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Webster 1913 Edition


Real

Re′al

(rē′al)
,
Noun.
[Sp., fr.
real
royal, L.
regalis
. See
Regal
, and cf.
Ree
a coin.]
A former small Spanish silver coin; also, a denomination of money of account, formerly the unit of the Spanish monetary system.

Re-al′

(rā̍-äl′)
,
Adj.
Royal; regal; kingly.
[Obs.]
“The blood real of Thebes.”
Chaucer.

Re′al

(rē′al)
,
Adj.
[LL.
realis
, fr. L.
res
,
rei
, a thing: cf. F.
réel
. Cf.
Rebus
.]
1.
Actually being or existing; not fictitious or imaginary;
as, a description of
real
life
.
Whereat I waked, and found
Before mine eyes all
real
, as the dream
Had lively shadowed.
Milton.
2.
True; genuine; not artificial, counterfeit, or factitious; often opposed to
ostensible
;
as, the
real
reason;
real
Madeira wine;
real
ginger.
Whose perfection far excelled
Hers in all
real
dignity.
Milton.
3.
Relating to things, not to persons.
[Obs.]
Many are perfect in men’s humors that are not greatly capable of the
real
part of business.
Bacon.
4.
(Alg.)
Having an assignable arithmetical or numerical value or meaning; not imaginary.
5.
(Law)
Pertaining to things fixed, permanent, or immovable, as to lands and tenements;
as,
real
property, in distinction from
personal
or
movable
property
.
Chattels real
(Law)
,
such chattels as are annexed to, or savor of, the realty, as terms for years of land. See
Chattel
.
Real action
(Law)
,
an action for the recovery of real property.
Real assets
(Law)
,
lands or real estate in the hands of the heir, chargeable with the debts of the ancestor.
Real composition
(Eccl. Law)
,
an agreement made between the owner of lands and the parson or vicar, with consent of the ordinary, that such lands shall be discharged from payment of tithes, in consequence of other land or recompense given to the parson in lieu and satisfaction thereof.
Blackstone.
Real estate
or
Real property
,
lands, tenements, and hereditaments; freehold interests in landed property; property in houses and land.
Kent.
Burrill.
Real presence
(R. C. Ch.)
,
the actual presence of the body and blood of Christ in the eucharist, or the conversion of the substance of the bread and wine into the real body and blood of Christ; transubstantiation. In other churches there is a belief in a form of real presence, not however in the sense of transubstantiation.
Real servitude
, called also
Predial servitude
(Civil Law)
,
a burden imposed upon one estate in favor of another estate of another proprietor.
Erskine.
Bouvier.
Syn. – Actual; true; genuine; authentic.
Real
,
Actual
. Real represents a thing to be a substantive existence;
as, a
real
, not imaginary, occurrence
. Actual refers to it as acted or performed; and, hence, when we wish to prove a thing real, we often say, “It actually exists,” “It has actually been done.” Thus its reality is shown by its actuality. Actual, from this reference to being acted, has recently received a new signification, namely, present; as, the actual posture of affairs; since what is now in action, or going on, has, of course, a present existence. An actual fact; a real sentiment.
For he that but conceives a crime in thought,
Contracts the danger of an
actual
fault.
Dryden.
Our simple ideas are all
real
; all agree to the
reality
of things.
Locke.

Re′al

(rē′al)
,
Noun.
A realist.
[Obs.]
Burton.

Webster 1828 Edition


Real

RE'AL

,
Adj.
[Low L. realis. The L. res and Eng. thing coincide exactly with the Heb. a word, a thing, an event. See Read and Thing.]
1.
Actually being or existing; not fictitious or imaginary; as a description of real life. The author describes a real scene or transaction.
2.
True; genuine; not artificial, counterfeit or factitious; as real Madeira wine; real ginger.
3.
True; genuine; not affected; not assumed. The woman appears in her real character.
4.
Relating to things, not to persons; not personal.
Many are perfect in men's humors, that are not greatly capable of the real part of business. [Little used or obsolete.]
5.
In law, pertaining to things fixed, permanent or immovable, as to lands and tenements; as real estate, opposed to personal or movable property.
Real action, in law, is an action which concerns real property.
Real assets, assets consisting in real estate, or lands and tenements descending to an heir, sufficient to answer the charges upon the estate created by the ancestor.
Chattels real, are such chattels as concern or savor of the reality; as a term for years of land, wardships in chivalry, the next presentation to a church, estate by statue-merchant, elegit, &c.
Real composition, is when an agreement is made between the owner of lands and the parson or vicar, with consent of the ordinary, that such lands shall be discharged from payment of tithes, in consequence of other land or recompense given to the parson in lieu and satisfaction thereof.
Real presence, in the Romish church, the actual presence of the body and blood of Christ in the eucharist, or the conversion of the substance of the bread and wine into the real body and blood of Christ.

RE'AL

,

Definition 2022


Real

Real

See also: real, réal, and real.

English

Proper noun

Real

  1. Real Madrid, a football club from Madrid.

Catalan

Alternative forms

  • Ral
  • Ral i Ordelló

Pronunciation

  • (standard) IPA(key): /reˈaɫ/
  • (Northern) IPA(key): /ˈraɫ/

Proper noun

Real m

  1. Town of the Capcir district, in the Northern Catalonia, now part of the Pyrénées-Orientales department in France.
  2. A Catalan surname.

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʀeˈaːl/
  • Rhymes: -aːl

Noun

Real m (genitive Reals, plural Reales)

  1. real (Spanish currency unit)

Noun

Real m (genitive Reals, plural Reis)

  1. real (Portuguese and Brazilian currency unit)

real

real

See also: Real, real., and réal

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rēəl, rēl, IPA(key): /ˈɹiːəl/, /ɹiːl/
  • Homophone: reel

Adjective

real (comparative realer or more real, superlative realest or most real)

  1. True, genuine, not merely nominal or apparent.
    • 2007, Jim Kokoris, The Rich Part of Life: A Novel (ISBN 1429976438), page 179:
      [T]he real reason he didn't come was because he was scared of flying[.]
    • 2013 June 29, Travels and travails”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 55:
      Even without hovering drones, a lurking assassin, a thumping score and a denouement, the real-life story of Edward Snowden, a rogue spy on the run, could be straight out of the cinema. But, as with Hollywood, the subplots and exotic locations may distract from the real message: America’s discomfort and its foes’ glee.
  2. Genuine, not artificial, counterfeit, or fake.
    • 2013 June 1, “A better waterworks”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 5 (Technology Quarterly):
      An artificial kidney these days still means a refrigerator-sized dialysis machine. Such devices mimic the way real kidneys cleanse blood and eject impurities and surplus water as urine.
    This is real leather.
  3. Genuine, unfeigned, sincere.
    • Milton:
      Whose perfection far excelled / Hers in all real dignity.
    • 2013 June 21, Oliver Burkeman, The tao of tech”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 2, page 27:
      The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about [], or offering services that let you [] "share the things you love with the world" and so on. But the real way to build a successful online business is to be better than your rivals at undermining people's control of their own attention.
    These are real tears!
  4. Actually being, existing, or occurring; not fictitious or imaginary.
    a description of real life
    • Milton:
      I waked, and found / Before mine eyes all real, as the dream / Had lively shadowed.
  5. That has objective, physical existence.
    No one has ever seen a real unicorn.
  6. (economics) Having been adjusted to remove the effects of inflation; measured in purchasing power (contrast nominal).
    My dad calculated my family's real consumption per month.
    What is the real GNP of this polity?
  7. (economics) Relating to the result of the actions of rational agents; relating to neoclassical economic models as opposed to Keynesian models.
  8. (mathematics, of a number) Being either a rational number, or the limit of a convergent infinite sequence of rational numbers: being one of a set of numbers with a one-to-one correspondence to the points on a line.
  9. (law) Relating to immovable tangible property.
    real estate;  real property
    • Francis Bacon
      Many are perfect in men's humours that are not greatly capable of the real part of business.
  10. Absolute, complete, utter.
    This is a real problem.
  11. (slang) Signifying meritorious qualities or actions especially as regard the enjoyment of life, prowess at sports, or success wooing potential partners.
    I'm keeping it real.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Adverb

real (not comparable)

  1. (US, colloquial) Really, very.
Translations

Noun

real (plural reals)

  1. A commodity; see reality.
  2. (grammar) One of the three genders that the common gender can be separated into in the Scandinavian languages.
  3. (mathematics) A real number.
    • 2007, Mark Bridges, REAL ANALYSIS: A Constructive Approach, Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, page 11:
      There have been several classical constructions of the reals that avoid these problems, the most famous ones being Dedekind Cuts and Cauchy Sequences, named respectively for the mathematicians Richard Dedekind (1831 - 1916) and Augustine Cauchy (1789 - 1857). We will not discuss these constructions here, but will use a more modern one developed by Gabriel Stolzenberg, based on "interval arithmetic."
  4. (obsolete) A realist.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burton to this entry?)
Translations

Etymology 2

From Spanish real (royal), from Latin rēgālis (regal, royal). Doublet of regal and royal

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: rāäl', IPA(key): /ɹeɪˈɑːl/
  • (US) enPR: rāäl', IPA(key): /ɹeɪˈɑl/

Noun

real (plural reales)

  1. Former unit of currency of Spain and Spain's colonies.
  2. A coin worth one real.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Portuguese real (royal), from Latin rēgālis (regal; royal).

Noun

real (plural reis or réis or reals)

  1. A unit of currency used in Portugal and its colonies from 1430 until 1911, and in Brazil from 1790 until 1942
  2. A coin worth one real.

real (plural reais or reals)

Brazilian real coins (2nd family, as of 2010)
  1. A unit of currency used in Brazil since 1994. Symbol: R$.
    • 2011, Perry Anderson, "Lula's Brazil", London Review of Books, 33.VII:
      Within weeks of this bombshell, an aide to the brother of the chairman of the PT, José Genoino, was arrested boarding a flight with 200,000 reais in a suitcase and $100,000 in his underpants.
  2. A coin worth one real.
Synonyms
  • (old Portuguese and Brazilian unit of currency): rei
Meronyms
  • (current Brazilian unit of currency): centavo
Related terms
Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: age · nearly · miles · #493: real · eye · sun · cut

Anagrams


Catalan

Adjective

real m, f (masculine and feminine plural reals)

  1. real

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

From Late Latin reālis (real, actual), from Latin rēs (matter, thing).

Adjective

real

  1. real (true, genuine)
  2. real (that has physical existence)

Synonyms

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary], Simferopol: Dolya, ISBN 966-7980-89-8

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁeˈal/
  • Rhymes: -aːl

Adjective

real (comparative realer, superlative am realsten)

  1. that has physical existence; real
  2. pertaining to reality; real, realistic
    Diese Geschichte ist nicht real.
    Sie ist ein kluges Mädchen; sie denkt real.
    reale Pläne
  3. (economics) real (not nominal), measured in purchasing power

Declension

Synonyms

See also


Old French

Adjective

real m (oblique and nominative feminine singular real or reale)

  1. Alternative form of roial

Declension


Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /heˈaw/, /xeˈaw/, /ɾeˈaw/
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈʁjaɫ/
  • Hyphenation: re‧al

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Late Latin reālis (actual), from Latin rēs (matter, thing), from Proto-Indo-European *rēy- (thing; possession).

Adjective

real m, f (plural reais, comparable)

  1. true, real
  2. that has physical existence; real
  3. (mathematics, of a number) being a member of the set of real numbers; real
Inflection

Noun

real m (plural reais)

  1. a real number

Related terms

Etymology 2

Moeda brasileira de 1 real

From Latin rēgālis (royal), from rēx (king) + -alis, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (ruler, king).

Adjective

real m, f (plural reais, comparable)

  1. of or relating to the monarchy; royal; regal
  2. having the air or demeanour of a monarch; regal
Related terms

Noun

real m (plural reais)

  1. a former Spanish currency
  2. the current Brazilian currency

Noun

real m (plural reais or réis)

  1. a former currency of Portugal and its colonies (the plural later became réis)

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French réel, from Late Latin reālis (real, actual), from Latin rēs (matter, thing)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [reˈal]

Adjective

real m, n (feminine singular reală, masculine plural reali, feminine and neuter plural reale)

  1. real

Declension

Antonyms

See also


Spanish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -al

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Late Latin reālis (actual) from Latin rēs (matter, thing).

Adjective

real m, f (plural reales)

  1. real
Synonyms
Antonyms
Related terms

Etymology 2

From Latin rēgālis (regal, royal).

Adjective

real m, f (plural reales)

  1. royal
Synonyms
Antonyms

Noun

real m (plural reales)

  1. real (unit of currency)

Swedish

Adjective

real (not comparable)

  1. objective, real, pertaining to real and physical objects

Declension

Inflection of real
Indefinite/attributive Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular real
Neuter singular realt
Plural reala
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 reale
All reala
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in an attributive role.

Synonyms

Noun

real c

  1. Short for realskola.
  2. Short for realskoleexamen.
  3. real (currency of Brazil and formerly Portugal)

Declension

Inflection of real 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative real realen realer realerna
Genitive reals realens realers realernas

References