Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Tine

Tine

,
Noun.
[See
Teen
affliction.]
Trouble; distress; teen.
[Obs.]
“Cruel winter’s tine.”
Spenser.

Tine

,
Verb.
T.
[See
Tind
.]
To kindle; to set on fire.
[Obs.]
See
Tind
.
“To tine the cloven wood.”
Dryden.
Coals of contention and hot vengeance
tind
.
Spenser.

Tine

,
Verb.
I.
[Cf.
Tine
distress, or
Tine
to kindle.]
To kindle; to rage; to smart.
[Obs.]
Ne was there slave, ne was there medicine
That mote recure their wounds; so inly they did
tine
.
Spenser.

Tine

,
Verb.
T.
[AS.
t[GREEK]nan
, from
t[GREEK]n
an inclosure. See
Town
.]
To shut in, or inclose.
[Prov. Eng.]
Halliwell.

Tine

,
Noun.
[OE.
tind
, AS.
tind
; akin to MHG.
zint
, Icel.
tindr
, Sw.
tinne
, and probably to G.
zinne
a pinnacle, OHG.
zinna
, and E.
tooth
. See
Tooth
.]
A tooth, or spike, as of a fork; a prong, as of an antler.

Webster 1828 Edition


Tine

TINE

,
Verb.
T.
To kindle, to set on fire. [See Tind.]

TINE

,
Verb.
T.
[L. teneo.] To shut or inclose; to fill. [Not in use or local.]

TINE

,
Noun.
[L. dens.]
1.
The tooth or spike of a fork; a prong; also,the tooth of a harrow or drag.
2.
Trouble; distress. [Not in use.]

TINE

,
Verb.
I.
To rage; to smart; to fight.

Definition 2021


Tine

Tine

See also: tine, tíne, tîne, tiñe, tinë, and ține

Danish

Proper noun

Tine

  1. A female given name, diminutive of Katrine or of any name ending in -tine.

Norwegian

Proper noun

Tine

  1. A female given name, diminutive of Kristine and Martine.

tine

tine

See also: Tine and ține

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taɪn/
  • Rhymes: -aɪn

Noun

tine (plural tines)

  1. A spike or point on an implement or tool, especially a prong of a fork or a tooth of a comb
  2. A small branch, especially on an antler or horn
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

See teen (affliction).

Noun

tine

  1. (obsolete) Trouble; distress; teen.
    • Spenser
      Cruel winter's tine.

Etymology 3

See tind.

Verb

tine (third-person singular simple present tines, present participle tining, simple past and past participle tined)

  1. To kindle; to set on fire.
    • Dryden
      to tine the cloven wood
    • Spenser
      coals of contention and hot vengeance tin'd
  2. (obsolete) To rage; to smart.
    • Spenser
      Ne was there slave, ne was there medicine / That mote recure their wounds; so inly they did tine.

Etymology 4

From Old English tȳnan, from tūn (enclosure) (modern town).

Verb

tine (third-person singular simple present tines, present participle tining, simple past and past participle tined)

  1. To shut in, or enclose.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Anagrams


Aromanian

Pronoun

tine

  1. Alternative form of tini

Irish

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old Irish teine, from Proto-Celtic *teɸnets (fire) (compare Breton and Cornish tan, Welsh tân).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtʲɪnʲə]

Noun

tine f (genitive singular tine, nominative plural tinte)

  1. fire

Declension

  • Alternative genitive singular: tineadh
  • Alternative dative singular: tinidh
  • Alternative plural: tintreacha (Cois Fharraige)

Derived terms

  • lus tine m (fire-weed, rose-bay willow-herb)
  • tine ealaíne (firework)
  • tine leictreach (electric fire)

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tine thine dtine
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

  • "tine" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 teine” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Latin

Noun

tine

  1. vocative singular of tinus

Norwegian

Verb

tine

  1. thaw

Noun

tine m

  1. Traditional bentwood box

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin , as with mine, sine.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈti.ne/

Pronoun

tine (stressed accusative form of tu)

  1. (direct object, preceded by preposition, such as "pe", "cu", "la", or "pentru") you
    te iubesc pe tine - I love you

Related terms

  • te (unstressed form)

See also