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Webster 1913 Edition


Put

Put

,
Noun.
[See
Pit
.]
A pit.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.

Put

,
obs.
3d p
ers.
s
ing.
p
res.
of
Put
, contracted from putteth.
Chaucer.

Put

,
Noun.
[Cf. W.
pwt
any short thing,
pwt o ddyn
a squab of a person,
pwtog
a short, thick woman.]
A rustic; a clown; an awkward or uncouth person.
Queer country
puts
extol Queen Bess’s reign.
Bramston.
What droll
puts
the citizens seem in it all.
F. Harrison.

Put

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Put
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Putting
.]
[AS.
potian
to thrust: cf. Dan.
putte
to put, to put into, Fries.
putje
; perh. akin to W.
pwtio
to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael.
put
to push, thrust, and E.
potter
, v. i.]
1.
To move in any direction; to impel; to thrust; to push; – nearly obsolete, except with adverbs, as with by (to put by = to thrust aside; to divert); or with forth (to put forth = to thrust out).
His chief designs are . . . to
put
thee by from thy spiritual employment.
Jer. Taylor.
2.
To bring to a position or place; to place; to lay; to set; figuratively, to cause to be or exist in a specified relation, condition, or the like; to bring to a stated mental or moral condition;
as, to
put
one in fear; to
put
a theory in practice; to
put
an enemy to fight.
This present dignity,
In which that I have
put
you.
Chaucer.
I will
put
enmity between thee and the woman.
Gen. iii. 15.
He
put
no trust in his servants.
Job iv. 18.
When God into the hands of their deliverer
Puts
invincible might.
Milton.
In the mean time other measures were
put
in operation.
Sparks.
3.
To attach or attribute; to assign;
as, to
put
a wrong construction on an act or expression
.
4.
To lay down; to give up; to surrender.
[Obs.]
No man hath more love than this, that a man
put
his life for his friends.
Wyclif (John xv. 13).
5.
To set before one for judgment, acceptance, or rejection; to bring to the attention; to offer; to state; to express; figuratively, to assume; to suppose; – formerly sometimes followed by that introducing a proposition;
as, to
put
a question; to
put
a case.
Let us now
put
that ye have leave.
Chaucer.
Put
the perception and you
put
the mind.
Berkeley.
These verses, originally Greek, were
put
in Latin.
Milton.
All this is ingeniously and ably
put
.
Hare.
6.
To incite; to entice; to urge; to constrain; to oblige.
These wretches
put
us upon all mischief.
Swift.
Put
me not use the carnal weapon in my own defense.
Sir W. Scott.
Thank him who
puts
me, loath, to this revenge.
Milton.
7.
To throw or cast with a pushing motion “overhand,” the hand being raised from the shoulder; a practice in athletics;
as, to
put
the shot or weight
.
8.
(Mining)
To convey coal in the mine, as from the working to the tramway.
Raymond.
Put case
,
formerly, an elliptical expression for, put or suppose the case to be.
Put case
that the soul after departure from the body may live.
Bp. Hall.
To put about
(Naut.)
,
to turn, or change the course of, as a ship.
To put away
.
(a)
To renounce; to discard; to expel.
(b)
To divorce
. –
To put back
.
(a)
To push or thrust backwards; hence, to hinder; to delay.
(b)
To refuse; to deny
.
Coming from thee, I could not
put
him
back
.
Shakespeare
(c)
To set, as the hands of a clock, to an earlier hour.
(d)
To restore to the original place; to replace
. –
To put by
.
(a)
To turn, set, or thrust, aside.
“Smiling put the question by.”
Tennyson.
(b)
To lay aside; to keep; to sore up; as, to put by money.
To put down
.
(a)
To lay down; to deposit; to set down.
(b)
To lower; to diminish; as, to put down prices
.
(c)
To deprive of position or power; to put a stop to; to suppress; to abolish; to confute; as, to put down rebellion or traitors
.
Mark, how a plain tale shall
put
you
down
.
Shakespeare
Sugar hath
put down
the use of honey.
Bacon.
(d)
To subscribe; as, to put down one's name.
To put forth
.
(a)
To thrust out; to extend, as the hand; to cause to come or push out; as, a tree puts forth leaves.
(b)
To make manifest; to develop; also, to bring into action; to exert; as, to put forth strength
.
(c)
To propose, as a question, a riddle, and the like
.
(d)
To publish, as a book
. –
To put forward
.
(a)
To advance to a position of prominence or responsibility; to promote.
(b)
To cause to make progress; to aid.
(c)
To set, as the hands of a clock, to a later hour.
To put in
.
(a)
To introduce among others; to insert; sometimes, to introduce with difficulty;
as,
to put in
a word while others are discoursing
.
(b)
(Naut.)
To conduct into a harbor, as a ship
.
(c)
(Law)
To place in due form before a court; to place among the records of a court
.
Burrill.
(d)
(Med.)
To restore, as a dislocated part, to its place.
To put off
.
(a)
To lay aside; to discard;
as,
to put off
a robe;
to put off
mortality
.
Put off thy shoes from off thy feet.”
Ex. iii. 5.
(b)
To turn aside; to elude; to disappoint; to frustrate; to baffle.
I hoped for a demonstration, but Themistius hoped
to put
me
off
with an harangue.
Boyle.
We might
put
him
off
with this answer.
Bentley.
(c)
To delay; to defer; to postpone; as, to put off repentance.
(d)
To get rid of; to dispose of; especially, to pass fraudulently;
as,
to put off
a counterfeit note, or an ingenious theory
.
(e)
To push from land;
as,
to put off
a boat
. –
To put on
or
To put upon
.
(a)
To invest one's self with, as clothes; to assume.
“Mercury . . . put on the shape of a man.”
L'Estrange.
(b)
To impute (something) to; to charge upon; as, to put blame on or upon another.
(c)
To advance; to promote
.
[Obs.]
“This came handsomely to put on the peace.”
Bacon.
(d)
To impose; to inflict.
“That which thou puttest on me, will I bear.”
2 Kings xviii. 14.
(e)
To apply;
as,
to put on
workmen;
to put on
steam
.
(f)
To deceive; to trick.
“The stork found he was put upon.”
L'Estrange.
(g)
To place upon, as a means or condition; as, he put him upon bread and water.
“This caution will put them upon considering.”
Locke.
(h)
(Law)
To rest upon; to submit to; as, a defendant puts himself on or upon the country.
Burrill.
To put out
.
(a)
To eject;
as,
to put out
and intruder
.
(b)
To put forth; to shoot, as a bud, or sprout
.
(c)
To extinguish;
as,
to put out
a candle, light, or fire
.
(d)
To place at interest; to loan;
as,
to put out
funds
.
(e)
To provoke, as by insult; to displease; to vex; as, he was put out by my reply
.
[Colloq.]
(f)
To protrude; to stretch forth;
as,
to put out
the hand
.
(g)
To publish; to make public;
as,
to put out
a pamphlet
.
(h)
To confuse; to disconcert; to interrupt;
as,
to put
one
out
in reading or speaking
.
(i)
(Law)
To open;
as,
to put out
lights, that is, to open or cut windows
.
Burrill.
(j)
(Med.)
To place out of joint; to dislocate; as, to put out the ankle.
(k)
To cause to cease playing, or to prevent from playing longer in a certain inning, as in base ball
.
(l)
to engage in sexual intercourse; – used of women;
as, she's got a great bod, but she doesn't
put out
.
[Vulgar slang]
To put over
.
(a)
To place (some one) in authority over;
as,
to put
a general
over
a division of an army
.
(b)
To refer
.
For the certain knowledge of that truth
I
put
you
o'er
to heaven and to my mother.
Shakespeare
(c)
To defer; to postpone; as, the court put over the cause to the next term.
(d)
To transfer (a person or thing) across;
as,
to put
one
over
the river
. –
To put the hand to
or
To put the hand unto
.
(a)
To take hold of, as of an instrument of labor; as, to put the hand to the plow; hence, to engage in (any task or affair);
as,
to put
one's
hand to
the work
.
(b)
To take or seize, as in theft.
“He hath not put his hand unto his neighbor's goods.”
Ex. xxii. 11.
To put through
,
to cause to go through all conditions or stages of a progress; hence, to push to completion; to accomplish;
as, he
put through
a measure of legislation; he
put through
a railroad enterprise
.
[U.S.]
To put to
.
(a)
To add; to unite;
as,
to put
one sum
to
another
.
(b)
To refer to; to expose;
as,
to put
the safety of the state
to
hazard
. “That dares not put it to the touch.”
Montrose.
(c)
To attach (something) to; to harness beasts to.
Dickens.
To put to a stand
,
to stop; to arrest by obstacles or difficulties.
To put to bed
.
(a)
To undress and place in bed, as a child.
(b)
To deliver in, or to make ready for, childbirth
. –
To put to death
,
to kill.
To put together
,
to attach; to aggregate; to unite in one.
To put this and that
(or
two and two
)
together
,
to draw an inference; to form a correct conclusion.
To put to it
,
to distress; to press hard; to perplex; to give difficulty to.
“O gentle lady, do not put me to 't.”
Shak.
To put to rights
,
to arrange in proper order; to settle or compose rightly.
To put to the sword
,
to kill with the sword; to slay.
To put to trial
, or
on trial
,
to bring to a test; to try.
To put trust in
,
to confide in; to repose confidence in.
To put up
.
(a)
To pass unavenged; to overlook; not to punish or resent; to put up with;
as,
to put up
indignities
.
[Obs.]
“Such national injuries are not to be put up.”
Addison.
(b)
To send forth or upward; as, to put up goods for sale.
(d)
To start from a cover, as game
. “She has been frightened; she has been put up.”
C. Kingsley.
(e)
To hoard.
“Himself never put up any of the rent.”
Spelman.
(f)
To lay side or preserve; to pack away; to store; to pickle;
as, to
put up
pork, beef, or fish
.
(g)
To place out of sight, or away; to put in its proper place;
as,
put up
that letter
.
Shak.
(h)
To incite; to instigate; – followed by to;
as, he
put
the lad
up
to mischief
.
(i)
To raise; to erect; to build; as, to put up a tent, or a house
.
(j)
To lodge; to entertain;
as,
to put up
travelers
. –
To put up a job
,
to arrange a plot.
[Slang]
Syn. – To place; set; lay; cause; produce; propose; state.
Put
,
Lay
,
Place
,
Set
. These words agree in the idea of fixing the position of some object, and are often used interchangeably. To put is the least definite, denoting merely to move to a place. To place has more particular reference to the precise location, as to put with care in a certain or proper place. To set or to lay may be used when there is special reference to the position of the object.

Put

(put; often pŭt in def. 3)
,
Verb.
I.
1.
To go or move;
as, when the air first
puts
up
.
[Obs.]
Bacon.
2.
To steer; to direct one's course; to go.
His fury thus appeased, he
puts
to land.
Dryden.
3.
To play a card or a hand in the game called put.
To put about
(Naut.)
,
to change direction; to tack.
To put back
(Naut.)
,
to turn back; to return.
“The French . . . had put back to Toulon.”
Southey.
To put forth
.
(a)
To shoot, bud, or germinate
. “Take earth from under walls where nettles put forth.”
Bacon.
(b)
To leave a port or haven, as a ship.
Shak.
To put in
(Naut.)
,
to enter a harbor; to sail into port.
To put in for
.
(a)
To make a request or claim; as, to put in for a share of profits
.
(b)
To go into covert; – said of a bird escaping from a hawk
.
(c)
To offer one's self; to stand as a candidate for.
Locke.
To put off
,
to go away; to depart; esp., to leave land, as a ship; to move from the shore.
To put on
,
to hasten motion; to drive vehemently.
To put over
(Naut.)
,
to sail over or across.
To put to sea
(Naut.)
,
to set sail; to begin a voyage; to advance into the ocean.
To put up
.
(a)
To take lodgings; to lodge
.
(b)
To offer one's self as a candidate
.
L'Estrange.
To put up to
,
to advance to.
[Obs.]
“With this he put up to my lord.”
Swift.
To put up with
.
(a)
To overlook, or suffer without recompense, punishment, or resentment;
as,
to put up with
an injury or affront
.
(b)
To take without opposition or expressed dissatisfaction; to endure;
as,
to put up with
bad fare
.

Put

,
Noun.
1.
The act of putting; an action; a movement; a thrust; a push;
as, the
put
of a ball
.
“A forced put.”
L'Estrange.
2.
A certain game at cards.
Young.
3.
(Finance)
A privilege which one party buys of another to “put” (deliver) to him a certain amount of stock, grain, etc., at a certain price and date.
[Brokers' Cant]
A
put
and a call may be combined in one instrument, the holder of which may either buy or sell as he chooses at the fixed price.
Johnson's Cyc.

Put

,
Noun.
[OF.
pute
.]
A prostitute.
[Obs.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Put

PUT

,
Verb.
T.
pret. and pp. put. [Gr.a germ, shoot or twig. We find the same word in the L. puto, to prune, that is, to thrust off, also to think or consider, that is, to set in the mind, as we use suppose, L. supono. But we see the English sense more distinctly in the compounds, imputo, to impute, that is, to put to or on; computo, to compute, to put together. The L. posui, from pono, is probably a dialectical orthography of the same root.
1.
To set, lay or place; in a general sense. Thus we say, to put the hand to the face; to put a book on the shelf; to put a horse in the stable; to put fire to the fuel; to put clothes on the body. God planted a garden and there he put Adam.
2.
Put is applicable to state or condition, as well as to place. Put him in a condition to help himself. Put the fortress in a state of defense. The apostles were put in trust with the gospel. We are often put in jeopardy by our own ignorance or rashness. We do not always put the best men in office.
3.
To repose.
How wilt thou--put thy trust on Egypt for chariots?
2 Kings 18.
4.
To push into action.
Thank him who puts me, loth, to this revenge.
5.
To apply; to set to employment.
No man having put his hand to the plow,and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God. Luke 9.
6.
To throw or introduce suddenly. He had no time to put in a word.
7.
To consign to letters.
He made a proclamation--and put it also in writing.
2 Chron 36.
8.
To oblige; to require.
We are put to prove things which can hardly be made plainer.
9.
To incite; to instigate; to urge by influence. The appearance of a formidable enemy put the king on making vigorous preparations for defense.
This put me upon observing the thickness of the glass.
These wretches put us upon all mischief, to feed their lusts and extravagances.
10. To propose; as, to put a question to the witness; to put a case in point.
11. To reach to another. Hab.2.
12. To bring into a state of mind or temper.
Solyman, to put the Rhodians out of all suspicion of invasion--
13. To offer; to advance.
I am ashamed to put a loose indigested play upon the public--
14. To cause.
The natural constitutions of men put a wide difference between them.
To put about, to turn, to change the course; to gibe ship.
To put by, to turn away; to divert.
The design of the evil one is to put thee by from thy spiritual employment.
A fright hath put by an ague fit.
1.
To thrust aside.
Jonathan had died for being so,
Had not just God put by th' unnatural blow.
To put down, to baffle; to repress; to crush; as, to put down a party.
1.
To degrade; to deprive of authority, power or place.
2.
To bring into disuse.
Sugar hath put down the use of honey.
3.
To confute; to silence.
Mark now how a plain tale shall put you down.
To put forth, to propose; to offer to notice.
Sampson said, I will now put forth a riddle to you. Judges 14.
1.
To extend; to reach; as, to put forth the hand.
2.
To shoot out; to send out, as a sprout; as, to put forth leaves.
3.
To exert; to bring into action; as, to put forth strength.
4.
To publish, as a book.
To put in, to introduce among others; as, to put in a word while others are discoursing.
1.
To insert; as, to put in a passage or clause; to put in a cion.
2.
To conduct into a harbor.
To put in fear, to affright; to make fearful.
To put in mind, to remind; to call to remembrance.
To put in practice, to use; to exercise; as, to put in practice the maxims of the wise man.
To put into another's hands, to trust; to commit to the care of.
To put off, to divest; to lay aside; as, to put off a robe; to put off mortality or the mortal body; to put off haughty airs.
1.
To turn aside from a purpose or demand; to defeat or delay by artifice.
I hoped for a demonstration, but Themistices hopes to put me off with a harangue.
This is n unreasonable demand, and we might put him off with this answer.
2.
To delay; to defer; to postpone. How generally do men put off the care of their salvation to future opportunities!
3.
To pass fallaciously; to cause to be circulated or received; as, to put off upon the world some plausible reports or ingenious theory.
4.
To discard.
The clothiers all put off
The spinsters, carders, fullers, weavers--
5.
To recommend; to vend; to obtrude.
6.
To vend; to sell.
7.
To pass into other hands; as, to put off a counterfeit coin or note.
8.
To push from land; as, to put off the boat.
To put on or upon, to impute; to charge; as, to put one's own crime or blame on another.
1.
To invest with, as clothes or covering; as, to put on a cloke.
2.
To assume; as, to put on a grave countenance; to put on a counterfeit appearance.
Mercury--put on the shape of a man.
3.
To forward; to promote.
This came handsomely to put on the peace.
4.
To impose; to inflict.
That which thou puttest on me, I will bear. 2 Kings 18.
To be put upon, to be imposed on; to be deceived; used chiefly in the passive form.put over, to refer; to send.
For the certain knowledge of that truth,
I put you o'er to heaven and to my mother.
1.
To defer; to postpone. The court put over the cause to the next term.
To put out, to place at interest; to lend at use. Money put out at compound interest, nearly doubles in eleven years.
1.
To extinguish; as, to put out a candle, lamp or fire; to put out the remains of affection.
2.
To send; to emit; to shoot; as a bud or sprout; as, to put out leaves.
3.
To extend; to reach out; to protrude; as, to put out the hand.
4.
To drive out; to expel; to dismiss.
When I am put out of the stewardship. Luke 16.
5.
To publish; to make public; as, to put out a pamphlet. [Not vulgar.]
6.
To confuse; to disconcert; to interrupt; as, to put one out in reading or speaking.
To put out the eyes, to destroy the power of sight; to render blind.
To put to, to add; to unite; as, to put one sum to another.
1.
To refer to; to expose; as, to put the fate of the army or nation to a battle; to put the safety of the state to hazard.
2.
To punish by; to distress by; as, to put a man to the rack or torture.
To put to it, to distress; to press hard; to perplex; to give difficulty to.
O gentle lady, do not put me to 't.
To be put to it, in the passive form, to have difficulty.
I shall be hard put to it to bring myself off.
To put the hand to, to apply; to take hold; to begin; to undertake; as, to put the hand to the plow. See Deut.12.7.
1.
To take by theft or wrong; to embezzle.
Then shall an oath of the Lord be between them both, that he hath not put his hand to his neighbor's goods. Ex.22.
To put to the sword, to kill; to slay.
To put to death, to kill.
To put to a stand, to stop; to arrest by obstacles or difficulties.
To put to trial, or on trial, to bring before a court and jury for examination and decision.
1.
To bring to a test; to try.
To put together, to unite in a sum, mass or compound; to add; as, to put two sums together; put together the ingredients.
1.
To unite; to connect. Put the two chains together.
2.
To place in company or in one society.
To put trust in, to confide in; to repose confidence in.
To put up, to pass unavenged; to overlook; not to punish or resent; as, to put up injuries; to put up indignities.
Such national injuries are not to be put up, but when the offender is below resentment.
[I have never heard this phrase used in America. We always say, to put up with; we cannot put up with such injuries.]
1.
To send forth or shoot up, as plants; as, to put up mushrooms.
2.
To expose; to offer publicly; as, to put up goods to sale or auction.
3.
To start from a cover.
4.
To hoard.
Himself never put up any of the rent.
5.
To reposit for preservation; as, to put up apples for winter.
6.
To pack; to reposit in casks with salt for preservation; as, to put up pork, beef or fish.
7.
To hide or lay aside. Put up that letter.
8.
To put in a trunk or box; to pack; as, to put up clothing for a journey.

PUT

,
Verb.
I.
To go or move; as, when the air first puts up.
1.
To steer.
His fury thus appeas'd, he puts to land.
2.
To shoot; to germinate.
The sap puts downward.
To put forth, to shoot; to bud; to germinate.
Take earth from under walls where nettles put forth.
1.
To leave a port or haven.
To put in, to enter a harbor; to sail into port.
1.
To offer a claim. A puts in for a share of profits.
To put in for, to offer one's self; to stand as a candidate for.
To put off, to leave land.
To put on, to urge motion; to drive vehemently.
To put over, to sail over or across.
To put to sea, to set sail; to begin a voyage; to advance into the ocean.
To put up, to take lodgings; to lodge. We put up at the Golden Ball.
1.
To offer one's self as a candidate.
To put up to, to advance to. [Little used.]
To put up with, to overlook or suffer without recompense, punishment or resentment; as, to put up with an injury or affront.
1.
To take without opposition or dissatisfaction; as, to put up with bad fare.
This verb, in all its uses, retains its primary sense, to set, throw, thrust, send, &c.; but its signification is modified in a great variety of ways, by other words standing in connection with it.

PUT

,
Noun.
An action of distress; as a forced put.
1.
A game at cards.

PUT

,
Noun.
A rustic; a clown.

PUT

,
Noun.
A strumpet; a prostitute.
Put case, for put the case, suppose the case to be so; a vulgar or at least inelegant phrase.

Definition 2022


put

put

See also: PUT, pût, pūt, and puț

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: po͝ot, IPA(key): /pʊt/
  • Rhymes: -ʊt

Verb

put (third-person singular simple present puts, present participle putting, simple past put, past participle put or (UK dialectal) putten)

  1. To place something somewhere.
    She put her books on the table.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 8, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Philander went into the next room [] and came back with a salt mackerel that dripped brine like a rainstorm. Then he put the coffee pot on the stove and rummaged out a loaf of dry bread and some hardtack.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess:
      No. I only opened the door a foot and put my head in. The street lamps shine into that room. I could see him. He was all right. Sleeping like a great grampus. Poor, poor chap.’
  2. To bring or set into a certain relation, state or condition.
    Put your house in order!
    He is putting all his energy into this one task.
    She tends to put herself in dangerous situations.
  3. (finance) To exercise a put option.
    He got out of his Procter and Gamble bet by putting his shares at 80.
  4. To express something in a certain manner.
    When you put it that way, I guess I can see your point.
    • Hare
      All this is ingeniously and ably put.
  5. (athletics) To throw a heavy iron ball, as a sport. (See shot put. Do not confuse with putt.)
  6. To steer; to direct one's course; to go.
  7. To play a card or a hand in the game called put.
  8. To attach or attribute; to assign.
    to put a wrong construction on an act or expression
  9. (obsolete) To lay down; to give up; to surrender.
    • Wyclif Bible, John xv. 13
      No man hath more love than this, that a man put his life for his friends.
  10. To set before one for judgment, acceptance, or rejection; to bring to the attention.
    to put a question; to put a case
    • Berkeley
      Put the perception and you put the mind.
    • Milton
      These verses, originally Greek, were put in Latin.
    • Now if there was one thing that the animals were completely certain of, it was that they did not want Jones back. When it was put to them in this light, they had no more to say.
  11. (obsolete) To incite; to entice; to urge; to constrain; to oblige.
    • Jonathan Swift
      These wretches put us upon all mischief.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      Put me not to use the carnal weapon in my own defence.
    • Milton
      Thank him who puts me, loath, to this revenge.
  12. (mining) To convey coal in the mine, as for example from the working to the tramway.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)
Derived terms
Translations
See also

putten

Noun

put (plural puts)

  1. (business) A right to sell something at a predetermined price.
  2. (finance) A contract to sell a security at a set price on or before a certain date.
    He bought a January '08 put for Procter and Gamble at 80 to hedge his bet.
    • Johnson's Cyc.
      A put and a call may be combined in one instrument, the holder of which may either buy or sell as he chooses at the fixed price.
  3. The act of putting; an action; a movement; a thrust; a push.
    the put of a ball
    • L'Estrange
      The stag's was a forc'd put, and a chance rather than a choice.
  4. An old card game.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Young to this entry?)
See also

Etymology 2

Origin unknown. Perhaps related to Welsh pwt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʌt/

Noun

put (plural puts)

  1. (obsolete) An idiot; a foolish person.
    • Bramston
      Queer country puts extol Queen Bess's reign.
    • F. Harrison
      What droll puts the citizens seem in it all.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, page 244:
      The old put wanted to make a parson of me, but d—n me, thinks I to myself, I'll nick you there, old cull; the devil a smack of your nonsense shall you ever get into me.

Etymology 3

Old French pute.

Noun

put (plural puts)

  1. (obsolete) A prostitute.

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: nothing · God · three · #164: put · once · new · years

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch put.

Noun

put (plural putte)

  1. well; pit

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ut

Verb

put

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of pudir
  2. second-person singular imperative form of pudir

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ʏt
  • IPA(key): /ˈpʏt/

Etymology

From Old Dutch *putti, from Proto-Germanic *putjaz, from Latin puteus.

Noun

put m (plural putten, diminutive putje n)

  1. pit, well

Derived terms

Verb

put

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of putten
  2. imperative of putten

Finnish

Interjection

put

  1. (onomatopoeia) putt, imitating the sound of a low speed internal combustion engine, usually repeated at least twice: put, put.

French

Pronunciation

Verb

put

  1. third-person singular past historic of pouvoir

Kalasha

Noun

put

  1. Alternative spelling of putr

Latvian

Verb

put

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of putēt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of putēt
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of putēt
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of putēt

Lojban

Rafsi

put

  1. rafsi of sputu.

Scottish Gaelic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʰuʰt̪/

Verb

put (past phut, future putaidh, verbal noun putadh, past participle pute)

  1. push, shove
  2. jostle
  3. press

Derived terms

Noun

put m (genitive singular puta, plural putan)

  1. young grouse, pout (Lagopus lagopus)
  2. (nautical) large buoy, float (generally of sheepskin, inflated)
  3. corpulent person; any bulging thing
  4. shovelful, sod, spadeful
  5. (medicine) bruised swelling

Mutation

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
puta phuta
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, ISBN 0 901771 92 9

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *pǫtь, from Proto-Indo-European *ponth₂-.
Cognate with sputnik, from Russian спу́тник (spútnik, fellow traveller).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pûːt/

Noun

pȗt m (Cyrillic spelling пу̑т)

  1. road
    put za Sarajevo — road to Sarajevo
    gd(j)e vodi ovaj put? — where does this road lead?
  2. way
    ovim putem — this way
    ići pravim putem — to go the right way
    vodeni put — waterway
    ići svojim putem — to go one's own way
    stati nekome na put — to stand in somebody's way
    teret je na putu — cargo is on the way
    miči mi se s puta! — get out of my way!
    najkraći put do bolnice — the shortest way to the hospital
    na pola puta do škole — halfway to the school
  3. path
    krčiti put — to clear a path
    put do usp(j)eha — the path to success
  4. trip, journey
    ići na put — to go on a trip
    biti na putu — to be on a trip
    put oko sv(ij)eta — a trip around the world
    poslovni put — a business trip
  5. figurative and idiomatic senses
    sudskim putem — by legal means
    službenim/zvaničnim putem — through official channels
    Ml(ij)ečni put — Milky Way
Declension

Etymology 2

From Proto-Slavic *plъtь.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pût/

Noun

pȕt f (Cyrillic spelling пу̏т)

  1. complexion, skin hue, tan
    sv(ij)etla put — fair complexion/tan
    tamna put — dark complexion/tan
    crna put — black complexion/tan
  2. body as a totality of physical properties and sensitivities
    mlada put — a young body
    gladna put — a hungry body
Declension

Etymology 3

From pȗt (road, path, way).
Cognated with sputnik, from Russian спу́тник (spútnik, fellow traveller).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pûːt/

Preposition

pȗt (Cyrillic spelling пу̑т)

  1. (with genitive) to, towards
    put Sarajeva — towards Sarajevo
    put škole — to school
    vozimo se put sela — we are driving towards the village
    krenuo sam put grada — I went towards the city

Etymology 4

From pȗt (road, path, way).
Cognated with sputnik, from Russian спу́тник (spútnik, fellow traveller).

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pûːt/

Adverb

pȗt (Cyrillic spelling пу̑т)

  1. time (with adjectives, ordinals and demonstratives indicating order in the sequence of actions or occurrences)
    prvi put — the first time, for the first time
    drugi put — the second time, for the second time; another time
    ovaj put — this time
    sljedeći/sledeći put — the next time
    posljednji/poslednji put — the last time
    po stoti put — for the hundredth time
    svaki put — every time

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English foot.

Noun

put

  1. foot