Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Many

Ma′ny

,
Noun.
[See
Meine
,
Mansion
.]
A retinue of servants; a household.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.

Ma′ny

,
Adj.
& p
ron.
[It has no variation to express degrees of comparison; more and most, which are used for the comparative and superlative degrees, are from a different root.]
[OE.
mani
,
moni
, AS.
manig
,
mænig
,
monig
; akin to D.
menig
, OS. & OHG.
manag
, G.
manch
, Dan.
mange
, Sw.
månge
, Goth.
manags
, OSlav.
mnog’
, Russ.
mnogii
; cf. Icel.
margr
, Prov. E.
mort
. √103.]
Consisting of a great number; numerous; not few.
Thou shalt be a father of
many
nations.
Gen. xvii. 4.
Not
many
wise men after the flesh, not
many
mighty, not
many
noble, are called.
1 Cor. i. 26.
Many is freely prefixed to participles, forming compounds which need no special explanation; as, many-angled, many-celled, many-eyed, many-footed, many-handed, many-leaved, many-lettered, many-named, many-peopled, many-petaled, many-seeded, many-syllabled (polysyllabic), many-tongued, many-voiced, many-wived, and the like. In such usage it is equivalent to
multi
. Comparison is often expressed by many with as or so. “As many as were willing hearted . . . brought bracelets.”
Exod. xxxv. 22.
“So many laws argue so many sins.”
Milton.
Many stands with a singular substantive with a or an.
Many a
,
a large number taken distributively; each one of many.
“For thy sake have I shed many a tear.”
Shak.
“Full many a gem of purest ray serene.”
Gray.
Many one
,
many a one; many persons.
Bk. of Com. Prayer.
The many
,
the majority; – opposed to
the few
. See
Many
,
Noun.
Too many
,
too numerous; hence, too powerful;
as, they are
too many
for us
.
L'Estrange.
Syn. – Numerous; multiplied; frequent; manifold; various; divers; sundry.

Ma′ny

,
Noun.
[AS.
menigeo
,
menigo
,
menio
, multitude; akin to G.
menge
, OHG.
managī
,
menigī
, Goth.
managei
. See
Many
,
Adj.
]
1.
The populace; the common people; the majority of people, or of a community.
After him the rascal
many
ran.
Spenser.
2.
A large or considerable number.
A
many
of our bodies shall no doubt
Find native graves.
Shakespeare
Seeing a great
many
in rich gowns.
Addison.
It will be concluded by
many
that he lived like an honest man.
Fielding.
☞ In this sense, many is connected immediately with another substantive (without of) to show of what the many consists; as, a good many [of] people think so.
He is liable to a great
many
inconveniences.
Tillotson.

Webster 1828 Edition


Many

MANY

,
Adj.
men'ny.
1.
Numerous; comprising a great number of individuals.
Thou shalt be a father of many nations. Gen.17.
Not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called. 1 Cor.1.
Many are the afflictions of the righteous. Ps.34.
It is often preceded by as or so, and followed by so, indicating an equal number.
As many books as you take, so many shall be charged to your account.
So many laws argue so many sins.
It is followed by as.
As many as were willing-hearted brought bracelets. Ex.34.
It precedes an or a, before a noun in the singular number.
Full many a gem of purest ray serene.
2.
In low language, preceded by too, it denotes powerful or much; as, they are too many for us.

MANY

,
Noun.
men'ny. A multitude; a great number of individuals; the people.
O thou fond many.
The vulgar and the many are fit only to be led or driven.

MANY

,
Noun.
men'ny. A retinue of servants; household.

Definition 2021


many

many

See also: -mány

English

Determiner

many (comparative more, superlative most)

  1. An indefinite large number of.
    many people enjoy playing chess; there are many different ways to cook a meal
    • Bible, Genesis xvii.4:
      Thou shalt be a father of many nations.
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall, The Squire's Daughter, chapterIII:
      The big houses, and there are a good many of them, lie for the most part in what may be called by courtesy the valleys. You catch a glimpse of them sometimes at a little distance from the [railway] line, which seems to have shown some ingenuity in avoiding them, [].
    • 2013 July 6, The rise of smart beta”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8843, page 68:
      Investors face a quandary. Cash offers a return of virtually zero in many developed countries; government-bond yields may have risen in recent weeks but they are still unattractive. Equities have suffered two big bear markets since 2000 and are wobbling again. It is hardly surprising that pension funds, insurers and endowments are searching for new sources of return.

Usage notes

  • Many is used with plural nouns only (except in the combination many a). Its singular counterpart is much, which is used with uncountable nouns. Many and much merge in the comparison forms, which are more and most for both determiners.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Translations

Pronoun

many

  1. A collective mass of people.
    Democracy must balance the rights of the few against the will of the many
    A great many do not understand this.
  2. An indefinite large number of people or things.
    Many are called, but few are chosen.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 4, in A Cuckoo in the Nest:
      By some paradoxical evolution rancour and intolerance have been established in the vanguard of primitive Christianity. Mrs. Spoker, in common with many of the stricter disciples of righteousness, was as inclement in demeanour as she was cadaverous in aspect.

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Quotations

  • 1611King James Version of the Bible, Luke 1:1
    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us...

Noun

many (plural manies)

  1. A multitude; a great aggregate; a mass of people; the generality; the common herd.
  2. A considerable number.

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: even · say · well · #125: many · work · too · every

Anagrams


Maricopa

Pronoun

many

  1. (personal) you