Related to nait.

Alternative forms

  • noit, noyt (Northern England)
  • not (Shetland)

Noun

note (usually uncountable, plural notes)

  1. (uncountable, Britain dialectal, Northern England, Ireland, Scotland) That which is needed or necessary; business; duty; work.
    • 1701, Halliwell:
      But thefte serveth of wykked note, Hyt hangeth hys mayster by the throte.
    • 1838, William Marriott, William Marriott (Ph. Dr.), A collection of English miracle-plays or mysteries (The Deluge):
      And have thou that for thy note!
    • 1897, Halifax Courier:
      Tha'll keep me at this noit all day... Om always at this noit.
    • 1962, Arthur C. Cawley, Everyman, and Medieval Miracle Plays, page 125:
      Thou canst do thy note; that have I espied.
    • 1991, Geoffrey Chaucer, Michael Murphy, The Canterbury Tales:
      The miller goes again; no word he said, But does his note and with the clerks he played, [...]
  2. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Ireland, Scotland) The giving of milk by a cow or sow; the period following calving or farrowing during which a cow or sow is at her most useful (i.e. gives milk); the milk given by a cow or sow during such a period.
    • 1843, The Farmer's Magazine, page 384:
      The supply of horned cattle at this fair was great, but the business done was confined to fleshy barreners of feeding qualities and superior new-calved heifers, and those at early note, with appearance of being useful; [...]
    • 1875, Belfast Paper:
      For sale, a Kerry cow, five years old, at her note in May.
    • 1888, S. O. Addy Gloss, Words Sheffield, page 160:
      A cow is said to be in note when she is in milk.
    • 1922, P. MacGill, Lanty Hanlon page 11:
      A man who drank spring water when his one cow was near note.
    • 1996, C. I. Macafee Conc., Ulster Dict. at Note:
      Be at her note, be near note, come forward to her note, of a cow or sow, be near the time for calving or farrowing.
Derived terms

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: fall · pass · doing · #547: note · pay · red · unto

Anagrams


Danish

Etymology 1

From English note, from Italian nota, from Latin nota.

Noun

note c (singular definite noten, plural indefinite noter)

  1. note
Inflection
Synonyms

Etymology 2

Verb

note

  1. (mechanics) To supply a board to a groove.
Conjugation

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin nota.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɔt/

Noun

note f (plural notes)

  1. note (written or spoken)
  2. mark (UK), grade (US)
  3. bill (UK, US), check (US)
  4. (music) note
  5. touch, hint, note

Derived terms

Verb

note

  1. first-person singular present indicative of noter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of noter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of noter
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of noter
  5. second-person singular imperative of noter

Galician

Verb

note

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of notar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of notar

Italian

Adjective

note

  1. feminine plural of noto

Noun

note f

  1. plural of nota

Anagrams


Latin

Participle

nōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of nōtus

Norman

Noun

note f (plural notes)

  1. (Jersey) tune

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin nota

Noun

note m (definite singular noten, indefinite plural noter, definite plural notene)

  1. (music) a note
  2. a note in a book or text
  3. a note (communication between governments)
  4. a banknote

Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin nota

Noun

note m (definite singular noten, indefinite plural notar, definite plural notane)

  1. (music) a note
  2. a note in a book or text
  3. a note (communication between governments)
  4. a banknote

Derived terms

References


Portuguese

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈnowt͡ʃ/, /ˈnɔt͡ʃ/

Noun

note m (plural notes)

  1. (computing) Short for notebook (notebook computer).

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈnɔ.t͡ʃi/

Verb

note

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of notar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of notar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of notar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of notar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈnote]

Noun

note f pl

  1. plural of notă

Scots

Alternative forms

Etymology 1

From Middle English not, note, noote, from Old English notu (use; utility; benefit), from Proto-Germanic *nutō (use; enjoyment). More at note.

Noun

note (uncountable)

  1. use; benefit
  2. necessity; occasion
  3. business; employment
  4. task; duty
  5. purpose; function; office

Etymology 2

From Middle English noten, notien, from Old English notian (to make use of; employ; enjoy), from Proto-Germanic *nutōną (to make use of; enjoy).

Verb

note (third-person singular present notes, present participle notin, past nott, past participle nott or notten)

  1. To use; employ; make use of
  2. To need



Spanish

Verb

note

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of notar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of notar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of notar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of notar.

Venetian

Etymology

From Latin nox, noctem (compare Italian notte).

Noun

note f (plural noti)

  1. night