Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Pass

Pass

(pȧs, păs)
,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Passed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Passing
.]
[F.
passer
, LL.
passare
, fr. L.
passus
step, or from
pandere
,
passum
, to spread out, lay open. See
Pace
.]
1.
To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point to another; to make a transit; – usually with a following adverb or adverbal phrase defining the kind or manner of motion;
as, to
pass
on, by, out, in, etc.; to
pass
swiftly, directly, smoothly, etc.; to
pass
to the rear, under the yoke, over the bridge, across the field, beyond the border, etc.
“But now pass over [i. e., pass on].”
Chaucer.
On high behests his angels to and fro
Passed
frequent.
Milton.
Sweet sounds rose slowly through their mouths,
And from their bodies
passed
.
Coleridge.
2.
To move or be transferred from one state or condition to another; to change possession, condition, or circumstances; to undergo transition;
as, the business has
passed
into other hands
.
Others, dissatisfied with what they have, . . .
pass
from just to unjust.
Sir W. Temple.
3.
To move beyond the range of the senses or of knowledge; to pass away; hence, to disappear; to vanish; to depart; specifically, to depart from life; to die.
Disturb him not, let him
pass
paceably.
Shakespeare
Beauty is a charm, but soon the charm will
pass
.
Dryden.
The
passing
of the sweetest soul
That ever looked with human eyes.
Tennyson.
4.
To move or to come into being or under notice; to come and go in consciousness; hence, to take place; to occur; to happen; to come; to occur progressively or in succession; to be present transitorily.
So death
passed
upon all men.
Rom. v. 12.
Our own consciousness of what
passes
within our own mind.
I. Watts.
5.
To go by or glide by, as time; to elapse; to be spent;
as, their vacation
passed
pleasantly
.
Now the time is far
passed
.
Mark vi. 35
6.
To go from one person to another; hence, to be given and taken freely;
as, clipped coin will not
pass
; to obtain general acceptance; to be held or regarded; to circulate; to be current; – followed by for before a word denoting value or estimation.
“Let him pass for a man.”
Shak.
False eloquence
passeth
only where true is not understood.
Felton.
This will not
pass
for a fault in him.
Atterbury.
7.
To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to validity or effectiveness; to be carried through a body that has power to sanction or reject; to receive legislative sanction; to be enacted;
as, the resolution
passed
; the bill
passed
both houses of Congress.
8.
To go through any inspection or test successfully; to be approved or accepted;
as, he attempted the examination, but did not expect to
pass
.
9.
To be suffered to go on; to be tolerated; hence, to continue; to live along.
“The play may pass.”
Shak.
10.
To go unheeded or neglected; to proceed without hindrance or opposition;
as, we let this act
pass
.
11.
To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess.
[Obs.]
“This passes, Master Ford.”
Shak.
12.
To take heed; to care.
[Obs.]
As for these silken-coated slaves, I
pass
not.
Shakespeare
13.
To go through the intestines.
Arbuthnot.
14.
(Law)
To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance;
as, an estate
passes
by a certain clause in a deed
.
Mozley & W.
15.
(Fencing)
To make a lunge or pass; to thrust.
16.
(Card Playing)
To decline to play in one’s turn; in euchre, to decline to make the trump.
She would not play, yet must not
pass
.
Prior.
To bring to pass
,
To come to pass
.
See under
Bring
, and
Come
.
To pass away
,
to disappear; to die; to vanish.
“The heavens shall pass away.”
2 Pet. iii. 10.
“I thought to pass away before, but yet alive I am.”
Tennyson.
To pass by
,
to go near and beyond a certain person or place; as, he passed by as we stood there.
To pass into
,
to change by a gradual transmission; to blend or unite with.
To pass on
,
to proceed.
To pass on
or
To pass upon
.
(a)
To happen to; to come upon; to affect
. “So death passed upon all men.”
Rom. v. 12.
“Provided no indirect act pass upon our prayers to define them.”
Jer. Taylor.
(b)
To determine concerning; to give judgment or sentence upon.
“We may not pass upon his life.”
Shak.
To pass off
,
to go away; to cease; to disappear;
as, an agitation
passes off
.
To pass over
,
to go from one side or end to the other; to cross, as a river, road, or bridge.

Pass

,
Verb.
T.
1.
In simple, transitive senses; as:
(a)
To go by, beyond, over, through, or the like; to proceed from one side to the other of;
as, to
pass
a house, a stream, a boundary, etc.
(b)
Hence:
To go from one limit to the other of; to spend; to live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer.
“To pass commodiously this life.”
Milton.
She loved me for the dangers I had
passed
.
Shakespeare
(c)
To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard.
Please you that I may
pass
This doing.
Shakespeare
I
pass
their warlike pomp, their proud array.
Dryden.
(d)
To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed.
And strive to
pass
. . .
Their native music by her skillful art.
Spenser.
Whose tender power
Passes
the strength of storms in their most desolate hour.
Byron.
(e)
To go successfully through, as an examination, trail, test, etc.; to obtain the formal sanction of, as a legislative body;
as, he
passed
his examination; the bill
passed
the senate
.
2.
In causative senses: as:
(a)
To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over;
as, the waiter
passed
bisquit and cheese; the torch was
passed
from hand to hand
.
I had only time to
pass
my eye over the medals.
Addison.
Waller
passed
over five thousand horse and foot by Newbridge.
Clarendon.
(b)
To cause to pass the lips; to utter; to pronounce; hence, to promise; to pledge;
as, to
pass
sentence
.
Shak.
Father, thy word is
passed
.
Milton.
(c)
To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just;
as, he
passed
the bill through the committee; the senate
passed
the law
.
(e)
To put in circulation; to give currency to;
as, to
pass
counterfeit money
.
Pass the happy news.”
Tennyson.
(f)
To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance;
as, to
pass
a person into a theater, or over a railroad
.
3.
To emit from the bowels; to evacuate.
4.
(Naut.)
To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure.
5.
(Fencing)
To make, as a thrust, punto, etc.
Shak.
Passed midshipman
.
See under Midshipman.
To pass a dividend
,
to omit the declaration and payment of a dividend at the time when due.
To pass away
,
to spend; to waste.
“Lest she pass away the flower of her age.”
Ecclus. xlii. 9.
To pass by
.
(a)
To disregard; to neglect
.
(b)
To excuse; to spare; to overlook.
To pass off
,
to impose fraudulently; to palm off.
Passed himself off as a bishop.”
Macaulay.
To pass (something) on (some one)
or
To pass (something) upon (some one)
,
to put upon as a trick or cheat; to palm off.
“She passed the child on her husband for a boy.”
Dryden.
To pass over
,
to overlook; not to note or resent;
as, to
pass over
an affront
.

Pass

,
Noun.
[Cf. F.
pas
(for sense 1), and
passe
, fr.
passer
to pass. See
Pass
,
Verb.
I.
]
1.
An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier; a passageway; a defile; a ford;
as, a mountain
pass
.
“Try not the
pass
!” the old man said.
Longfellow.
2.
(Fencing)
A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary.
Shak.
3.
A movement of the hand over or along anything; the manipulation of a mesmerist.
4.
(Rolling Metals)
A single passage of a bar, rail, sheet, etc., between the rolls.
5.
State of things; condition; predicament.
Have his daughters brought him to this
pass
.
Shakespeare
Matters have been brought to this
pass
.
South.
6.
Permission or license to pass, or to go and come; a psssport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission;
as, a railroad or theater
pass
; a military
pass
.
A ship sailing under the flag and
pass
of an enemy.
Kent.
7.
Fig.: a thrust; a sally of wit.
Shak.
8.
Estimation; character.
[Obs.]
Common speech gives him a worthy
pass
.
Shakespeare
9.
[Cf.
Passus
.]
A part; a division.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.
Pass boat
(Naut.)
,
a punt, or similar boat.
Pass book
.
(a)
A book in which a trader enters articles bought on credit, and then passes or sends it to the purchaser
.
(b)
See
Bank book
.
Pass box
(Mil.)
,
a wooden or metallic box, used to carry cartridges from the service magazine to the piece.
Pass check
,
a ticket of admission to a place of entertainment, or of readmission for one who goes away in expectation of returning.

Webster 1828 Edition


Pass

P`ASS

,
Verb.
I.
[Eng. pat, and as a noun, a pass, a defile, an ambling, pace; passen, to be fit, to suit; L. patior, whence passion, to suffer, and peto, competo, in the sense of fit; Gr. to walk or step, to suffer; The word pass coincides with L. passus, a step, and this is from pando, L. passus, a step, and this is from pando, to extend; n being casual, the original word was pado.
1.
To move, in almost any manner; to go; to proceed from one place to another. A man may pass on foot, on horseback or in a carriage; a bird and a meteor pass through the air; a ship passes on or through the water; light passes from the sun to the planets; it passes from the sun to the earth in about eight minutes.
2.
To move from one state to another; to alter or change, or to be changed in condition; as, to pass from health to sickness; to pass from just to unjust.
3.
To vanish; to disappear; to be lost. In this sense, we usually say, to pass away.
Beauty is a charm, but soon the charm will pass.
4.
To be spent; to go on or away progressively.
The time when the thing existed, is the idea of that space of duration which passed between some fixed period and the being of that thing.
5.
To die; to depart from life. [Little used.]
6.
To be in any state; to undergo; with under; as, to pass under the rod.
7.
To be enacted; to receive the sanction of a legislative house or body by a majority of votes.
Neither of these bills has yet passed the house of commons.
8.
To be current; to gain reception or to be generally received. Bank bills pass as a substitute for coin.
False eloquence passeth only where true is not understood.
9.
To be regarded; to be received in opinion or estimation.
This will not pass for a fault in him, till it is proved to be one in us.
10. To occur; to be present; to take place; as, to notice what passes in the mind.
11. To be done.
Provided no indirect act pass upon our prayers to defile them.
12. To determine; to give judgment or sentence.
Though well we may not pass upon his life.
13. To thrust; to make a push in fencing or fighting.
14. To omit; to suffer to go unheeded or neglected. We saw the act, but let it pass.
15. To move through any duct or opening; as, substances in the stomach that will not pass, not be converted into ailment.
16. To percolate; to be secreted; as juices that pass from the glands into the mouth.
17. To be in a tolerable state.
A middling sort of man was left well enough by his father to pass,but he could never think he had enough, so long as any had more.
18. To be transferred from one owner to another. The land article passed by livery and seizin.
19. To go beyond bounds. For this we generally use surpass.
20. To run or extend; as a line or other thing. The north limit of Massachusetts passes three miles north of the Merrimac.
To come to pass, to happen; to arrive; to come; to be; to exist; a phrase much used in the Scriptures.
To pass away, to move from sight; to vanish.
1.
To be spent; to be lost.
A good part of their lives passes away without thinking.
To pass by, to move near and beyond. He passed by as we stood in the road.
To pass on, to proceed.
To pass over, to go or move from side to side; to cross; as, to pass over to the other side.
To pass into, to unite and blend, as two substances or colors, in such a manner that it is impossible to tell where one ends and the other begins.

P`ASS

,
Verb.
T.
To go beyond. The sun has passed the age of frivolousness.
1.
To go through or over; as, to pass a river.
2.
To spend; to live through; as, to pass time; to pass the night in revelry, and the day in sleep.
3.
To cause to move; to send; as, to pass the bottle from one guest to another; to pass a pauper from one town to another; to pass a rope round a yard; to pass the blood from the right to the left ventricle of the heart.
4.
To cause to move hastily.
I had only time to pass my eye over the medals, which are in great number.
5.
To transfer from one owner to another; to sell or assign; as, to pass land from A to B by deed; to pass a note or bill.
6.
To strain; to cause to percolate; as, to pass wine through a filter.
7.
To utter; to pronounce; as, to pass compliments; to pass sentence or judgment; to pass censure on another's works.
8.
To procure or cause to go.
Waller passed over five thousand horse and foot by Newbridge.
9.
To put an end to.
This night
We'll pass the business privately and well.
10. To omit; to neglect either to do or to mention.
I pass their warlike pomp, their proud array.
11. To transcend; to transgress or go beyond; as, to pass the bounds of moderation.
12. To admit; to allow; to approve and receive as valid or just; as, to pass an account at the war-office.
13. To approve or sanction by a constitutional or legal majority of votes; as, the house of representatives passed the bill. Hence,
14. To enact; to carry through all the forms necessary to give validity; as, the legislature passed the bill into a law.
15. To impose fraudulently; as, she passed the child on her husband for a boy.
16. To practice artfully; to cause to succeed; as, to pass a trick on one.
17. To surpass; to excel; to exceed.
18. To thrust; to make a push in fencing.
To see thee fight, to see thee pass thy puncto.
To pass away, to spend; to waste; as, to pass away the flower of like in idleness.
To pass by, to pass near and beyond.
1.
To overlook; to excuse; to forgive; not to censure or punish; as, to pass by a crime or fault.
2.
To neglect; to disregard.
Certain passages of Scripture we cannot pass by without injury to truth.
To pass over, to move from side to side; to cross; as, to pass over a river or mountain.
1.
To omit; to overlook or disregard. He passed over one charge without a reply.

P`ASS

,
Noun.
A narrow passage, entrance or avenue; a narrow or difficult place of entrance and exit; as a pass between mountains.
1.
A passage; a road.
2.
Permission to pass, to go or to come; a license to pass; a passport.
A gentleman had a pass to go beyond the seas.
A ship sailing under the flag and pass of an enemy.
3.
An order for sending vagrants or impotent persons to their place of abode.
4.
In fencing and fighting, a thrust; a push; attempt to stab or strike; as , to make a pass at an antagonist.
5.
State; condition or extreme case; extremity.
To what a pass are our minds brought.
Matters have been brought to this pass--

Definition 2021


Pass

Pass

See also: pass, Paß, and pass.

German

Alternative forms

Noun

Pass m (genitive Passes, plural Pässe)

  1. pass (between mountains)
  2. pass (document granting permission to pass)
  3. passport

Declension


Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɑs/
    Rhymes: -ɑs

Etymology 1

Noun

Pass m (plural Päss)

  1. pass (permission or license to pass)
  2. passport
  3. pass (road, e.g. a mountain pass)
Synonyms
  • (road): Col

Etymology 2

Borrowing from French passe.

Noun

Pass f (plural Passen)

  1. (sports) pass

pass

pass

See also: Pass, Paß, and pass.

English

Noun

pass (plural passes)

  1. An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier such as a mountain range; a passageway; a defile; a ford.
    a mountain pass
  2. A channel connecting a river or body of water to the sea, for example at the mouth (delta) of a river.
    the passes of the Mississippi
  3. A single movement, especially of a hand, at, over, or along anything.
    • 1921, John Griffin, "Trailing the Grizzly in Oregon", in Forest and Stream, pages 389-391 and 421-424, republished by Jeanette Prodgers in 1997 in The Only Good Bear is a Dead Bear, page 35:
      [The bear] made a pass at the dog, but he swung out and above him [...]
  4. A single passage of a tool over something, or of something over a tool.
  5. An attempt.
    My pass at a career of writing proved unsuccessful.
  6. (fencing) A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary.
  7. (figuratively) A thrust; a sally of wit.
  8. A sexual advance.
    The man kicked his friend out of the house after he made a pass at his wife.
  9. (sports) The act of moving the ball or puck from one player to another.
  10. (rail transport) A passing of two trains in the same direction on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other overtake it.
  11. Permission or license to pass, or to go and come.
    • (Can we date this quote?) James Kent:
      A ship sailing under the flag and pass of an enemy.
  12. A document granting permission to pass or to go and come; a passport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission
    a railroad pass; a theater pass; a military pass
  13. (baseball) An intentional walk.
    Smith was given a pass after Jones' double.
  14. The state of things; condition; predicament; impasse.
    • 1606 Shakespeare:
      What, have his daughters brought him to this pass?
    • (Can we date this quote?) Robert South:
      Matters have been brought to this pass, that, if one among a man's sons had any blemish, he laid him aside for the ministry...
  15. (obsolete) Estimation; character.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare:
      Common speech gives him a worthy pass.
  16. (obsolete, Chaucer) A part, a division. Compare passus.
  17. (cooking) The area in a restaurant kitchen where the finished dishes are passed from the chefs to the waiting staff.
  18. An act of declining to play one's turn in a game, often by saying the word "pass".
    A pass would have seen her win the game, but instead she gave a wrong answer and lost a point, putting her in second place.
  19. (computing) A run through a document as part of a translation, compilation or reformatting process.
    Most Pascal compilers process source code in a single pass.
Synonyms
  • (opening, road, or track, available for passing): gap
  • (fencing: thrust or push): thrust
  • (figurative: a thrust; a sally of wit):
  • (movement over or along anything):
  • (movement of a tool over something, or something other a tool): transit
  • (the state of things): condition, predicament, state
  • (permission or license to pass, or to go and come): access, admission, entry
  • (document granting permission to pass or to go and come):
  • (obsolete: estimation; character):
  • (obsolete: a part, a division):
Antonyms
  • (rail transport): meet
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English passen, from Old French passer (to step, walk, pass), from Vulgar Latin *passāre (step, walk, pass), from Latin passus (a step), pandere (to spread, unfold, stretch), from Proto-Indo-European *patno-, from Proto-Indo-European *pete- (to spread, stretch out). Cognate with Old English fæþm (armful, fathom). More at fathom.

Verb

pass (third-person singular simple present passes, present participle passing, simple past and past participle passed)

  1. (heading) Physical movement.
    1. (intransitive) To move or be moved from one place to another.
      They passed from room to room.
    2. (transitive) To go past, by, over, or through; to proceed from one side to the other of; to move past.
      You will pass a house on your right.
      • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
        We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine. We passed on the way the van of the guests from Asquith.
      • 1944, Miles Burton, chapter 5, in The Three Corpse Trick:
        The dinghy was trailing astern at the end of its painter, and Merrion looked at it as he passed. He saw that it was a battered-looking affair of the prahm type, with a blunt snout, and like the parent ship, had recently been painted a vivid green.
    3. (transitive) To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over.
      The waiter passed biscuits and cheese.
      The torch was passed from hand to hand.
    4. (intransitive, transitive, medicine) To eliminate (something) from the body by natural processes.
      He was passing blood in both his urine and his stool.
      The poison had been passed by the time of the autopsy.
    5. (transitive, nautical) To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure.
    6. (sports) To kick (the ball) with precision rather than at full force.
      1. (transitive, soccer) To kick (the ball) with precision rather than at full force.
        • The Guardian, Rob Smyth, 20 June 2010
          Iaquinta passes it coolly into the right-hand corner as Paston dives the other way.
      2. (transitive) To move (the ball or puck) to a teammate.
      3. (intransitive, fencing) To make a lunge or swipe.
    7. (intransitive) To go from one person to another.
    8. (transitive) To put in circulation; to give currency to.
      pass counterfeit money
    9. (transitive) To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance.
      pass a person into a theater or over a railroad
  2. (heading) To change in state or status, to advance.
    1. (intransitive) To change from one state to another.
      He passed from youth into old age.
    2. (intransitive) To depart, to cease, to come to an end.
      At first, she was worried, but that feeling soon passed.
      • (Can we date this quote?) John Dryden (1631-1700)
        Beauty is a charm, but soon the charm will pass.
      • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
        The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side, and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.
      • 1995, Penny Richards, The Greatest Gift of All:
        The crisis passed as she'd prayed it would, but it remained to be seen just how much damage had been done.
    3. (intransitive, often with "on" or "away") To die.
      His grandmother passed yesterday.
      His grandmother passed away yesterday.
      His grandmother passed on yesterday.
    4. (intransitive, transitive) To go successfully through (an examination, trail, test, etc.).
      He passed his examination.
      He attempted the examination, but did not expect to pass.
    5. (intransitive, transitive) To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to become valid or effective; to obtain the formal sanction of (a legislative body).
      Despite the efforts of the opposition, the bill passed.
      The bill passed both houses of Congress.
      The bill passed the Senate, but did not pass in the House.
      • 2012 March 1, William E. Carter, Merri Sue Carter, The British Longitude Act Reconsidered”, in American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 87:
        But was it responsible governance to pass the Longitude Act without other efforts to protect British seamen? Or might it have been subterfuge—a disingenuous attempt to shift attention away from the realities of their life at sea.
    6. (intransitive, law) To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance.
      The estate passes by the third clause in Mr Smith's deed to his son.
      When the old king passed away with only a daughter as an heir, the throne passed to a woman for the first time in centuries.
    7. (transitive) To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just.
      He passed the bill through the committee.
    8. (intransitive, law) To make a judgment on or upon a person or case.
      • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Book X:
        And within three dayes twelve knyghtes passed uppon hem; and they founde Sir Palomydes gylty, and Sir Saphir nat gylty, of the lordis deth.
    9. (transitive) To cause to pass the lips; to utter; to pronounce; to pledge.
  3. (heading) To move through time.
    1. (intransitive, of time) To elapse, to be spent.
      Their vacation passed pleasantly.
    2. (transitive, of time) To spend.
      What will we do to pass the time?
      • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton (1608-1674)
        To pass commodiously this life.
      • 1915, Mrs. Belloc Lowndes, The Lodger, chapter I:
        Thanks to that penny he had just spent so recklessly [on a newspaper] he would pass a happy hour, taken, for once, out of his anxious, despondent, miserable self. It irritated him shrewdly to know that these moments of respite from carking care would not be shared with his poor wife, with careworn, troubled Ellen.
      • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
        For, although Allan had passed his fiftieth year, [] , one had continued to think of him as a man of whipcord and iron, a natural source of untiring energy, a mechanism that would not wear out.
    3. (transitive) To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard.
      • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
        Please you that I may pass / This doing.
      • (Can we date this quote?) John Dryden (1631-1700)
        I pass their warlike pomp, their proud array.
    4. (intransitive) To continue.
    5. (intransitive) To proceed without hindrance or opposition.
    6. (transitive) To live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer.
      She loved me for the dangers I had passed.
    7. To go unheeded or neglected; to proceed without hindrance or opposition.
      You're late, but I'll let it pass.
  4. (intransitive) To happen.
    It will soon come to pass.
    • 1876, The Dilemma, Chapter LIII, republished in Littell's Living Age, series 5, volume 14, page 274:
      [] for the memory of what passed while at that place is almost blank.
  5. (heading) To be accepted.
    1. (intransitive) To be tolerated as a substitute for something else, to "do".
      It isn't ideal, but it will pass.
    2. (sociology) To present oneself as, and therefore be accepted by society as, a member of a race, sex or other group to which society would not otherwise regard one as belonging; especially to live and be known as white although one has black ancestry, or to live and be known as female although one was born male (or vice versa).
      Some male-to-female transsexuals can pass as female.
  6. (intransitive) In any game, to decline to play in one's turn.
    1. (intransitive) In euchre, to decline to make the trump.
  7. (heading) To do or be better.
    1. (intransitive, obsolete) To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess.
    2. (transitive) To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed.
      • (Can we date this quote?) Edmund Spenser (c.1552–1599)
        And strive to pass [] Their native music by her skillful art.
      • (Can we date this quote?) George Gordon Byron (1788-1824)
        Whose tender power Passes the strength of storms in their most desolate hour.
  8. (intransitive, obsolete) To take heed.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      As for these silken-coated slaves, I pass not.
  9. (intransitive) (Can we verify(+) this sense?) To come and go in and out of consciousness.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Short for password.

Noun

pass (plural passes)

  1. (computing, slang) A password (especially one for a restricted-access website).
    Anyone want to trade passes?
    • 1999, "Jonny Durango", IMPORTANT NEWS FOR AHM IRC CHAN!!! (on newsgroup alt.hackers.malicious)
      If you don't have your password set within a week I'll remove you from the userlist and I'll add you again next time I see you in the chan and make sure you set a pass.
Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: opened · purpose · fall · #545: pass · doing · note · pay

Anagrams


Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [pʰasː]

Noun

pass n (genitive singular pass, plural pass)

  1. passport

Declension

n11 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pass passið pass passini
Accusative pass passið pass passini
Dative passi passinum passum passunum
Genitive pass passins passa passanna

German

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -as

Verb

pass

  1. Imperative singular of passen.

Lombard

Etymology

From Latin passus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [pas]

Noun

pass ?

  1. step
  2. mountain pass

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

pass n (definite singular passet, indefinite plural pass, definite plural passa or passene)

  1. a passport (travel document)
  2. a pass (fjellpass - mountain pass)

Derived terms

Verb

pass

  1. imperative of passe

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

pass n (definite singular passet, indefinite plural pass, definite plural passa)

  1. a passport (travel document)
  2. a pass (mountain pass)

Derived terms

References


Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From German, originally from Italian passo.

Noun

pass n

  1. passport (document granting permission to pass)
  2. place which you (must) pass or is passing; pass (between mountains)
  3. pace; a kind of gait
  4. place where a hunter hunts; place where a policeman patrols
  5. spell (a period of duty)
  6. leave notice (document granting permission to leave) (from prison)
Declension
Inflection of pass 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pass passet pass passen
Genitive pass passets pass passens
Derived terms
  • passa
  • passlig
  • till pass
Synonyms
  • leave notice: permissionssedel, permissionspass

Etymology 2

Noun

pass c

  1. (ball sports) pass; a transfer of the ball from one player to another in the same team
Declension
Inflection of pass 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pass passen passar passarna
Genitive pass passens passars passarnas
Derived terms
Synonyms
  • passning