Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Term

Term

,
Noun.
[F.
terme
, L.
termen
,
-inis
,
terminus
, a boundary limit, end; akin to Gr. [GREEK], [GREEK]. See
Thrum
a tuft, and cf.
Terminus
,
Determine
,
Exterminate
.]
1.
That which limits the extent of anything; limit; extremity; bound; boundary.
Corruption is a reciprocal to generation, and they two are as nature’s two
terms
, or boundaries.
Bacon.
2.
The time for which anything lasts; any limited time;
as, a
term
of five years; the
term
of life
.
3.
In universities, schools, etc., a definite continuous period during which instruction is regularly given to students;
as, the school year is divided into three
terms
.
4.
(Geom.)
A point, line, or superficies, that limits;
as, a line is the
term
of a superficies, and a superficies is the
term
of a solid
.
5.
(Law)
A fixed period of time; a prescribed duration
; as:
(a)
The limitation of an estate; or rather, the whole time for which an estate is granted, as for the term of a life or lives, or for a term of years.
(b)
A space of time granted to a debtor for discharging his obligation.
(c)
The time in which a court is held or is open for the trial of causes.
Bouvier.
☞ In England, there were formerly four terms in the year, during which the superior courts were open: Hilary term, beginning on the 11th and ending on the 31st of January; Easter term, beginning on the 15th of April, and ending on the 8th of May; Trinity term, beginning on the 22d day of May, and ending on the 12th of June; Michaelmas term, beginning on the 2d and ending on the 25th day of November. The rest of the year was called vacation. But this division has been practically abolished by the Judicature Acts of 1873, 1875, which provide for the more convenient arrangement of the terms and vacations.
In the United States, the terms to be observed by the tribunals of justice are prescribed by the statutes of Congress and of the several States.
6.
(Logic)
The subject or the predicate of a proposition; one of the three component parts of a syllogism, each one of which is used twice.
The subject and predicate of a proposition are, after Aristotle, together called its
terms
or extremes.
Sir W. Hamilton.
☞ The predicate of the conclusion is called the major term, because it is the most general, and the subject of the conclusion is called the minor term, because it is less general. These are called the extermes; and the third term, introduced as a common measure between them, is called the mean or middle term. Thus in the following syllogism, –
Every vegetable is combustible; Every tree is a vegetable; Therefore every tree is combustible, -combustible, the predicate of the conclusion, is the major term; tree is the minor term; vegetable is the middle term.
7.
A word or expression; specifically, one that has a precisely limited meaning in certain relations and uses, or is peculiar to a science, art, profession, or the like;
as, a technical
term
.
Terms quaint of law.”
Chaucer.
In painting, the greatest beauties can not always be expressed for want of
terms
.
Dryden.
8.
(Arch.)
A quadrangular pillar, adorned on the top with the figure of a head, as of a man, woman, or satyr; – called also
terminal figure
. See
Terminus
,
Noun.
, 2 and 3.
☞ The pillar part frequently tapers downward, or is narrowest at the base. Terms rudely carved were formerly used for landmarks or boundaries.
Gwilt.
9.
(Alg.)
A member of a compound quantity;
as, a or b in
a + b
; ab or cd in
ab - cd
.
10.
pl.
(Med.)
The menses.
11.
pl.
(Law)
Propositions or promises, as in contracts, which, when assented to or accepted by another, settle the contract and bind the parties; conditions.
12.
(Law)
In Scotland, the time fixed for the payment of rents.
Terms legal and conventional in Scotland correspond to quarter days in England and Ireland. There are two legal terms – Whitsunday, May 15, and Martinmas, Nov. 11; and two conventional terms – Candlemas, Feb. 2, and Lammas day, Aug. 1.
Mozley & W.
13.
(Naut.)
A piece of carved work placed under each end of the taffrail.
J. Knowels.
In term
,
in set terms; in formal phrase.
[Obs.]

I can not speak
in term
.
Chaucer.
Term fee
(Law)
(a)
,
a fee by the term, chargeable to a suitor, or by law fixed and taxable in the costs of a cause for each or any term it is in court.
Terms of a proportion
(Math.)
,
the four members of which it is composed.
To bring to terms
,
to compel (one) to agree, assent, or submit; to force (one) to come to terms.
To make terms
,
to come to terms; to make an agreement: to agree.
Syn. – Limit; bound; boundary; condition; stipulation; word; expression.
Term
,
Word
. These are more frequently interchanged than almost any other vocables that occur of the language. There is, however, a difference between them which is worthy of being kept in mind. Word is generic; it denotes an utterance which represents or expresses our thoughts and feelings. Term originally denoted one of the two essential members of a proposition in logic, and hence signifies a word of specific meaning, and applicable to a definite class of objects. Thus, we may speak of a scientific or a technical term, and of stating things in distinct terms. Thus we say, “the term minister literally denotes servant;” “an exact definition of terms is essential to clearness of thought;” “no term of reproach can sufficiently express my indignation;” “every art has its peculiar and distinctive terms,” etc. So also we say, “purity of style depends on the choice of words, and precision of style on a clear understanding of the terms used.” Term is chiefly applied to verbs, nouns, and adjectives, these being capable of standing as terms in a logical proposition; while prepositions and conjunctions, which can never be so employed, are rarely spoken of as terms, but simply as words.

Term

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Termed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Terming
.]
[See
Term
,
Noun.
, and cf.
Terminate
.]
To apply a term to; to name; to call; to denominate.
Men
term
what is beyond the limits of the universe “imaginary space.”
Locke.

Webster 1828 Edition


Term

TERM

,
Noun.
[L. terminus, a limit or boundary.]
1.
A limit; a bound or boundary; the extremity of any thing; that which limits its extent.
Corruption is a reciprocal to generation, and they two are as nature's two terms or boundaries.
2.
The time for which any thing lasts; any limited time; as the term of five years; the term of life.
3.
In geometry, a point or line that limits. A line is the term of a superficies, and a superficies is the term of a solid.
4.
In law, the limitation of an estate; or rather the whole time or duration of an estate; as a lease for the term of life, for the term of three lives, for the term of twenty one years.
5.
In law, the time in which a court is held or open for the trial of causes. In England,there are four terms in the year; Hilary term, from January 23d to February 12th; Easter term, from Wednesday, fortnight after Easter, to the Monday next after Ascension day; Trinity term, from Friday next after Trinity Sunday to the Wednesday, fortnight after; and Michaelmas term, from November 6th to the 28th. These terms are observed by the courts of king's bench, the common pleas and exchequer, but not by the parliament, the chancery or by inferior courts. The rest of the year is called vacation. In the United States, the terms to be observed by the tribunals of justice, are prescribed by the statutes of congress and of the several states.
6.
In universities and colleges, the time during which instruction is regularly given to students, who are obliged by the statutes and laws of the institution to attend to the recitations, lectures and other exercises.
7.
In grammar, a word or expression; that which fixes or determines ideas.
In painting, the greatest beauties cannot be always expressed for want of terms.
8.
In the arts, a word or expression that denotes something peculiar to an art; as a technical term.
9.
In logic, a syllogism consists of three terms, the major, the minor, and the middle. The predicate of the conclusion is called the major term, because it is the most general, and the subject of the conclusion is called the minor term, because it is less general. These are called the extremes; and the third term, introduced as a common measure between them, is called the mean or middle term. Thus in the following syllogism.
Every vegetable is combustible;
Every tree is vegetable;
Therefore every tree is combustible.
Combustible is the predicate of the conclusion, or the major term; every tree is the minor term; vegetable is the middle term.
10. In architecture, a kind of statues or columns adorned on the top with the figure of a head, either of a man, woman or satyr. Terms are sometimes used as consoles, and sustain entablatures; and sometimes as statues to adorn gardens.
11. Among the ancients, terms, termini miliares, were the heads of certain divinities placed on square land-marks of stone, to mark the several stadia on roads. These were dedicated to Mercury, who was supposed to preside over highways.
12. In algebra, a member of a compound quantity; as a, in a+b; or ab, in ab+cd.
13. Among physicians, the monthly courses of females are called terms.
14. In contracts, terms, in the plural, are conditions; propositions stated or promises made, which when assented to or accepted by another, settle the contract and bind the parties. A engages to build a house for B for a specific sum of money, in a given time; these are his terms. When B promises to give to A that sum for building the house, he has agreed to the terms; the contract is completed and binding upon both parties.
Terms of proportion, in mathematics, are such numbers, letters or quantities as are compared one with another.
To make terms, to come to an agreement.
To come to terms, to agree; to come to an agreement.
To bring to terms, to reduce to submission or to conditions.

TERM

,
Verb.
T.
To name; to call; to denominate.
Men term what is beyond the limits of the universe, imaginary space.

Definition 2022


Term

Term

See also: term

German

Noun

Term m (genitive Terms, plural Terme)

  1. (mathematics) term

term

term

See also: Term

English

Noun

term (plural terms)

  1. Limitation, restriction or regulation. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  2. Any of the binding conditions or promises in a legal contract.
    Be sure to read the terms and conditions before signing.
  3. That which limits the extent of anything; limit; extremity; bound; boundary.
    • Francis Bacon
      Corruption is a reciprocal to generation, and they two are as nature's two terms, or boundaries.
  4. (geometry) A point, line, or superficies that limits.
    A line is the term of a superficies, and a superficies is the term of a solid.
  5. A word or phrase, especially one from a specialised area of knowledge.
    "Algorithm" is a term used in computer science.
  6. Relations among people.
    We are on friendly terms with each other.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 22, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Not unnaturally, Auntie took this communication in bad part. [] Next day she [] tried to recover her ward by the hair of the head. Then, thwarted, the wretched creature went to the police for help; she was versed in the law, and had perhaps spared no pains to keep on good terms with the local constabulary.
  7. Part of a year, especially one of the three parts of an academic year.
  8. (mathematics) Any value (variable or constant) or expression separated from another term by a space or an appropriate character, in an overall expression or table.
    All the terms of this sum cancel out.
    One only term is odd in (12; 3; 4).
  9. (logic) The subject or the predicate of a proposition; one of the three component parts of a syllogism, each one of which is used twice.
    • Sir W. Hamilton
      The subject and predicate of a proposition are, after Aristotle, together called its terms or extremes.
  10. (architecture) A quadrangular pillar, adorned on top with the figure of a head, as of a man, woman, or satyr.
  11. Duration of a set length; period in office of fixed length.
    He was sentenced to a term of six years in prison.
    near-term, mid-term and long-term goals
    the term allowed to a debtor to discharge his debt
  12. (computing) A terminal emulator, a program that emulates a video terminal.
  13. (of a patent) The maximum period during which the patent can be maintained into force.
  14. (astrology) An essential dignity in which unequal segments of every astrological sign have internal rulerships which affect the power and integrity of each planet in a natal chart.
  15. (archaic) A menstrual period.
    • 1660, Samuel Pepys, Diary
      My wife, after the absence of her terms for seven weeks, gave me hopes of her being with child, but on the last day of the year she hath them again.
  16. (nautical) A piece of carved work placed under each end of the taffrail.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of J. Knowles to this entry?)

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

Verb

term (third-person singular simple present terms, present participle terming, simple past and past participle termed)

  1. To phrase a certain way, especially with an unusual wording.
    • 1867, Charles Sanders Peirce, On a New List of Categories:
      Abstraction or prescision ought to be carefully distinguished from two other modes of mental separation, which may be termed discrimination and dissociation.
    • 2013 September-October, Henry Petroski, The Evolution of Eyeglasses”, in American Scientist:
      The ability of a segment of a glass sphere to magnify whatever is placed before it was known around the year 1000, when the spherical segment was called a reading stone, essentially what today we might term a frameless magnifying glass or plain glass paperweight.

Albanian

Etymology

From ter.

Noun

term m (indefinite plural terma, definite singular terma, definite plural termat)

  1. foundation, plot of land

Related terms


Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

term m (plural termen, diminutive termpje n)

  1. term; A word or phrase, especially one from a specialised area of knowledge.
  2. (mathematics) term; One of the addends in a sum

Derived terms

Anagrams


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin terminus, via French terme and English term

Noun

term m (definite singular termen, indefinite plural termer, definite plural termene)

  1. a term (word or phrase)

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin terminus, via French terme and English term

Noun

term m (definite singular termen, indefinite plural termar, definite plural termane)

  1. a term (word or phrase)

References


Swedish

Noun

term c

  1. a term[1] (a well-defined word or phrase, in a terminology)
  2. (mathematics) a term[2] (an operand in addition or subtraction)
  3. singular of termer (thermae, Roman baths) (a facility for bathing in ancient Rome)

Declension

Inflection of term 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative term termen termer termerna
Genitive terms termens termers termernas

Related terms

References

  1. term in Rikstermbanken
  2. term in Rikstermbanken