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Webster 1913 Edition


Thrust

Thrust

,
Noun.
&
Verb.
Thrist.
[Obs.]
Spenser.

Thrust

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Thrust
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Thrusting
.]
[OE.
[GREEK]rusten
,
[GREEK]risten
,
[GREEK]resten
, Icel.
[GREEK]r[GREEK]st[GREEK]
to thrust, press, force, compel; perhaps akin to E.
threat
.]
1.
To push or drive with force; to drive, force, or impel; to shove;
as, to
thrust
anything with the hand or foot, or with an instrument
.
Into a dungeon
thrust
, to work with slaves.
Milton.
2.
To stab; to pierce; – usually with through.
To thrust away
or
To thrust from
,
to push away; to reject.
To thrust in
,
to push or drive in.
To thrust off
,
to push away.
To thrust on
,
to impel; to urge.
To thrust one’s self in
or
To thrust one's self into
,
to obtrude upon, to intrude, as into a room; to enter (a place) where one is not invited or not welcome.
To thrust out
,
to drive out or away; to expel.
To thrust through
,
to pierce; to stab.
“I am eight times thrust through the doublet.”
Shak.
To thrust together
,
to compress.

Thrust

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To make a push; to attack with a pointed weapon;
as, a fencer
thrusts
at his antagonist
.
2.
To enter by pushing; to squeeze in.
And
thrust
between my father and the god.
Dryden.
3.
To push forward; to come with force; to press on; to intrude.
“Young, old, thrust there in mighty concourse.”
Chapman.
To thrust to
,
to rush upon.
[Obs.]
As doth an eager hound
Thrust to
an hind within some covert glade.
Spenser.

Thrust

,
Noun.
1.
A violent push or driving, as with a pointed weapon moved in the direction of its length, or with the hand or foot, or with any instrument; a stab; – a word much used as a term of fencing.
[Polites] Pyrrhus with his lance pursues,
And often reaches, and his
thrusts
renews.
Dryden.
2.
An attack; an assault.
One
thrust
at your pure, pretended mechanism.
Dr. H. More.
3.
(Mech.)
The force or pressure of one part of a construction against other parts; especially
(Arch.)
, a horizontal or diagonal outward pressure, as of an arch against its abutments, or of rafters against the wall which support them.
4.
(Mining)
The breaking down of the roof of a gallery under its superincumbent weight.
Thrust bearing
(Screw Steamers)
,
a bearing arranged to receive the thrust or endwise pressure of the screw shaft.
Thrust plane
(Geol.)
,
the surface along which dislocation has taken place in the case of a reversed fault.
Syn. – Push; shove; assault; attack.
Thrust
,
Push
,
Shove
. Push and shove usually imply the application of force by a body already in contact with the body to be impelled. Thrust, often, but not always, implies the impulse or application of force by a body which is in motion before it reaches the body to be impelled.

Webster 1828 Edition


Thrust

THRUST

,
Verb.
T.
pret. and pp. thrust. [L. trudo, trusum, trusito.]
1.
To push or drive with force; as, to thrust any thing with the hand or foot, or with an instrument.
Neither shall one thrust another. Joel 2. John 20.
2.
To drive; to force; to impel.
To thrust away or from, to push away; to reject. Acts 7.
To thrust in, to push or drive in.
Thrust in thy sickle and reap. Rev. 14.
To thrust on, to impel; to urge.
To thrust off, to push away.
To thrust through, to pierce; to stab. Num. 25. 2 Sam. 18.
To thrust out, to drive out or away; to expel. Ex.12.
To thrust one's self, to obtrude; to intrude; to enter where one is not invited or not welcome.
To thrust together, to compress.

THRUST

,
Verb.
I.
To make a push; to attack with a pointed weapon; as, a fencer thrusts at his antagonist.
1.
To enter by pushing; to squeeze in.
And thrust between my father and the god.
2.
To intrude.
3.
To push forward; to come with force; to press on.
Young, old, thrust there
In mighty concourse.

THRUST

,
Noun.
A violent push or driving, as with a pointed weapon, or with the hand or foot, or with any instrument; a word much used in fencing.
Polites Pyrrhus with his lance pursues,
And often reaches, and his thrusts renews.
1.
Attack; assault.
There is one thrust at your pure, pretended mechanism.
[Note. Push and shove do not exactly express the sense of thrust. The two former imply the application of force by one body already in contact with the body to be impelled. Thrust on the contrary, often implies the impulse or application of force by a moving body, a body in motion before it reaches the body to be impelled. This distinction does not extend to every case.]

Definition 2022


thrust

thrust

English

Noun

thrust (countable and uncountable, plural thrusts)

  1. (fencing) An attack made by moving the sword parallel to its length and landing with the point.
    Pierre was a master swordsman, and could parry the thrusts of lesser men with barely a thought.
  2. A push, stab, or lunge forward (the act thereof.)
    The cutpurse tried to knock her satchel from her hands, but she avoided his thrust and yelled, "Thief!"
  3. The force generated by propulsion, as in a jet engine.
    Spacecraft are engineering marvels, designed to resist the thrust of liftoff, as well as the reverse pressure of the void.
  4. (figuratively) The primary effort; the goal.
    Ostensibly, the class was about public health in general, but the main thrust was really sex education.

Synonyms

Translations

Verb

thrust (third-person singular simple present thrusts, present participle thrusting, simple past and past participle thrust or thrusted)

  1. (intransitive) To make advance with force.
    We thrust at the enemy with our forces.
  2. (transitive) To force something upon someone.
    I asked her not to thrust the responsibility on me.
  3. (transitive) To push out or extend rapidly or powerfully.
    He thrust his arm into the icy stream and grabbed a wriggling fish, astounding the observers.
    • 1914, Louis Joseph Vance, Nobody, chapter I:
      Three chairs of the steamer type, all maimed, comprised the furniture of this roof-garden, with [] on one of the copings a row of four red clay flower-pots filled with sun-baked dust from which gnarled and rusty stalks thrust themselves up like withered elfin limbs.
  4. (transitive) To push or drive with force; to shove.
    to thrust anything with the hand or foot, or with an instrument
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      Into a dungeon thrust, to work with slaves.
  5. (intransitive) To enter by pushing; to squeeze in.
    • John Dryden (1631-1700)
      And thrust between my father and the god.
  6. To stab; to pierce; usually with through.

Synonyms

Translations

Anagrams