Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Sore

Sore

,
Adj.
[F.
saure
,
sore
,
sor
; faucon
sor
a sore falcon. See
Sorrel
,
Noun.
]
Reddish brown; sorrel.
[R.]
Sore falcon
.
(Zool.)
See
Sore
,
Noun.
, 1.

Sore

,
Noun.
(Zool.)
A young hawk or falcon in the first year.
2.
(Zool.)
A young buck in the fourth year. See the Note under
Buck
.

Sore

,
Adj.
[
Com
par.
Sorer
;
sup
erl.
Sorest
.]
[OE.
sor
,
sar
, AS.
sār
; akin to D.
zeer
, OS. & OHG.
s[GREEK]r
, G.
sehr
very, Icel.
sārr
, Sw.
sår
, Goth.
sair
pain. Cf.
Sorry
.]
1.
Tender to the touch; susceptible of pain from pressure; inflamed; painful; – said of the body or its parts;
as, a
sore
hand
.
2.
Fig.: Sensitive; tender; easily pained, grieved, or vexed; very susceptible of irritation.
Malice and hatred are very fretting and vexatious, and apt to make our minds
sore
and uneasy.
Tillotson.
3.
Severe; afflictive; distressing;
as, a
sore
disease;
sore
evil or calamity
.
Shak.
4.
Criminal; wrong; evil.
[Obs.]
Shak.
Sore throat
(Med.)
,
inflammation of the throat and tonsils; pharyngitis. See
Cynanche
.
Malignant sore throat
,
Ulcerated sore throat
or
Putrid sore throat
.
See
Angina
, and under
Putrid
.

Sore

,
Noun.
[OE.
sor
,
sar
, AS.
sār
. See
Sore
,
Adj.
]
1.
A place in an animal body where the skin and flesh are ruptured or bruised, so as to be tender or painful; a painful or diseased place, such as an ulcer or a boil.
The dogs came and licked his
sores
.
Luke xvi. 21.
2.
Fig.: Grief; affliction; trouble; difficulty.
Chaucer.
I see plainly where his
sore
lies.
Sir W. Scott.
Gold sore
.
(Med.)
See under
Gold
,
Noun.

Sore

,
adv.
[AS.
sāre
. See
Sore
,
Adj.
]
1.
In a sore manner; with pain; grievously.
Thy hand presseth me
sore
.
Ps. xxxviii. 2.
2.
Greatly; violently; deeply.
[Hannah] prayed unto the Lord and wept
sore
.
1 Sam. i. 10.
Sore
sighed the knight, who this long sermon heard.
Dryden.

Webster 1828 Edition


Sore

SORE

,
Noun.
1.
A place in an animal body where the skin and flesh are ruptured or bruised, so as to be pained with the slightest pressure.
2.
An ulcer; a boil.
3.
In Scriptures, grief; affliction. 2 Chron. 6.

SORE

, a.
1.
Tender and susceptible of pain from pressure; as, a boil, ulcer or abscess is very sore; a wounded place is sore; inflammation renders a part sore.
2.
Tender, as the mind; easily pained, grieved or vexed; very susceptible of irritation from any thing that crosses the inclination. Malice and hatred are very fretting, and apt to make our minds sore and uneasy.
3.
Affected with inflammation; as sore eyes.
4.
Violent with pain; severe; afflictive; distressing; as a sore disease; sore evil or calamity; a sore night.
5.
Severe; violent; as a sore conflict.
6.
Criminal; evil.

SORE

,
adv.
1.
With painful violence; intensely; severely; grievously. They hand presseth me sore.
2.
Greatly; violently; deeply. He was sorely afflicted at the loss of his son. Sore sigh'd the knight, who this long sermon heard.

SORE

,
Verb.
T.
To wound; to make sore.

SORE

,
Noun.
A hawk of the first year.

Definition 2021


sore

sore

See also: söre and -sore

English

Adjective

sore (comparative sorer, superlative sorest)

  1. Causing pain or discomfort; painfully sensitive.
    Her feet were sore from walking so far.
  2. Sensitive; tender; easily pained, grieved, or vexed; very susceptible of irritation.
    • Tillotson
      Malice and hatred are very fretting and vexatious, and apt to make our minds sore and uneasy.
  3. Dire; distressing.
    The school was in sore need of textbooks, theirs having been ruined in the flood.
  4. (informal) Feeling animosity towards someone; annoyed or angered.
    Joe was sore at Bob for beating him at checkers.
  5. (obsolete) Criminal; wrong; evil.
    • 1603, William Shakespeare, Hamlet:
      ...Your water is a sore decayer of your whoreson dead body.

Derived terms

Translations

Adverb

sore (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Very, excessively, extremely (of something bad).
    They were sore afraid. The knight was sore wounded.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapterII:
      Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill. Ikey the blacksmith had forged us a spearhead after a sketch from a picture of a Greek warrior; and a rake-handle served as a shaft.
  2. Sorely.
    • 1919, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Jungle Tales of Tarzan
      [ they] were often sore pressed to follow the trail at all, and at best were so delayed that in the afternoon of the second day, they still had not overhauled the fugitive.

Noun

Sores

sore (plural sores)

  1. An injured, infected, inflamed or diseased patch of skin.
    They put ointment and a bandage on the sore.
  2. Grief; affliction; trouble; difficulty.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      I see plainly where his sore lies.
  3. A group of ducks on land. (See also: sord).
  4. A young hawk or falcon in its first year.
  5. A young buck in its fourth year.

Translations

Verb

sore (third-person singular simple present sores, present participle soring, simple past and past participle sored)

  1. (transitive) To mutilate the legs or feet of (a horse) in order to induce a particular gait.

Derived terms

See also

Anagrams


Friulian

Etymology

From Latin supra.

Preposition

sore

  1. over
  2. above

Adverb

sore

  1. above
  2. on top
  3. up

Derived terms

  • disore
  • parsore

Indonesian

Noun

sore

  1. afternoon (part of the day between noon and evening)

Istro-Romanian

Etymology

From Latin sōl, sōlem (compare Romanian soare); from Proto-Italic [Term?], from pre-Italic *sh₂wōl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥. Compare Romanian soare.

Noun

sore m (definite singular sorele, plural sori)

  1. sun

Japanese

Romanization

sore

  1. rōmaji reading of それ

Malay

Etymology

From Indonesian sore.

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sore/
  • Rhymes: -re, -e

Noun

sore

  1. afternoon (part of the day between noon and evening)

Synonyms