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Webster 1913 Edition


Strange

Strange

,
Adj.
[
Com
par.
Stranger
;
sup
erl.
Strangest
.]
[OE.
estrange
, F.
étrange
, fr. L.
extraneus
that is without, external, foreign, fr.
extra
on the outside. See
Extra
, and cf.
Estrange
,
Extraneous
.]
1.
Belonging to another country; foreign.
“To seek strange strands.”
Chaucer.
One of the
strange
queen’s lords.
Shakespeare
I do not contemn the knowledge of
strange
and divers tongues.
Ascham.
2.
Of or pertaining to others; not one's own; not pertaining to one's self; not domestic.
So she, impatient her own faults to see,
Turns from herself, and in
strange
things delights.
Sir J. Davies.
3.
Not before known, heard, or seen; new.
Here is the hand and seal of the duke; you know the character, I doubt not; and the signet is not
strange
to you.
Shakespeare
4.
Not according to the common way; novel; odd; unusual; irregular; extraordinary; unnatural; queer.
“He is sick of a strange fever.”
Shak.
Sated at length, erelong I might perceive
Strange
alteration in me.
Milton.
5.
Reserved; distant in deportment.
Shak.
She may be
strange
and shy at first, but will soon learn to love thee.
Hawthorne.
6.
Backward; slow.
[Obs.]
Who, loving the effect, would not be
strange

In favoring the cause.
Beau. & Fl.
7.
Not familiar; unaccustomed; inexperienced.
In thy fortunes am unlearned and
strange
.
Shakespeare
Strange is often used as an exclamation.
Strange
! what extremes should thus preserve the snow
High on the Alps, or in deep caves below.
Waller.
Strange sail
(Naut.)
,
an unknown vessel.
Strange woman
(Script.)
,
a harlot.
Prov. v. 3.
To make it strange
.
(a)
To assume ignorance, suspicion, or alarm, concerning it
.
Shak.
(b)
To make it a matter of difficulty.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.
To make strange
,
To make one's self strange
.
(a)
To profess ignorance or astonishment
.
(b)
To assume the character of a stranger
.
Gen. xlii. 7.
Syn. – Foreign; new; outlandish; wonderful; astonishing; marvelous; unusual; odd; uncommon; irregular; queer; eccentric.

Strange

,
adv.
Strangely.
[Obs.]
Most
strange
, but yet most truly, will I speak.
Shakespeare

Strange

,
Verb.
T.
To alienate; to estrange.
[Obs.]

Strange

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To be estranged or alienated.
[Obs.]
2.
To wonder; to be astonished.
[Obs.]
Glanvill.

Webster 1828 Edition


Strange

STRANGE

,
Adj.
[L.]
1.
Foreign; belonging to anther country.
I do not contemn the knowledge of strange and divers tongues. [This sense is nearly obsolete.
2.
Not domestic; belonging to others.
So she impatient her own faults to see, turns from herself, and in strange things delights. [Nearly obsolete.]
3.
New; not before known, heard or seen. The former custom was familiar; the latter was new and strange to them. Hence,
4.
Wonderful; causing surprise; exciting curiosity. It is strange that men will not receive improvement, when it is shown to be improvement.
Sated at length, ere long I might perceive strange alteration in me.
5.
Odd; unusual; irregular; not according to the common way.
Hes strange and peevish.
6.
Remote. [Little used.]
7.
Uncommon; unusual.
This made David to admire the law of god at that strange rate.
8.
Unacquainted.
They were now at a gage, looking strange at one another.
9.
Strange is sometimes uttered by way of exclamation.
Strange! What extremes should thus preserve the snow, high on the Alps, or in deep caves below.
This is an elliptical expression for it is strange.

STRANGE

,
Verb.
T.
To alienate; to estrange. [Not in use.]

STRANGE

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To wonder; to be astonished. [Not in use.]
2.
To be estranged or alienated. [Not in use.]

Definition 2022


Strange

Strange

See also: strange, strânge, and Stränge

English

Proper noun

Strange

  1. A surname.

strange

strange

See also: Strange, strânge, and Stränge

English

Adjective

strange (comparative stranger, superlative strangest)

  1. Not normal; odd, unusual, surprising, out of the ordinary.
    He thought it strange that his girlfriend wore shorts in the winter.
    • Milton
      Sated at length, erelong I might perceive / Strange alteration in me.
  2. Unfamiliar, not yet part of one's experience.
    I moved to a strange town when I was ten.
    • Shakespeare
      Here is the hand and seal of the duke; you know the character, I doubt not; and the signet is not strange to you.
    • 1955, Rex Stout, "The Next Witness", in Three Witnesses, October 1994 Bantam edition, ISBN 0553249592, pages 48–49:
      She's probably sitting there hoping a couple of strange detectives will drop in.
  3. (physics) Having the quantum mechanical property of strangeness.
    • 2004 Frank Close, Particle Physics: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford, page 93:
      A strange quark is electrically charged, carrying an amount -1/3, as does the down quark.
  4. (obsolete) Belonging to another country; foreign.
    • Shakespeare
      one of the strange queen's lords
    • Ascham
      I do not contemn the knowledge of strange and divers tongues.
  5. (obsolete) Reserved; distant in deportment.
    • Shakespeare
      She may be strange and shy at first, but will soon learn to love thee.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Nathaniel Hawthorne to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete) Backward; slow.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      Who, loving the effect, would not be strange / In favouring the cause.
  7. (obsolete) Not familiar; unaccustomed; inexperienced.
    • Shakespeare
      In thy fortunes am unlearned and strange.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

strange (third-person singular simple present stranges, present participle stranging, simple past and past participle stranged)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To alienate; to estrange.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To be estranged or alienated.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To wonder; to be astonished.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Glanvill to this entry?)

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: reached · appeared · spoke · #462: strange · force · character · taking

Anagrams

Noun

strange (uncountable)

  1. (slang, uncountable) ****

Esperanto

Adverb

strange

  1. strangely

Old English

Pronunciation

Adjective

strange

  1. Inflected form of strang