Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Date

Date

,
Noun.
[F.
datte
, L.
dactylus
, fr. Gr.
[GREEK]
, prob. not the same word as
δάκτυλοσ
finger, but of Semitic origin.]
(Bot.)
The fruit of the date palm; also, the date palm itself.
☞ This fruit is somewhat in the shape of an olive, containing a soft pulp, sweet, esculent, and wholesome, and inclosing a hard kernel.
Date palm
, or
Date tree
(Bot.)
,
the genus of palms which bear dates, of which common species is
Phœnix dactylifera
. See Illust.
Date plum
(Bot.)
,
the fruit of several species of
Diospyros
, including the American and Japanese persimmons, and the European lotus (
Diospyros Lotus
).
Date shell
, or
Date fish
(Zool.)
,
a bivalve shell, or its inhabitant, of the genus
Pholas
, and allied genera. See
Pholas
.

Date

,
Noun.
[F.
date
, LL.
data
, fr. L.
datus
given, p. p. of
dare
to give; akin to Gr.
[GREEK]
, OSlaw.
dati
, Skr.
dā
. Cf.
Datum
,
Dose
,
Dato
,
Die
.]
1.
That addition to a writing, inscription, coin, etc., which specifies the time (as day, month, and year) when the writing or inscription was given, or executed, or made;
as, the
date
of a letter, of a will, of a deed, of a coin
. etc.
And bonds without a
date
, they say, are void.
Dryden.
2.
The point of time at which a transaction or event takes place, or is appointed to take place; a given point of time; epoch;
as, the
date
of a battle
.
He at once,
Down the long series of eventful time,
So fixed the
dates
of being, so disposed
To every living soul of every kind
The field of motion, and the hour of rest.
Akenside.
3.
Assigned end; conclusion.
[R.]
What Time would spare, from Steel receives its
date
.
Pope.
4.
Given or assigned length of life; dyration.
[Obs.]
Good luck prolonged hath thy
date
.
Spenser.
Through his life’s whole
date
.
Chapman.
To bear date
,
to have the date named on the face of it; – said of a writing.

Date

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Dated
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Dating
.]
[Cf. F.
dater
. See 2d
Date
.]
1.
To note the time of writing or executing; to express in an instrument the time of its execution;
as, to
date
a letter, a bond, a deed, or a charter
.
2.
To note or fix the time of, as of an event; to give the date of;
as, to
date
the building of the pyramids
.
☞ We may say dated at or from a place.
The letter is
dated
at Philadephia.
G. T. Curtis.
You will be suprised, I don't question, to find among your correspondencies in foreign parts, a letter
dated from
Blois.
Addison.
In the countries of his jornal seems to have been written; parts of it are
dated from
them.
M. Arnold.

Date

,
Verb.
I.
To have beginning; to begin; to be dated or reckoned; – with from.
The Batavian republic
dates
from the successes of the French arms.
E. Everett.

Webster 1828 Edition


Date

DATE

, n.
1.
That addition to a writing which specifies the year, month and day when it was given or executed. In letters, it notes the time when they are written or sent; in deeds, contracts, wills and other papers, it specifies the time of execution, and usually the time from which they are to take effect and operate on the rights of persons. To the date is usually added the name of the place where a writing is executed, and this is sometimes included in the term date.
2.
The time when any event happened, when any thing was transacted, or when any thing is to be done; as the date of a battle; the date of Cesar's arrival in Britain.
3.
End; conclusion.
What time would spare, from steel receives its date. Pope.
4.
Duration; continuance; as, ages of endless date.

DATE

, v.t.
1.
To write or note the time when a letter is written, or a writing executed; to express, in an instrument, the year, month and day of its execution, and usually the place; as, to date a letter, a bond, a deed, or a charter.
2.
To note or fix the time of an event or transaction. Historians date the fulfillment of a prophecy at different periods.
3.
To note the time when something begins; as, to date a disease or calamity from a certain cause.

DATE

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To reckon.
2.
To begin; to have origin.
The Batavian republic dates from the successes of the French arms. E. Everett.

DATE

,
Noun.
The fruit of the great palm-tree, or date-tree, the Phoenix dactylifera. This fruit is somewhat in the shape of an acorn, composed of a thin light glossy membrane, somewhat pellucid and yellowish, containing a soft pulpy fruit, firm and sweet, esculent and wholesome, and in this is inclosed a hard kernel.

Definition 2022


Date

Date

See also: date and daté

English

Proper noun

Date

  1. A surname.

German

Etymology

From English date.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɛɪ̯t/, /deːt/
  • Hyphenation: Date

Noun

Date n (genitive Dates, plural Dates)

  1. (informal) date (romantic meeting)
  2. (informal) date (person with whom one has such a meeting)
  3. (informal, rather rare) date (non-romantic meeting)

Declension

Synonyms

Related terms

  • Dating

Japanese

Romanization

Date

  1. rōmaji reading of だて

date

date

See also: Date and daté

English

Dates (fruit)
A date palm

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Noun

date (plural dates)

  1. The fruit of the date palm, Phoenix dactylifera, somewhat in the shape of an olive, containing a soft, sweet pulp and enclosing a hard kernel.
    We made a nice cake from dates.
  2. The date palm.
    There were a few dates planted around the house.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowing from Old French date,from Late Latin data, from Latin datus (given), past participle of dare (to give); from Proto-Indo-European *deh₃- (to give).

Noun

date (plural dates)

  1. The addition to a writing, inscription, coin, etc., which specifies the time (especially the day, month, and year) when the writing or inscription was given, executed, or made.
    the date of a letter, of a will, of a deed, of a coin, etc.
    US date : 05/24/08 = Tuesday, May 24th, 2008. UK date : 24/05/08 = Tuesday 24th May 2008.
    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Friar
      And bonds without a date, they say, are void.
  2. A specific day in time at which a transaction or event takes place, or is appointed to take place; a given point of time
    the date for pleading
    The start date for the festival is September 2.
    • 1844, Mark Akenside, The Pleasures of the Imagination, Book II
      He at once, Down the long series of eventful time, So fix'd the dates of being, so disposed To every living soul of every kind The field of motion, and the hour of rest.
    Do you know the date of the wedding?
    We had to change the dates of the festival because of the flooding.
  3. A point in time
    You may need that at a later date.
  4. (rare) Assigned end; conclusion.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Alexander Pope,
      What Time would spare, from Steel receives its date.
  5. (obsolete) Given or assigned length of life; duration.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Edmund Spenser,
      Good luck prolonged hath thy date.
    • (Can we date this quote?) George Chapman (translator), Homer (author), The Odysseys of Homer, Volume 1, Book IV, lines 282–5,
      As now Saturnius, through his life's whole date,
      Hath Nestor's bliss raised to as steep a state,
      Both in his age to keep in peace his house,
      And to have children wise and valorous.
  6. A pre-arranged meeting.
    I arranged a date with my Australian business partners.
    • 1903, Guy Wetmore Carryl, The Lieutenant-Governor, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, page 121:
      "Why, Mr. Nisbet! I thought you were in New York."
      "I had a telegram this morning, calling the date off,"
  7. One's companion for social activities or occasions.
    I brought Melinda to the wedding as my date.
  8. A romantic meeting or outing with a lover or potential lover, or the person so met.
    We really hit it off on the first date, so we decided to meet the week after.
    We slept together on the first date.
    The cinema is a popular place to take someone on a date.
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations

Verb

date (third-person singular simple present dates, present participle dating, simple past and past participle dated)

  1. (transitive) To note the time of writing or executing; to express in an instrument the time of its execution.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Joseph Addison
      You will be surprised, I don't question, to find among your correspondencies in foreign parts, a letter dated from Blois.
    • 1801 [1796 January], William Cobbett, A New Year's Gift, Porcupine's works, footnote, page 430,
      I keep to the very words of the letter; but that, by "this State," is meant the State of Pennsylvania, cannot be doubted, especially when we see that the letter is dated at Philadelphia.
    • 1913 [1863], Marcus Aurelius, George Long (translator), Matthew Arnold (essay), The Thoughts of the Emperor M. Aurelius Antoninus, G. Bell and Sons, page 227,
      In these countries much of his Journal seems to have been written; parts of it are dated from them; and there, a few weeks before his fifty-ninth birthday, he fell sick and died.
    to date a letter, a bond, a deed, or a charter
  2. (transitive) To note or fix the time of, as of an event; to give the date of.
  3. (transitive) To determine the age of something.
    to date the building of the pyramids
  4. (transitive) To take (someone) on a date, or a series of dates.
  5. (transitive) To have a steady relationship with, to be romantically involved with.
    • 2008 May 15, NEWS.com.au, "Jessica Simpson upset John Mayer dating Jennifer Aniston":
      Jessica Simpson reportedly went on a drinking binge after discovering ex-boyfriend John Mayer is dating Jennifer Aniston.
  6. (intransitive) Of a couple, to be in a romantic relationship.
    They met a couple of years ago, but have been dating for about five months.
  7. (intransitive) To become old, especially in such a way as to fall out of fashion, become less appealing or attractive, etc.
    This show hasn't dated well.
  8. (intransitive, with from) To have beginning; to begin; to be dated or reckoned.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Edward Everett
      The Batavian republic dates from the successes of the French arms.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess:
      He stood transfixed before the unaccustomed view of London at night time, a vast panorama which reminded him [] of some wood engravings far off and magical, in a printshop in his childhood. They dated from the previous century and were coarsely printed on tinted paper, with tinsel outlining the design.
    • 2013 June 8, The new masters and commanders”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52:
      From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.
Usage notes
  • To note the time of writing one may say dated at or from a place.
Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: fixed · leaves · chair · #853: date · summer · simply · terrible

Anagrams


Aromanian

Numeral

date

  1. Alternative form of dzatse

Danish

Etymology

From English date.

Noun

date c (singular definite daten, plural indefinite dates)

  1. (informal) a date (meeting with a lover or potential lover)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Synonyms

Verb

date (imperative date, infinitive at date, present tense dater, past tense datede, perfect tense har datet)

  1. (informal) to date

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deɪte/
  • Rhymes: -eɪte

French

Etymology

From Old French date, a Borrowing from Late Latin data, from the feminine of Latin datus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dat/

Noun

date f (plural dates)

  1. date (point in time)

Interlingua

Participle

date

  1. past participle of dar

Italian

Noun

date f

  1. plural of data

Verb

date

  1. second-person plural present of dare
  2. second-person plural imperative of dare

Participle

date

  1. feminine plural of dato

Latin

Verb

date

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of

Participle

date

  1. vocative masculine singular of datus

Novial

Noun

date (plural dates)

  1. date (point in time)

Old French

Etymology

Borrowing from Late Latin data, from the feminine of Latin data.

Noun

date f (oblique plural dates, nominative singular date, nominative plural dates)

  1. date (point in time)
  2. date (fruit)

Descendants


Portuguese

Verb

date

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of datar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of datar
  3. first-person singular imperative of datar
  4. third-person singular imperative of datar

Spanish

Verb

date

  1. Compound of the informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of dar, da and the pronoun te.