Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Pine

Pine

,
Noun.
[AS.
pīn
, L.
poena
penalty. See
Pain
.]
Woe; torment; pain.
[Obs.]
Pyne of hell.”
Chaucer.

Pine

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Pined
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Pining
.]
[AS.
pīnan
to torment, fr.
pīn
torment. See 1st
Pine
,
Pain
,
Noun.
&
Verb.
]
1.
To inflict pain upon; to torment; to torture; to afflict.
[Obs.]
Chaucer. Shak.
That people that
pyned
him to death.
Piers Plowman.
One is
pined
in prison, another tortured on the rack.
Bp. Hall.
2.
To grieve or mourn for.
[R.]
Milton.

Pine

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To suffer; to be afflicted.
[Obs.]
2.
To languish; to lose flesh or wear away, under any distress or anexiety of mind; to droop; – often used with away.
“The roses wither and the lilies pine.”
Tickell.
3.
To languish with desire; to waste away with longing for something; – usually followed by for.
For whom, and not for Tybalt, Juliet
pined
.
Shakespeare
Syn. – To languish; droop; flag; wither; decay.

Pine

,
Noun.
[AS.
pīn
, L.
pinus
.]
1.
(Bot.)
Any tree of the coniferous genus
Pinus
. See
Pinus
.
☞ There are about twenty-eight species in the
United States
, of which the
white pine
(
Pinus Strobus
), the
Georgia pine
(
Pinus australis
), the
red pine
(
Pinus resinosa
), and the great West Coast
sugar pine
(
Pinus Lambertiana
) are among the most valuable. The
Scotch pine
or
fir
, also called
Norway
or
Riga pine
(
Pinus sylvestris
), is the only British species. The
nut pine
is any pine tree, or species of pine, which bears large edible seeds. See
Pinon
.
The spruces, firs, larches, and true cedars, though formerly considered pines, are now commonly assigned to other genera.
2.
The wood of the pine tree.
3.
A pineapple.
Ground pine
.
(Bot.)
See under
Ground
.
Norfolk Island pine
(Bot.)
,
a beautiful coniferous tree, the
Araucaria excelsa
.
Pine barren
,
a tract of infertile land which is covered with pines.
[Southern U.S.]
Pine borer
(Zool.)
,
any beetle whose larvæ bore into pine trees.
Pine finch
.
(Zool.)
See
Pinefinch
, in the Vocabulary.
Pine grosbeak
(Zool.)
,
a large grosbeak (
Pinicola enucleator
), which inhabits the northern parts of both hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with red.
Pine lizard
(Zool.)
,
a small, very active, mottled gray lizard (
Sceloporus undulatus
), native of the Middle States; – called also
swift
,
brown scorpion
, and
alligator
.
Pine marten
.
(Zool.)
(a)
A European weasel (
Mustela martes
), called also
sweet marten
, and
yellow-breasted marten
.
(b)
The American sable. See
Sable
.
Pine moth
(Zool.)
,
any one of several species of small tortricid moths of the genus
Retinia
, whose larvæ burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often doing great damage.
Pine mouse
(Zool.)
,
an American wild mouse (
Arvicola pinetorum
), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine forests.
Pine needle
(Bot.)
,
one of the slender needle-shaped leaves of a pine tree. See
Pinus
.
Pine-needle wool
.
See
Pine wool
(below).
Pine oil
,
an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors.
Pine snake
(Zool.)
,
a large harmless North American snake (
Pituophis melanoleucus
). It is whitish, covered with brown blotches having black margins. Called also
bull snake
. The Western pine snake (
Pituophis Sayi
) is chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange.
Pine tree
(Bot.)
,
a tree of the genus
Pinus
; pine.
Pine-tree money
,
money coined in
Massachusetts
in the seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a figure of a pine tree. The most noted variety is the
pine tree shilling
.
Pine weevil
(Zool.)
,
any one of numerous species of weevils whose larvæ bore in the wood of pine trees. Several species are known in both
Europe
and
America
, belonging to the genera
Pissodes
,
Hylobius
, etc.
Pine wool
,
a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the
Southern United States
, and has many uses in the economic arts; – called also
pine-needle wool
, and
pine-wood wool
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Pine

PINE

,
Noun.
[L. pinus.] A tree of the genus Pinus, of many species, some of which furnish timber of the most valuable kind. The species which usually bear this name in the United States, are the white pine, Pinus strobus,the prince of our forests; the yellow pine, Pinus resinosa; and the pitch pine, Pinus rigida. The other species of this genus are called by other names, a fir,hemlock, larch, spruce, &c.

PINE

, v.i.
1.
To languish; to lose flesh or wear away under any distress of anxiety of mind; to grow lean; followed sometimes by away.
Ye shall not mourn nor weep, but ye shall pine away for your iniquities. Ezek.24.
2.
To languish with desire; to waste away with longing for something; usually followed by for.
Unknowing that she pin'd for your return.

PINE

,
Verb.
T.
To wear out; to make to languish.
Where shivering cold and sickness pines the clime.
Beroe pined with pain.
1.
To grieve for; to bemoan in silence.
Abashed the devil stood--
Virtue in her own shape how lovely, saw,
And pined his loss.
[In the transitive sense, this verb is now seldom used, and this use is improper, except by ellipsis.]

PINE

,
Noun.
Woe; want; penury; misery.
[This is obsolete. See Pain.]

Definition 2021


pine

pine

See also: piné

English

Noun

pine (countable and uncountable, plural pines)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Any coniferous tree of the genus Pinus.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, in The China Governess:
      Sepia Delft tiles surrounded the fireplace, their crudely drawn Biblical scenes in faded cyclamen blending with the pinkish pine, while above them, instead of a mantelshelf, there was an archway high enough to form a balcony with slender balusters and a tapestry-hung wall behind.
    The northern slopes were covered mainly in pine.
  2. (countable) Any tree (usually coniferous) which resembles a member of this genus in some respect.
  3. (uncountable) The wood of this tree.
  4. (archaic except South Africa) A pineapple.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English pinian (torment), from *pine (pain), possibly from Latin poena (punishment), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty, fine, bloodmoney). Cognate to pain.

Entered Germanic with Christianity; cognate to Middle Dutch pinen, Old High German pinon, Old Norse pina.[1]

Noun

pine (plural pines)

  1. (archaic) A painful longing.
Translations

Verb

pine (third-person singular simple present pines, present participle pining, simple past and past participle pined)

  1. To feel irritated; to reflect on a problem. ; to think something over.
  2. To languish; to lose flesh or wear away through distress; to droop.
    • Tickell
      The roses wither and the lilies pine.
  3. (intransitive) To long, to yearn so much that it causes suffering.
    Laura was pining for Bill all the time he was gone.
    • 1855, John Sullivan Dwight (translator), “Oh Holy Night”, as printed in 1871, Adolphe-Charles Adam (music), “Cantique de Noël”, G. Schirmer (New York), originally by Placide Cappeau de Roquemaure, 1847
      Long lay the world in sin and error pining / Till He appear’d and the soul felt its worth
    • 1994, Walter Dean Myers, The Glory Field, ISBN 978054505575, page 29:
      The way the story went was that the man's foot healed up all right but that he just pined away.
  4. (transitive) To grieve or mourn for.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)
  5. (transitive) To inflict pain upon; to torment; to torture; to afflict.
    • Bishop Hall
      One is pined in prison, another tortured on the rack.
Translations

References

  1. pine” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Anagrams


Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /piːnə/, [ˈpʰiːnə], [ˈpʰiːn̩]

Etymology 1

From Old Saxon pīna (late Old Norse pina), from Medieval Latin pēna (punishment), from Latin poena, from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty, fine, bloodmoney).

Noun

pine c (singular definite pinen, plural indefinite piner)

  1. torment
  2. (in compounds) ache
Inflection

Etymology 2

Derived from pine (torment). Compare Old Norse pína and Middle Low German pīnen.

Verb

pine (imperative pin, infinitive at pine, present tense piner, past tense pinte, perfect tense er/har pint)

  1. torment
  2. torture
Synonyms

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pin/

Noun

pine f (plural pines)

  1. (slang) nob, ****

Verb

pine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of piner
  2. third-person singular present indicative of piner
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of piner
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of piner
  5. second-person singular imperative of piner

Italian

Noun

pine f

  1. plural of pina

Anagrams


Latin

Noun

pīne

  1. vocative singular of pīnus

Maori

Etymology

Probably English pin

Noun

pine

  1. pin, tack, brooch

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

pine (present tense piner; past tense pinte; past participle pint)

  1. to torment, to torture

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

pine (present tense piner, past tense pinte, past participle pint, passive infinitive pinast, present participle pinande, imperative pin)

  1. to torment, to torture

Portuguese

Verb

pine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of pinar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of pinar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of pinar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of pinar

West Frisian

Noun

pine ?

  1. pain, ache