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Webster 1913 Edition


Hut

Hut

,
Noun.
[OE.
hotte
; akin to D.
hut
, G.
hütte
, OHG.
hutta
, Dan.
hytte
, Sw.
hydda
; and F.
hutte
, of G. origin; all akin to E.
hide
to conceal. See
Hude
to conceal.]
A small house, hivel, or cabin; a mean lodge or dwelling; a slightly built or temporary structure.
Death comes on with equal footsteps
To the hall and
hut
Bp. Coxe.
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Hut

HUT

,
Noun.
A small house,hovel or cabin; a mean lodge or dwelling; a cottage. It is particularly applied to log-houses erected for troops in winter.

HUT

,
Verb.
T.
To place in huts, as troops encamped in winter quarters.

HUT

,
Verb.
I.
To take lodgings in huts.
The troops hutted for the winter.

Definition 2021


Hut

Hut

See also: hut, hút, hűt, and huť

German

Noun

Hut m (genitive Huts or Hutes, plural Hüte, diminutive Hütchen n)

  1. hat (see usage notes)
  2. (of mushrooms) head; top
Usage notes
  • German Hut is typically used of hats from a relatively firm fabric (or other material), with or without a brim, but with no peak. In other words, it is not commonly used of hats that could be called a “cap” (Mütze; Kappe) or “bonnet” (Haube).
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old High German huota, from Proto-Indo-European *kadh- (to protect).

Noun

Hut f

  1. guard
    auf der Hut sein - to be on guard
Related terms

hut

hut

See also: Hut, hút, hűt, and huť

English

Noun

hut (plural huts)

  1. a small wooden shed
  2. a primitive dwelling
Translations

Verb

hut (third-person singular simple present huts, present participle hutting, simple past and past participle hutted)

  1. (rare, archaic, transitive) To put into a hut.
    to hut troops in winter quarters
  2. (rare, dated, intransitive) To take shelter in a hut.
    • Washington Irving
      The troops hutted among the heights of Morristown.
    • 1869, O. Ogle, Calendar of the Clarendon State Papers - Page 219:
      Seven boatfuls of Dutch prisoners have been taken to Chelsea College, where they are to hut under the walls.

Etymology 2

A short, sharp sound of command. Compare hey, hup, etc.

Interjection

hut

  1. (American football) Called by the quarterback to prepare the team for a play.

Anagrams


Albanian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Albanian *hut, from Proto-Indo-European *h2eu-t- 'downward(s)'. Cognate to Ancient Greek αὔτως (aútōs, in vain), Gothic 𐌰𐌿𐌸𐍃 (auþs, desert)[1].

Adverb

hut

  1. in vain, vainly
  2. empty, idle
  3. good, appropriate
Related terms

Etymology 2

From the adverb or an onomatopoeia (compare English hoot).

Noun

hut m (indefinite plural hutë, definite singular huti, definite plural hutët)

  1. owl

References

  1. Bardhyl Demiraj, Albanische Etymologien (Amsterdam: Rodopoi, 1997), p.205

Dutch

A Dutch plaggenhut.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦʏt/
  • Rhymes: -ʏt

Noun

hut f (plural hutten, diminutive hutje n)

  1. a small wooden shed, hut.
  2. a primitive dwelling.
  3. a cabin on a boat.
  4. a usually simple recreational lodging, pub, or suchlike for scouting, mountaineering, skiing, and so on.
  5. (archaic or toponym) a roadhouse, inn or pub, sometimes primitive and/or of ill repute.

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *hūdiz, whence also Old English hyd, Old Norse húð

Noun

hūt f

  1. hide
  2. skin

Descendants


Polish

Noun

hut f

  1. genitive plural of huta

Swedish

Interjection

hut

  1. behave! (same as: du ska veta hut! = vet hut! = hut!)

Noun

hut n

  1. decency, good manners, politeness, reason, common sense; only in a few expressions:
    du ska veta hut
    you should behave
    jag ska lära dig veta hut
    I shall teach you some decency
    jag kräver hut och hyfs av mina barn
    I demand good manners and behaviour of my children

Usage notes

  • Very rarely, one sees a definite form hutet

Related terms

See also

  • nu går skam på torra land