Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Trace

Trace

,
Noun.
[F.
trais
. pl. of
trait
. See
Trait
.]
1.
One of two straps, chains, or ropes of a harness, extending from the collar or breastplate to a whiffletree attached to a vehicle or thing to be drawn; a tug.

Trace

,
Noun.
[F.
trace
. See
Trace
,
Verb.
T.
]
1.
A mark left by anything passing; a track; a path; a course; a footprint; a vestige;
as, the
trace
of a carriage or sled; the
trace
of a deer; a sinuous
trace
.
Milton.
2.
(Chem. & Min.)
A very small quantity of an element or compound in a given substance, especially when so small that the amount is not quantitatively determined in an analysis; – hence, in stating an analysis, often contracted to tr.
3.
A mark, impression, or visible appearance of anything left when the thing itself no longer exists; remains; token; vestige.
The shady empire shall retain no
trace

Of war or blood, but in the sylvan chase.
Pope.
4.
(Descriptive Geom. & Persp.)
The intersection of a plane of projection, or an original plane, with a coordinate plane.
5.
(Fort.)
The ground plan of a work or works.
Syn
.
-Vestige; mark; token. See
Vestige
.

Trace

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
traced
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
tracing
.]
[OF.
tracier
, F.
tracer
, from (assumed) LL.
tractiare
, fr.L.
tractus
, p. p. of
trahere
to draw. Cf.
Abstract
,
Attract
,
Contract
,
Portratt
,
Tract
,
Trail
,
Train
,
Treat
. ]
1.
To mark out; to draw or delineate with marks; especially, to copy, as a drawing or engraving, by following the lines and marking them on a sheet superimposed, through which they appear;
as, to
trace
a figure or an outline; a
traced
drawing
.
Some faintly
traced
features or outline of the mother and the child, slowly lading into the twilight of the woods.
Hawthorne.
2.
To follow by some mark that has been left by a person or thing which has preceded; to follow by footsteps, tracks, or tokens.
Cowper.
You may
trace
the deluge quite round the globe.
T. Burnet.
I feel thy power . . . to
trace
the ways
Of highest agents.
Milton.
3.
Hence, to follow the trace or track of.
How all the way the prince on footpace
traced
.
Spenser.
4.
To copy; to imitate.
That servile path thou nobly dost decline,
Of
tracing
word, and line by line.
Denham.
5.
To walk over; to pass through; to traverse.
We do
trace
this alley up and down.
Shakespeare

Trace

,
Verb.
I.
To walk; to go; to travel.
[Obs.]
Not wont on foot with heavy arms to
trace
.
Spenser.

Webster 1828 Edition


Trace

TRACE

,
Noun.
[L. tractus, tracto. See Track, and the verb Trace.]
1.
A mark left by any thing passing; a footstep; a track; a vestige; as the trace of a carriage or sled; the trade of a man or of a deer.
2.
Remains; a mark, impression or visible appearance of any thing left when the thing itself no longer exists. We are told that there are no traces of ancient Babylon now to be seen.
The shady empire shall retain no trace
Of war or blood, but in the sylvan chase.

TRACE

,
Noun.
Traces, in a harness, are the straps, chains or ropes by which a carriage or sleigh is drawn by horses. [Locally these are called tugs.]

TRACE

,
Verb.
T.
[L. tracto, from traho; Eng. to draw, to drag.]
1.
To mark out; to draw or delineate with marks; as, to race a figure with a pencil; to trace the outline of any thing.
2.
To follow by some mark that has been left by something which has preceded; to follow by footsteps or tracks.
You may trace the deluge quite round the globe.
I feel thy power to trace the ways
Of highest agents.
3.
To follow with exactness.
That servile path thou nobly do'st decline,
Of tracing word by word, and line by line.
4.
To walk over.
We do trace this alley up and down.

Definition 2023


Trace

Trace

See also: trace, tracé, and traçe

English

Proper noun

Trace

  1. (colloquial) A short form of the female given name Tracy or Tracey.

trace

trace

See also: Trace, tracé, and traçe

English

Noun

trace (countable and uncountable, plural traces)

  1. An act of tracing.
    Your cell phone company can put a trace on your line.
  2. An enquiry sent out for a missing article, such as a letter or an express package.
  3. A mark left as a sign of passage of a person or animal.
  4. A very small amount.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 7, in The China Governess:
      The highway to the East Coast which ran through the borough of Ebbfield had always been a main road and even now, despite the vast garages, the pylons and the gaily painted factory glasshouses which had sprung up beside it, there still remained an occasional trace of past cultures.
    All of our chocolates may contain traces of nuts.
  5. (electronics) A current-carrying conductive pathway on a printed circuit board.
  6. An informal road or prominent path in an arid area.
  7. One of two straps, chains, or ropes of a harness, extending from the collar or breastplate to a whippletree attached to a vehicle or thing to be drawn; a tug.
  8. (engineering) A connecting bar or rod, pivoted at each end to the end of another piece, for transmitting motion, especially from one plane to another; specifically, such a piece in an organ stop action to transmit motion from the trundle to the lever actuating the stop slider.
  9. (fortification) The ground plan of a work or works.
  10. The intersection of a plane of projection, or an original plane, with a coordinate plane.
  11. (mathematics) The sum of the diagonal elements of a square matrix.
  12. (grammar) An empty category occupying a position in the syntactic structure from which something has been moved, used to explain constructions such as wh-movement and the passive.
Derived terms
Synonyms
  • (mark left as a sign of passage of a person or animal): track, trail
  • (small amount): see also Wikisaurus:modicum.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English tracen, from Old French tracer, trasser (to delineate, score, trace", also, "to follow, pursue), probably a conflation of Medieval Latin *tractiāre (to delineate, score, trace), from Latin trahere (to draw); and Old French traquer (to chase, hunt, pursue), from Old French trac (a track, trace), from Middle Dutch treck, treke (a drawing, draft, delineation, feature, expedition). More at track.

Verb

trace (third-person singular simple present traces, present participle tracing, simple past and past participle traced)

  1. (transitive) To follow the trail of.
    • Milton
      I feel thy power [] to trace the ways / Of highest agents.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowper to this entry?)
  2. To follow the history of.
    • T. Burnet
      You may trace the deluge quite round the globe.
    • 2011 July 19, Ella Davies, “Sticks insects survive one million years without sex”, in BBC:
      They traced the ancient lineages of two species to reveal the insects' lengthy history of asexual reproduction.
  3. (transitive) To draw or sketch lightly or with care.
    He carefully traced the outlines of the old building before him.
  4. (transitive) To copy onto a sheet of paper superimposed over the original, by drawing over its lines.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To copy; to imitate.
    • Denham
      That servile path thou nobly dost decline, / Of tracing word, and line by line.
  6. (intransitive, obsolete) To walk; to go; to travel.
    • Spenser
      Not wont on foot with heavy arms to trace.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To walk over; to pass through; to traverse.
    • Shakespeare
      We do trace this alley up and down.
  8. (computing, transitive) To follow the execution of the program by making it to stop after every instruction, or by making it to print a message after every step.
Translations
Related terms

Anagrams


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʁas/
  • Rhymes: -as

Noun

trace f (plural traces)

  1. trace
  2. track
  3. (mathematics) trace

Verb

trace

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tracer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of tracer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of tracer
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of tracer
  5. second-person singular imperative of tracer

Anagrams


Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /traˈt͡ʃe/, [t̪͡r̺aː.t͡ʃe]
  • Hyphenation: trà‧ce

Etymology 1

From Latin thrāx.

Adjective

trace m, f (masculine and feminine plural traci)

  1. (literary) Thracian

Noun

trace m (plural traci)

  1. (historical) A person from or an inhabitant of Thrace.
  2. The Thracian language.

Synonyms

Etymology 2

From Latin thraex.

Noun

trace m (plural traci)

  1. (historical, Ancient Rome) A gladiator bearing Thracian equipment.

Related terms

Anagrams


Old French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tra.sə/

Noun

trace f (oblique plural traces, nominative singular trace, nominative plural traces)

  1. trace (markings showing where one has been)

Descendants


Spanish

Verb

trace

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of trazar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of trazar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of trazar.