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Webster 1913 Edition


Pain

Pain

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Pained
(pānd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Paining
.]
[OE.
peinen
, OF.
pener
, F.
peiner
to fatigue. See
Pain
,
Noun.
]
1.
To inflict suffering upon as a penalty; to punish.
[Obs.]
Wyclif (Acts xxii. 5).
2.
To put to bodily uneasiness or anguish; to afflict with uneasy sensations of any degree of intensity; to torment; to torture;
as, his dinner or his wound
pained
him; his stomach
pained
him.
Excess of cold, as well as heat,
pains
us.
Locke
3.
To render uneasy in mind; to disquiet; to distress; to grieve;
as, a child’s faults
pain
his parents
.
I am
pained
at my very heart.
Jer. iv. 19.
To pain one's self
,
to exert or trouble one's self; to take pains; to be solicitous.
[Obs.]
“She pained her to do all that she might.”
Chaucer.
Syn. – To disquiet; trouble; afflict; grieve; aggrieve; distress; agonize; torment; torture.

Webster 1828 Edition


Pain

PAIN

,
Noun.
[L. paena; Gr. penalty, and pain, labor.]
1.
An uneasy sensation in animal bodies, of any degree from slight uneasiness to extreme distress or torture, proceeding from pressure, tension or spasm, separation of parts by violence, or any derangement of functions. Thus violent pressure or stretching of a limb gives pain; inflammation produces pain; wounds, bruises and incisions give pain.
2.
Labor; work; toil; laborious effort. In this sense, the plural only is used; as, to take pains; to be at the pains.
High without taking pains to rise.
The same with pains we gain, but lose with ease.
3.
Labor; toilsome effort; task; in the singular. [Not now used.]
4.
Uneasiness of mind; disquietude; anxiety; solicitude for the future; grief, sorrow for the past. We suffer pain when we fear or expect evil; we feel pain at the loss of friends or property.
5.
The throws or distress of travail or childbirth.
She bowed herself and travailed, for her pains came upon her. 1 Sam.4.
6.
Penalty; punishment suffered or denounced; suffering or evil inflicted as a punishment for a crime, or annexed to the commission of a crime.
None shall presume to fly under pain of death.
Interpose, on pain of my displeasure.

PAIN

, v.t.
1.
To make uneasy or to disquiet; to cause uneasy sensations in the body, of any degree of intensity; to make simply uneasy, or to distress, to torment. The pressure of fetters may pain a limb; the rack pains the body.
2.
To afflict; to render uneasy in mind; to disquiet; to distress. We are pained at the death of a friend; grief pains the heart; we are often pained with fear or solicitude.
I am pained at my very heart. Jer.4.
3.
Reciprocally, to pain one's self, to labor; to make toilsome efforts. [Little used.]

Definition 2022


Pain

Pain

See also: pain, päin, and -päin

English

Proper noun

Pain

  1. An English surname, variant of Paine.

Anagrams

pain

pain

See also: Pain, päin, and -päin

English

Noun

pain (countable and uncountable, plural pains)

  1. (countable and uncountable) An ache or bodily suffering, or an instance of this; an unpleasant sensation, resulting from a derangement of functions, disease, or injury by violence; hurt.
    The greatest difficulty lies in treating patients with chronic pain.
    I had to stop running when I started getting pains in my feet.
  2. (uncountable) The condition or fact of suffering or anguish especially mental, as opposed to pleasure; torment; distress; sadness; grief; solicitude; disquietude.
    In the final analysis, pain is a fact of life.
    The pain of departure was difficult to bear.
  3. (countable) An annoying person or thing.
    Your mother is a right pain.
  4. (uncountable, obsolete) Suffering inflicted as punishment or penalty.
    You may not leave this room on pain of death.
    Interpose, on pain of my displeasure. Dryden
    We will, by way of mulct or pain, lay it upon him. Bacon
    (in a mediaeval manorial court record in Cheshire, England): [Mrs. ----] is to mend all her Back Lanes sufficiently by [date] or lose her Payne.
  5. Labour; effort; pains.

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with "pain": mild, moderate, severe, intense, excruciating, debilitating, acute, chronic, sharp, dull, burning, steady, throbbing, stabbing, spasmodic, etc.

Synonyms

  • (an annoying person or thing): pest
  • See also Wikisaurus:pain

Antonyms

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

pain (third-person singular simple present pains, present participle paining, simple past and past participle pained)

  1. (transitive) To hurt; to put to bodily uneasiness or anguish; to afflict with uneasy sensations of any degree of intensity; to torment; to torture.
    The wound pained him.
  2. (transitive) To render uneasy in mind; to disquiet; to distress; to grieve.
    It pains me to say that I must let you go.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To inflict suffering upon as a penalty; to punish.

Translations

References

  • pain in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • pain in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • pain at OneLook Dictionary Search

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: memory · proved · plan · #938: pain · official · loss · spot

Anagrams


Bilbil

Noun

pain

  1. woman

References

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia (1988)

Finnish

Noun

pain

  1. Genitive singular form of pai.

Anagrams


French

Un pain. (1, 2, 3)
Pain aux raisins et renversé (café au lait) à Genève, Suisse

Etymology

From Old French pain, from Latin pānis, pānem, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to feed, to graze).

Pronunciation

Noun

pain m (plural pains)

  1. bread
  2. piece of bread
  3. food
    • 1830 Juvénal, Les Satires, translate in French verse by Barré de Jallais
      Sa nudité déplaît, sa détresse importune, / Et tous les jours, hélas ! à tout le monde en vain / Il demande une chambre, un habit et du pain.
      His nudity embarrasses, his distress importunes, / And all the days, alas! to everyone in vain / He ask a bedroom, clothes and foods.
  4. bread-and-butter needs, basic sustenance; breadwinner
    • 1830 Juvénal, Les Satires, translate in French verse by Barré de Jallais
      Ce danseur, déployant une jambe soigneuse / À tenir l’équilibre, et la corde douteuse, / Trouve dans son talent des habits et du pain, / Et son art lui subjugue et le froid et la faim : […]
  5. (informal) punch (a hit with the fist)
    • 2006, Maurice Léger, Moi, Antoinette Védrines, thanatopractrice et pilier de rugby, Publibook
      J’étais redescendue dare-dare, bien décidée à lui mettre un pain dans la tronche.
      I was redescended quickly, really steadfast to blow him a punch on his face.
  6. a block (of ice, of salt, of soap …) with the shape and size of bread
  7. (slang) (music) mistake during a performance (false note, forgot an intro, wrong solo, …)

Derived terms

Related terms

Anagrams


Gedaged

Noun

pain

  1. woman

References

  • ABVD
  • Gedaged Bible translation, Genesis 1:27: Tamol pain mai inaulak.
  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia (1988)

Matukar

Noun

pain

  1. woman

References

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia (1988)

Norman

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old French pain, from Latin pānis, pānem, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to feed, to graze).

Pronunciation

Noun

pain m (plural pains)

  1. (Jersey) bread

Derived terms


Old French

Etymology

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Noun

pain m (oblique plural painz, nominative singular painz, nominative plural pain)

  1. bread

Descendants


Ronji

Noun

pain

  1. woman

References

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia (1988)

Tagalog

Noun

pain

  1. bait for catching fish, rats, etc.

Wab

Noun

pain

  1. woman

References

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia (1988)