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Webster 1913 Edition


Into

In′to

,
p
rep.
[
In
+
to
.]
To the inside of; within. It is used in a variety of applications.
1.
Expressing entrance, or a passing from the outside of a thing to its interior parts; – following verbs expressing motion;
as, come
into
the house; go
into
the church; one stream falls or runs
into
another; water enters
into
the fine vessels of plants.
2.
Expressing penetration beyond the outside or surface, or access to the inside, or contents;
as, to look
into
a letter or book; to look
into
an apartment.
3.
Indicating insertion;
as, to infuse more spirit or animation
into
a composition
.
4.
Denoting inclusion;
as, put these ideas
into
other words
.
5.
Indicating the passing of a thing from one form, condition, or state to another;
as, compound substances may be resolved
into
others which are more simple; ice is convertible
into
water, and water
into
vapor; men are more easily drawn than forced
into
compliance; we may reduce many distinct substances
into
one mass; men are led by evidence
into
belief of truth, and are often enticed
into
the commission of crimes; she burst
into
tears; children are sometimes frightened
into
fits; all persons are liable to be seduced
into
error and folly.
Compare
In
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Into

IN'TO

, prep. [in and to.] Noting entrance or a passing from the outside of a thing to its interior parts. It follows verbs expressing motion. Come into the house; go into the church; one stream falls or runs into another. Water enters into the fine vessels of plants.
1.
Noting penetration beyond the outside or surface, or access to it. Look into a letter or book; look into an apartment.
2.
Noting insertion. Infuse more spirit or animation into the composition.
3.
Noting mixture. Put other ingredients into the compound.
4.
Noting inclusion. Put these ideas into other words.
5.
Noting the passing of a thing from one form or state to another. Compound substances may be resolved into others which are more simple; ice is convertible into water, and water into vapor. Men are more easily drawn than forced into compliance. We reduce many distinct substances into one mass. We are led by evidence into belief of truth. Men are often enticed into the commission of crimes. Children are sometimes frightened into fits, and we are all liable to be seduced into error and folly.

Definition 2021


Into

Into

See also: into, INTO, intő, -into, and in-to

Finnish

Proper noun

Into

  1. A male given name.

Declension

Inflection of Into (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative Into Intot
genitive Inton Intojen
partitive Intoa Intoja
illative Intoon Intoihin
singular plural
nominative Into Intot
accusative nom. Into Intot
gen. Inton
genitive Inton Intojen
partitive Intoa Intoja
inessive Intossa Intoissa
elative Intosta Intoista
illative Intoon Intoihin
adessive Intolla Intoilla
ablative Intolta Intoilta
allative Intolle Intoille
essive Intona Intoina
translative Intoksi Intoiksi
instructive Intoin
abessive Intotta Intoitta
comitative Intoineen

Anagrams

into

into

See also: Into, INTO, intő, -into, and in-to

English

Preposition

into

  1. Going inside (of).
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, in The Celebrity:
      He used to drop into my chambers once in a while to smoke, and was first-rate company. When I gave a dinner there was generally a cover laid for him. I liked the man for his own sake, and even had he promised to turn out a celebrity it would have had no weight with me.
    • 2011 November 3, Chris Bevan, Rubin Kazan 1-0 Tottenham”, in BBC Sport:
      This time Cudicini was left helpless when Natcho stepped up to expertly curl the ball into the top corner.
    Mary danced into the house.
  2. Going to a geographic region.
    we left the house and walked into the street;  the plane flew into the open air
  3. Against, especially with force or violence.
    The car crashed into the tree;  I wasn't careful, and walked into a wall
  4. Producing, becoming.
    • 2002, Matt Cyr, Something to Teach Me: Journal of an American in the Mountains of Haiti, Educa Vision, Inc., ISBN 1584321385, 25:
      His English is still in its beginning stages, like my Creole, but he was able to translate some Creole songs that he's written into English—not the best English, but English nonetheless.
    • 2013 July 19, Peter Wilby, Finland spreads word on schools”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 30:
      Imagine a country where children do nothing but play until they start compulsory schooling at age seven. Then, without exception, they attend comprehensives until the age of 16. Charging school fees is illegal, and so is sorting pupils into ability groups by streaming or setting.
    I carved the piece of driftwood into a sculpture of a whale.   Right before our eyes, Jake turned into a wolf!
  5. After the start of.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 13, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      […] They talk of you as if you were Croesus—and I expect the beggars sponge on you unconscionably. And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes.
    About 20 minutes into the flight, the pilot reported a fire on board.
  6. (colloquial) Intensely interested in or attracted to.
    she's really into Shakespeare right now;  I'm so into you!
  7. (mathematics) Taking distinct arguments to distinct values.
    The exponential function maps the set of real numbers into itself.
  8. (Britain, archaic, India, mathematics) Expressing the operation of multiplication.[1]
    Five into three is fifteen.
  9. (mathematics) Expressing the operation of division, with the denominator given first. Usually with "goes".
    Three into two won't go.
    24 goes into 48 how many times?
  10. Investigating the subject (of).
    Call for research into pesticides blamed for vanishing bees.

Related terms

Derived terms

Translations

References

  1. “into”, in OED Online, Oxford: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.
  • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Bounded landmarks", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: there · more · out · #55: into · up · your · any

Anagrams


Finnish

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *inþōn- or *inþiōn-, cf. Old Swedish inna.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈinto/
  • Hyphenation: in‧to

Noun

into

  1. eagerness, enthusiasm
    odottaa innolla (+ partitive) = to look forward to
  2. passion, fervour/fervor, ardour/ardor
  3. zeal, fanaticism

Declension

Inflection of into (Kotus type 1/valo, nt-nn gradation)
nominative into innot
genitive innon intojen
partitive intoa intoja
illative intoon intoihin
singular plural
nominative into innot
accusative nom. into innot
gen. innon
genitive innon intojen
partitive intoa intoja
inessive innossa innoissa
elative innosta innoista
illative intoon intoihin
adessive innolla innoilla
ablative innolta innoilta
allative innolle innoille
essive intona intoina
translative innoksi innoiksi
instructive innoin
abessive innotta innoitta
comitative intoineen

Synonyms

  • (eagerness, enthusiasm): innokkuus, innostus
  • (passion, fervo(u)r, ardo(u)r): intohimo
  • (zeal, fanaticism): kiihko

Derived terms

Compounds

Anagrams


Neapolitan

Etymology

From Latin intus

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ind̪ɐ/

Preposition

into

  1. in (surrounded by)

Old English

Etymology

Compound of in and

Preposition

intō

  1. into

Yemsa

Noun

into

  1. mother

References

  • David Appleyard, Beja as a Cushitic language, in Egyptian and Semito-Hamitic (Afro-Asiatic) Studies: In Memoriam W. Vycichl (Yem into "mother")