Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


House

House

(hous)
,
Noun.
;
pl.
Houses
(#)
.
[OE.
hous
,
hus
, AS.
h[GREEK]s
; akin to OS. & OFries.
h[GREEK]s
, D.
huis
, OHG.
h[GREEK]s
, G.
haus
, Icel.
h[GREEK]s
, Sw.
hus
, Dan.
huus
, Goth. gud
h[GREEK]s
, house of God, temple; and prob. to E.
hide
to conceal. See
Hide
, and cf.
Hoard
,
Husband
,
Hussy
,
Husting
.]
1.
A structure intended or used as a habitation or shelter for animals of any kind; but especially, a building or edifice for the habitation of man; a dwelling place, a mansion.
Houses
are built to live in; not to look on.
Bacon.
Bees with smoke and doves with noisome stench
Are from their hives and
houses
driven away.
Shakespeare
2.
Household affairs; domestic concerns; particularly in the phrase to keep house. See below.
3.
Those who dwell in the same house; a household.
One that feared God with all his
house
.
Acts x. 2.
4.
A family of ancestors, descendants, and kindred; a race of persons from the same stock; a tribe; especially, a noble family or an illustrious race;
as, the
house
of Austria; the
house
of Hanover; the
house
of Israel.
The last remaining pillar of their
house
,
The one transmitter of their ancient name.
Tennyson.
5.
One of the estates of a kingdom or other government assembled in parliament or legislature; a body of men united in a legislative capacity;
as, the
House
of Lords; the
House
of Commons; the
House
of Representatives; also, a quorum of such a body. See
Congress
, and
Parliament
.
6.
(Com.)
A firm, or commercial establishment.
7.
A public house; an inn; a hotel.
8.
(Astrol.)
A twelfth part of the heavens, as divided by six circles intersecting at the north and south points of the horizon, used by astrologers in noting the positions of the heavenly bodies, and casting horoscopes or nativities. The houses were regarded as fixed in respect to the horizon, and numbered from the one at the eastern horizon, called the ascendant, first house, or house of life, downward, or in the direction of the earth’s revolution, the stars and planets passing through them in the reverse order every twenty-four hours.
9.
A square on a chessboard, regarded as the proper place of a piece.
10.
An audience; an assembly of hearers, as at a lecture, a theater, etc.;
as, a thin or a full
house
.
11.
The body, as the habitation of the soul.
This mortal
house
I'll ruin,
Do Cæsar what he can.
Shakespeare
12.
[With an adj., as narrow, dark, etc.]
The grave.
“The narrow house.”
Bryant.
House is much used adjectively and as the first element of compounds. The sense is usually obvious; as, house cricket, housemaid, house painter, housework.
Syn. – Dwelling; residence; abode. See
Tenement
.

House

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Housed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Housing
.]
[AS.
h[GREEK]sian
.]
1.
To take or put into a house; to shelter under a roof; to cover from the inclemencies of the weather; to protect by covering;
as, to
house
one's family in a comfortable home; to
house
farming utensils; to
house
cattle.
At length have
housed
me in a humble shed.
Young.
House
your choicest carnations, or rather set them under a penthouse.
Evelyn.
2.
To drive to a shelter.
Shak.
3.
To admit to residence; to harbor.
Palladius wished him to
house
all the Helots.
Sir P. Sidney.
4.
To deposit and cover, as in the grave.
Sandys.
5.
(Naut.)
To stow in a safe place; to take down and make safe;
as, to
house
the upper spars
.

House

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To take shelter or lodging; to abide to dwell; to lodge.
You shall not
house
with me.
Shakespeare
2.
(Astrol.)
To have a position in one of the houses. See
House
,
Noun.
, 8.
“Where Saturn houses.”
Dryden.

Webster 1828 Edition


House

HOUSE

,
Noun.
hous. [L. casa; Heb. to put on, to cover.]
1.
In a general sense, a building or shed intended or used as a habitation or shelter for animals of any kind; but appropriately, a building or edifice for the habitation of man; a dwelling place, mansion or abode for any of the human species. It may be of any size and composed of any materials whatever, wood, stone, brick, &c.
2.
An edifice or building appropriated to the worship of God; a temple; a church; as the house of God.
3.
A monastery; a college; as a religious house.
4.
The manner of living; the table.
He keeps a good house, or a miserable house.
5.
In astrology, the station of a planet in the heavens, or the twelfth part of the heavens.
6.
A family of ancestors; descendants and kindred; a race of persons from the same stock; a tribe. It particularly denotes a noble family or an illustrious race; as the house of Austria; the house of Hanover. So in Scripture, the house of Israel,or of Judah.
Two of a house few ages can afford.
7.
One of the estates of a kingdom assembled in parliament or legislature; a body of men united in their legislative capacity, and holding their place by right or by election. Thus we say, the house of lords or peers of Great Britain; the house of commons; the house of representatives. In most of the United States, the legislatures consist of two houses, the senate, and the house of representatives or delegates.
8.
The quorum of a legislative body; the number of representatives assembled who are constitutionally empowered to enact laws. Hence we say, there is a sufficient number of representatives present to form a house.
9.
In Scripture, those who dwell in a house and compose a family; a household.
Cornelius was a devout man, and feared God with all his house. Acts.10.
10. Wealth; estate.
Ye devour widows' houses. Matt.23.
11. The grave; as the house appointed for all living. Job.30.
12. Household affairs; domestic concerns.
Set thy house in order. 2 Kings.20.
13. The body; the residence of the soul in this world; as our earthly house. 2 Cor.5.
14. The church among the Jews.
Moses was faithful in all his house. Heb.3.
15. A place of residence. Egypt is called the house of bondage. Ex.13.
16. A square, or division on a chess board.

HOUSE

,
Verb.
T.
houz. To cover from the inclemencies of the weather; to shelter; to protect by covering; as, to house wood; to house farming utensils; to house cattle.
1.
To admit to residence; to harbor.
Palladius wished him to house all the Helots.
2.
To deposit and cover, as in the grave.
3.
To drive to a shelter.

HOUSE

,
Verb.
I.
houz. To take shelter or lodgings; to keep abode; to reside.
To house with darkness and with death.
1.
To have an astrological station in the heavens.
Where Saturn houses.

Definition 2022


House

House

See also: house

English

Proper noun

House

  1. (US) The House of Representatives, "the House".
  2. More generally, a shortened name for any chamber of a legislature that is named "House of...", especially where the other chamber(s) are not so named (as in Australia or Canada), or where there is no other chamber (as in New Zealand).
  3. A topographic surname for someone residing in a house (as opposed to a hut) or in a religious house.
  4. A village in New Mexico.
  5. An unincorporated community in North Carolina.

Translations

External links


German

Etymology

Borrowing from English house.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -aʊ̯s

Noun

House n (genitive House, no plural)

  1. house music, house

house

house

See also: House

English

Pronunciation

  • (noun):
    • enPR: hous, IPA(key): /haʊs/
    • (Canada) IPA(key): /hʌʊs/
  • (verb):
    • enPR: houz, IPA(key): /haʊz/
    • (Canada) IPA(key): /hʌʊz/
  • Rhymes: -aʊs, -aʊz
  • Homophone: how's (verb)

Noun

The house of a Japanese rice farmer

house (plural houses or (dialectal) housen)

  1. A structure built or serving as an abode of human beings. [from 9thc.]
    This is my house and my family's ancestral home.
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall, The Squire's Daughter, chapterIII:
      The big houses, and there are a good many of them, lie for the most part in what may be called by courtesy the valleys. You catch a glimpse of them sometimes at a little distance from the [railway] line, which seems to have shown some ingenuity in avoiding them, [].
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path  []. It twisted and turned, [] and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights. 'Twas the house I'd seen the roof of from the beach.
  2. The people who live in a house; a household. [from 9thc.]
    • Bible, Acts x.2:
      one that feared God with all his house
  3. A building used for something other than a residence (typically with qualifying word). [from 10thc.]
    The former carriage house had been made over into a guest house.
  4. A place of business; a company or organisation, especially a printing press, a publishing company, or a couturier. [from 10thc.]
    A small publishing house would have a contract with an independent fulfillment house.
  5. A place of public accommodation or entertainment, especially a public house, an inn, a restaurant, a theatre, or a casino; or the management thereof.[from 10thc.]
    One more, sir, then I'll have to stop serving you – rules of the house, I'm afraid.
    The house always wins.
  6. The audience for a live theatrical or similar performance. [from 10thc.]
    After her swan-song, there wasn't a dry eye in the house.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 2, in The Affair at the Novelty Theatre:
      Miss Phyllis Morgan, as the hapless heroine dressed in the shabbiest of clothes, appears in the midst of a gay and giddy throng; she apostrophises all and sundry there, including the villain, and has a magnificent scene which always brings down the house, and nightly adds to her histrionic laurels.
    • 2007 November 6, “When Will the Slump End?”, in Newsweek:
      Those homeowners who bought too much house, or borrowed against inflated values are now going to be liable for their own poor decisions.
  7. (politics) A building where a deliberative assembly meets; whence the assembly itself, particularly a component of a legislature. [from 10thc.]
    The petition was so ridiculous that the house rejected it after minimal debate.
  8. A dynasty; a family with its ancestors and descendants, especially a royal or noble one. [from 10thc.]
    A curse lay upon the House of Atreus.
  9. (figuratively) a place of rest or repose. [from 9thc.]
  10. A grouping of schoolchildren for the purposes of competition in sports and other activities. [from 19thc.]
    I was a member of Spenser house when I was at school.
  11. An animal's shelter or den, or the shell of an animal such as a snail, used for protection. [from 10thc.]
  12. (astrology) One of the twelve divisions of an astrological chart. [from 14thc.]
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, p.313:
      Since there was a limited number of planets, houses and signs of the zodiac, the astrologers tended to reduce human potentialities to a set of fixed types and to postulate only a limited number of possible variations.
  13. (chess, now rare) A square on a chessboard, regarded as the proper place of a piece. [from 16thc.]
  14. (curling) The four concentric circles where points are scored on the ice. [from 19thc.]
  15. Lotto; bingo. [from 20thc.]
  16. (uncountable) A children's game in which the players pretend to be members of a household.
    As the babysitter, Emma always acted as the mother whenever the kids demanded to play house.
Synonyms
  • (establishment): shop
  • (company or organisation): shop
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
External links

Verb

house (third-person singular simple present houses, present participle housing, simple past and past participle housed)

  1. (transitive) To keep within a structure or container.
    The car is housed in the garage.
    • Evelyn
      House your choicest carnations, or rather set them under a penthouse.
  2. (transitive) To admit to residence; to harbor/harbour.
    • Sir Philip Sidney
      Palladius wished him to house all the Helots.
  3. To take shelter or lodging; to abide; to lodge.
    • Shakespeare
      You shall not house with me.
  4. (transitive, astrology) To dwell within one of the twelve astrological houses.
    • Dryden
      Where Saturn houses.
  5. (transitive) To contain or cover mechanical parts.
  6. (obsolete) To drive to a shelter.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  7. (obsolete) To deposit and cover, as in the grave.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sandys to this entry?)
  8. (nautical) To stow in a safe place; to take down and make safe.
    to house the upper spars
Synonyms
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably from The Warehouse, a nightclub in Chicago, Illinois, USA, where the music became popular around 1985.

Noun

house (uncountable)

  1. (music) House music.
    • 1998, Colin Larkin, The Virgin Encyclopedia of Dance Music, London: Virgin Books, ISBN 978-0-7535-0252-5, page 73:
      [] their music is influenced as much by Roxy Music and the Ramones as it is by house and techno pioneers.
    • 2001 March, Philip Sherburne, “Exos, Strength [album review]”, in CMJ New Music Monthly, number 91, Great Neck, N.Y.: College Media, ISSN 1074-6978, page 66:
      And while hard, minimal techno has become increasingly influenced by house and Oval-esque "glitch" stylistics, Exos keeps it old school on Strength, infusing his own style with the force of hard techno purists Surgeon and Oliver Ho.
    • 2006, Mark Jonathan Butler, Unlocking the Groove: Rhythm, Meter, and Musical Design in Electronic Dance Music, Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, ISBN 978-0-253-34662-9, page 45:
      The first genre of American dance music to become popular in the United Kingdom was Chicago house. Although music from Detroit was soon imported as well, it was often treated as subcategory of house, and for many years the most common English term for electronic dance music in general was "house" or "acid house". [] During the formative years of techno and house, the musicians involved interacted in various ways.
Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: love · far · seemed · #182: house · looked · head · called

Arabic

Noun

house (plural houses)

  1. singular بَيْتٌ (baytun); plural بُيُوْتٌ (buyuwtun)
    Example: I live in a small house.
    • Arabic: أَسْكُنُ فِيْ بَيْتٍ صَغِيْرٍ (ʾaskunu fiy baytin ṣaḡiyrin)

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hoʊse/

Noun

house n

  1. gosling

Declension


Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

house m (uncountable)

  1. house music, house

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhou̯se/
  • Hyphenation: hou‧se

Noun

house (uncountable)

  1. (music) house music, house

Declension

Inflection of house (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative house
genitive housen
partitive housea
illative houseen
singular plural
nominative house
accusative nom. house
gen. housen
genitive housen
partitive housea
inessive housessa
elative housesta
illative houseen
adessive housella
ablative houselta
allative houselle
essive housena
translative houseksi
instructive
abessive housetta
comitative

French

Noun

house f (uncountable)

  1. house music, house (genre of music)

Synonyms

Anagrams


Hungarian

Etymology

From English house.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhɒuz]
  • Hyphenation: house

Noun

house (plural house-ok)

  1. (music) house, house music (type of electronic dance music with an uptempo beat and recurring kickdrum)

Declension

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative house house-ok
accusative house-t house-okat
dative house-nak house-oknak
instrumental house-zal house-okkal
causal-final house-ért house-okért
translative house-zá house-okká
terminative house-ig house-okig
essive-formal house-ként house-okként
essive-modal
inessive house-ban house-okban
superessive house-on house-okon
adessive house-nál house-oknál
illative house-ba house-okba
sublative house-ra house-okra
allative house-hoz house-okhoz
elative house-ból house-okból
delative house-ról house-okról
ablative house-tól house-októl
Possessive forms of house
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. house-om house-aim
2nd person sing. house-od house-aid
3rd person sing. house-a house-ai
1st person plural house-unk house-aink
2nd person plural house-otok house-aitok
3rd person plural house-uk house-aik

Derived terms

  • house-parti
  • house-zene

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English house, house music

Noun

house m (indeclinable) (uncountable)

  1. house music, house

Synonyms

  • housemusikk

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

house m

  1. house music, house

Polish

Etymology

English house music

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xaws/

Noun

house m inan

  1. house, house music
Declension

Portuguese

Noun

house m

  1. house music, house

Synonyms


Spanish

Noun

house m (uncountable)

  1. house music, house

Swedish

Noun

house c

  1. house music, house

Declension

Synonyms

  • housemusik, house-musik