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Webster 1913 Edition


New

New

(nū)
,
Adj.
[
Com
par.
Newer
(nū′ẽr)
;
sup
erl.
Newest
.]
[OE. OE.
newe
, AS.
niwe
,
neowe
; akin to D.
nieuw
, OS.
niwi
, OHG.
niuwi
, G.
neu
, Icel.
nȳr
, Dan. & Sw.
ny
, Goth.
niujis
, Lith.
naujas
, Russ.
novuii
, Ir.
nua
,
nuadh
, Gael.
nuadh
, W.
newydd
, Armor.
nevez
, L.
novus
, Gr.
νέος
, Skr.
nava
, and prob. to E.
now
. √263. See
Now
, and cf.
Announce
,
Innovate
,
Neophyte
,
Novel
.]
1.
Having existed, or having been made, but a short time; having originated or occured lately; having recently come into existence, or into one’s possession; not early or long in being; of late origin; recent; fresh; modern; – opposed to
old
,
as, a
new
coat; a
new
house; a
new
book; a
new
fashion.
“Your new wife.”
Chaucer.
2.
Not before seen or known, although existing before; lately manifested; recently discovered;
as, a
new
metal; a
new
planet;
new
scenes.
3.
Newly beginning or recurring; starting anew; now commencing; different from what has been;
as, a
new
year; a
new course
or direction.
4.
As if lately begun or made; having the state or quality of original freshness; also, changed for the better; renovated; unworn; untried; unspent;
as, rest and travel made him a
new
man
.
Steadfasty purposing to lead a
new
life.
Bk. of Com. Prayer.
Men after long emaciating diets, fat, and almost
new
.
Bacon.
5.
Not of ancient extraction, or of a family of ancient descent; not previously known or famous.
Addison.
6.
Not habituated; not familiar; unaccustomed.
New
to the plow, unpracticed in the trace.
Pope.
7.
Fresh from anything; newly come.
New
from her sickness to that northern air.
Dryden.
New birth
.
See under
Birth
.
New Church
, or
New Jerusalem Church
,
the church holding the doctrines taught by
Emanuel Swedenborg
. See
Swedenborgian
.
New heart
(Theol.)
,
a heart or character changed by the power of God, so as to be governed by new and holy motives.
New land
,
land cleared and cultivated for the first time.
New light
.
(Zool.)
See
Crappie
.
New moon
.
(a)
The moon in its first quarter, or when it first appears after being invisible.
(b)
The day when the new moon is first seen; the first day of the lunar month, which was a holy day among the Jews.
2 Kings iv. 23.
New Red Sandstone
(Geol.)
,
an old name for the formation immediately above the coal measures or strata, now divided into the
Permian
and
Trias
.
See
Sandstone
. –
New style
.
See
Style
.
New testament
.
See under
Testament
.
New world
,
the land of the Western Hemisphere; – so called because not known to the inhabitants of the Eastern Hemisphere until recent times.
Syn. – Novel; recent; fresh; modern. See
Novel
.

New

(nū)
,
adv.
Newly; recently.
Chaucer.
New
is much used in composition, adverbially, in the sense of newly, recently, to qualify other words, as in
new
-born,
new
-formed,
new
-found,
new
-mown.
Of new
,
anew.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.

New

,
Verb.
T.
&
I.
To make new; to renew.
[Obs.]

Webster 1828 Edition


New

NEW

,
Adj.
1.
Lately made, invented, produced or come into being; that has existed a short time only; recent in origin; novel; opposed to old, and used of things; as a new coat; a new house; a new book; a new fashion; a new theory; the new chimistry; a new discovery.
2.
Lately introduced to our knowledge; not before known; recently discovered; as a new metal; a new species of animals or plants found in foreign countries; the new continent.
3.
Modern; not ancient.
4.
Recently produced by change; as a new life.
Put on the new man. Ephesians 4.
5.
Not habituated; not familiar; unaccustomed.
Heretics and such as instill their poison into new minds.
New to the plough, unpracticed in the trace.
6.
Renovated; repaired so as to recover the first state.
Men, after long emaciating diets, wax plump, fat and almost new.
7.
Fresh after any event.
New from her sickness to that northern air.
8.
Not of ancient extraction or a family of ancient distinction.
By superior capacity and extensive knowledge, a new man often mounts to favor.
9.
Not before used; strange; unknown.
They shall speak with new tongues. Mark 16.
10.
Recently commenced; as the new year.
11.
Having passed the change or conjunction with the sun; as the new moon.
12.
Not cleared and cultivated, or lately cleared; as new land.
13.
That has lately appeared for the first time; as a new star.
New is much used in composition to qualify other words, and always bears its true sense of late, recent, novel, fresh; as in new-born, new-made, new-grown, new-formed, new-found. In this use, new may be considered as adverbial, or as a part of the compound.

NEW

,
Verb.
T.
To make new. [Not used.]

Definition 2021


New

New

See also: new, ñew, and new-

English

Proper noun

New

  1. A surname.
    • 1980, John Douglas Sinks, ‎Karen Mirinda Cain, Sinks: A Family History, p. 9:
      The surname, "New," appears on both Hampshire Co., Virginia and Pendleton Co., Kentucky records.

Anagrams

new

new

See also: New, new-, and ñew

English

Adjective

new (comparative newer, superlative newest)

  1. Recently made, or created.
    • 2013 July 19, Timothy Garton Ash, Where Dr Pangloss meets Machiavelli”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 18:
      Hidden behind thickets of acronyms and gorse bushes of detail, a new great game is under way across the globe. Some call it geoeconomics, but it's geopolitics too. The current power play consists of an extraordinary range of countries simultaneously sitting down to negotiate big free trade and investment agreements.
    This is a new scratch on my car!   The band just released a new album.
  2. Additional; recently discovered.
    We turned up some new evidence from the old files.
  3. Current or later, as opposed to former.
    My new car is much better than my previous one, even though it is older.   We had been in our new house for five years by then.
  4. Used to distinguish something established more recently, named after something or some place previously existing.
    New Bond Street is an extension of Bond Street.
  5. In original condition; pristine; not previously worn or used.
    Are you going to buy a new car or a second-hand one?
  6. Refreshed, reinvigorated, reformed.
    That shirt is dirty. Go and put on a new one.   I feel like a new person after a good night's sleep.   After the accident, I saw the world with new eyes.
  7. Newborn.
    My sister has a new baby, and our mother is excited to finally have a grandchild.
  8. Of recent origin; having taken place recently.
    I can't see you for a while; the pain is still too new.   Did you see the new King Lear at the theatre?
  9. Strange, unfamiliar or not previously known.
    • 2013 July 6, The rise of smart beta”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8843, page 68:
      Investors face a quandary. Cash offers a return of virtually zero in many developed countries; government-bond yields may have risen in recent weeks but they are still unattractive. Equities have suffered two big bear markets since 2000 and are wobbling again. It is hardly surprising that pension funds, insurers and endowments are searching for new sources of return.
    The idea was new to me.   I need to meet new people.
  10. Recently arrived or appeared.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      'Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.
    Have you met the new guy in town?   He is the new kid at school.
  11. Inexperienced or unaccustomed at some task.
    Don't worry that you're new at this job; you'll get better with time.   I'm new at this business.
  12. (of a period of time) Next; about to begin or recently begun.
    We expect to grow at 10% annually in the new decade.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Translations

Adverb

new (comparative more new, superlative most new)

  1. Newly (especially in composition).
    new-born, new-formed, new-found, new-mown
  2. As new; from scratch.
    They are scraping the site clean to build new.

Related terms

Noun

new (uncountable)

  1. Things that are new.
    Out with the old, in with the new.
  2. (Australia) A kind of light beer.
  3. (in the plural) See news.

Derived terms

Verb

new (third-person singular simple present news, present participle newing, simple past and past participle newed)

  1. (obsolete) To make new; to renew.

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: three · put · once · #167: new · years · always · another

Anagrams


German

Adjective

new (comparative newer, superlative am newesten or am newsten)

  1. Obsolete spelling of neu
    • 1552, Hans Gerle, Ein Newes sehr künstlichs Lautenbuch (printed in Nürnberg)
    • 1581, Ein new Kochbuch / Das ist Ein grundtliche beschreibung [] (printed in Frankfurt am Main)
    • 1629, Johann Deucer, Ein Newes, Schönes, sehr Nützliches Betbuch (printed in Leipzig)
    • 1653, Ein newes Lied: Welches bey der Römischen Königlichen Crönung Ferdinandi deß Vierten in Regenspürg den 18. Junij 1653 ist musiciert worden
    • 1706, Moritz Pfleyer, Gedeonische Wunder-Fakel auff ein newes entzündt in dem glorwürdigen heiligen Blut-Zeugen Christi Leontio

Declension


Zazaki

Numeral

new

  1. (cardinal) nine