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Webster 1913 Edition


Auf

Auf

(a̤f)
,
Noun.
[OE.
auph
,
aulf
, fr. Icel.
ālfr
elf. See
Elf
.]
[Also spelt
oaf
,
ouphe
.]
A changeling or elf child, – that is, one left by fairies; a deformed or foolish child; a simpleton; an oaf.
[Obs.]
Drayton.

Webster 1828 Edition


Auf

AUF

,
Noun.
A fool; a simpleton. [See Oaf.]

Definition 2021


auf

auf

See also: auf-

English

Alternative forms

Noun

auf (plural aufs)

  1. (obsolete) A changeling or elf child; a child left by fairies.
  2. (obsolete) A deformed or foolish child; a simpleton; an oaf.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Drayton to this entry?)


German

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle High German ūf, from Old High German ūf, from Proto-Germanic *upp. This form with a lengthened vowel is originally Upper German. Central German forms were Middle High German uf and (western) up. Compare Luxembourgish op, Dutch op, English up.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aʊ̯f/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ̯f

Preposition

auf

  1. (with dative) on, upon
    Das Buch liegt auf dem Tisch.
    The book is lying on the table.
  2. (with accusative) on, onto
    Leg das Buch auf den Tisch!
    Put the book on the table!
  3. (colloquial, otherwise archaic, regional, northern and western Germany) on (a day; usually of the week)
    Du kannst doch auf (’n) Sonntag nich’ den Rasen mähen!
    You can’t mow the lawn on a Sunday!

Usage notes

  • The preposition is used with accusative case when the verb shows movement from one place to another, whereas it is used with dative case when the verb shows location.
  • Generally speaking, auf is used when referring to something being on a horizontal surface, as opposed to an, which usually points to a vertical surface.

Synonyms

  • (on a day): an

Adverb

auf

  1. (somewhat informal) open
    Die Tür ist auf.
    The door is open.
  2. (colloquial) finished; gone (food)
    Hast du deine Suppe auf?
    Have you finished your soup?
    Die Milch is’ auf.
    The milk is gone. (= All the milk has been consumed.)

Usage notes

  • Compare to the latter example the phrase: Die Milch ist aus, which would mean that all the milk has been sold out, e.g. from a supermarket.

Synonyms

Interjection

auf

  1. carry on
  2. have a go