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Webster 1913 Edition


Twist

Twist

(twĭst)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Twisted
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Twisting
.]
[OE.
twisten
, AS.
twist
a rope, as made of two (twisted) strands, fr.
twi-
two; akin to D.
twist
a quarrel, dissension, G.
zwist
, Dan. & Sw.
tvist
, Icel.
tvistr
the deuce in cards,
tvistr
distressed. See
Twice
,
Two
.]
1.
To contort; to writhe; to complicate; to crook spirally; to convolve.
Twist
it into a serpentine form.
Pope.
2.
Hence, to turn from the true form or meaning; to pervert;
as, to
twist
a passage cited from an author
.
3.
To distort, as a solid body, by turning one part relatively to another about an axis passing through both; to subject to torsion;
as, to
twist
a shaft
.
4.
To wreathe; to wind; to encircle; to unite by intertexture of parts.
“Longing to twist bays with that ivy.”
Waller.
There are pillars of smoke
twisted
about with wreaths of flame.
T. Burnet.
5.
To wind into; to insinuate; – used reflexively;
as, avarice
twists
itself into all human concerns
.
6.
To unite by winding one thread, strand, or other flexible substance, round another; to form by convolution, or winding separate things round each other;
as, to
twist
yarn or thread
.
Shak.
7.
Hence, to form as if by winding one part around another; to wreathe; to make up.
Was it not to this end
That thou began’st to
twist
so fine a story?
Shakespeare
8.
To form into a thread from many fine filaments;
as, to
twist
wool or cotton
.

Twist

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To be contorted; to writhe; to be distorted by torsion; to be united by winding round each other; to be or become twisted;
as, some strands will
twist
more easily than others
.
2.
To follow a helical or spiral course; to be in the form of a helix.

Twist

,
Noun.
1.
The act of twisting; a contortion; a flexure; a convolution; a bending.
Not the least turn or
twist
in the fibers of any one animal which does not render them more proper for that particular animal's way of life than any other cast or texture.
Addison.
2.
The form given in twisting.
[He] shrunk at first sight of it; he found fault with the length, the thickness, and the
twist
.
Arbuthnot.
3.
That which is formed by twisting, convoluting, or uniting parts.
Specifically: –
(a)
A cord, thread, or anything flexible, formed by winding strands or separate things round each other.
(b)
A kind of closely twisted, strong sewing silk, used by tailors, saddlers, and the like.
(c)
A kind of cotton yarn, of several varieties.
(d)
A roll of twisted dough, baked.
(e)
A little twisted roll of tobacco.
(f)
(Weaving)
One of the threads of a warp, – usually more tightly twisted than the filling.
(g)
(Firearms)
A material for gun barrels, consisting of iron and steel twisted and welded together;
as, Damascus
twist
.
(h)
(Firearms & Ord.)
The spiral course of the rifling of a gun barrel or a cannon.
(i)
A beverage made of brandy and gin.
[Slang]
4.
[OE.; – so called as being a
two
-forked branch. See
Twist
,
Verb.
T.
]
A twig.
[Obs.]
Chaucer. Fairfax.
Gain twist
, or
Gaining twist
(Firearms)
,
twist of which the pitch is less, and the inclination greater, at the muzzle than at the breech.
Twist drill
,
a drill the body of which is twisted like that of an auger. See Illust. of
Drill
.
Uniform twist
(Firearms)
,
a twist of which the spiral course has an equal pitch throughout.

Webster 1828 Edition


Twist

TWIST

, v.t.
1.
To unite by winding one thread, strand or other flexible substance round another; to form by convolution, or winding separate things round each other; as to twist yarn or thread. So we say, to double and twist.
2.
To form into a thread from many fine filaments; as, to twist wool or cotton.
3.
To contort; to writhe; as, to twist a thing into a serpentine form.
4.
To wreathe; to wind; to encircle.
--Pillars of smoke twisted about with wreaths of flame.
5.
To form; to weave; as, to twist a story.
6.
To unite by intertexture of parts; as, to twist bays with ivy.
7.
To unite; to enter by winding; to insinuate; as, avarice twists itself into all human concerns.
8.
To pervert; as, to twist a passage in an author.
9.
To turn from a straight line.

TWIST

,
Verb.
I.
To be contorted or united by winding round each other. Some strands will twist more easily than others.

TWIST

,
Noun.
A cord, thread or any thing flexible,formed by winding strands or separate things round each other.
1.
A cord; a string; a single cord.
2.
A contortion; a writhe.
3.
A little roll of tobacco.
4.
Manner of twisting.
5.
A twig. [Not in use.]

Definition 2022


Twist

Twist

See also: twist

German

Noun

Twist m (genitive Twists, plural Twists)

  1. (dancing) twist

Declension


Saterland Frisian

Etymology

Compare German Zwist.

Noun

Twist m

  1. discord; strife

twist

twist

See also: Twist

English

Noun

twist (plural twists)

  1. A twisting force.
  2. Anything twisted, or the act of twisting.
    • 1906, Edith Nesbit, The Railway Children Chapter 8
      Peter was always proud afterwards when he remembered that, with the Bargee's furious fingers tightening on his ear, the Bargee's crimson countenance close to his own, the Bargee's hot breath on his neck, he had the courage to speak the truth.
      "I wasn't catching fish," said Peter.
      "That's not your fault, I'll be bound," said the man, giving Peter's ear a twistnot a hard onebut still a twist.
    • Addison
      Not the least turn or twist in the fibres of any one animal which does not render them more proper for that particular animal's way of life than any other cast or texture.
  3. The form given in twisting.
    • Arbuthnot
      [He] shrunk at first sight of it; he found fault with the length, the thickness, and the twist.
  4. The degree of stress or strain when twisted.
  5. A type of thread made from two filaments twisted together.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.ii:
      the thrid / By griesly Lachesis was spun with paine, / That cruell Atropos eftsoones vndid, / With cursed knife cutting the twist in twaine [...].
  6. A sliver of lemon peel added to a cocktail, etc.
    • 2005, Theodore J. Albasini, The Progeny
      Bunny sat on the only remaining stool at the leather-padded oval bar in the Iron Lounge. It was happy hour, two drinks for the price of one. She decided on a martini with a twist, and while the bartender was preparing her drink, she scanned the faces looking at the bar.
  7. A sudden bend (or short series of bends) in a road, path, etc.
    • 1899, Edith Nesbit, The Wouldbegoods
      But here a twist in the stream brought us out from the bushes
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.
  8. A distortion to the meaning of a word or passage.
  9. An unexpected turn in a story, tale, etc.
    • 1987, October 23, “Caryn James”, in Movie Review: No Man's Land (1987)[New York Times]:
      Though set in Los Angeles, the film has a familiar, television look and feel - two handsome partners, cops, criminals, fast cars and a marginal romance. The twist in the buddy-car-chase formula is that here the good guys tend to blur into the bad.
    • 2012 May 24, Nathan Rabin, Film: Reviews: Men In Black 3”, in The Onion AV Club:
      In the abstract, Stuhlbarg’s twinkly-eyed sidekick suggests Joe Pesci in Lethal Weapon 2 by way of late-period Robin Williams with an alien twist, but Stuhlbarg makes a character that easily could have come across as precious into a surprisingly palatable, even charming man.
  10. A type of dance characterised by rotating one’s hips. See Wikipedia:Twist (dance)
    • 1997, April 22, “Jennifer Dunning”, in Surviving It All, Dismissals, Tours and Balanchine[New York Times]:
      She taught him to do the twist, having learned it herself from an Alvin Ailey dancer at Jacob's Pillow.
  11. A rotation of the body when diving.
  12. A sprain, especially to the ankle.
  13. (obsolete) A twig.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fairfax to this entry?)
  14. (slang) A girl, a woman.
  15. (obsolete) A roll of twisted dough, baked.
  16. A material for gun barrels, consisting of iron and steel twisted and welded together.
    Damascus twist
  17. The spiral course of the rifling of a gun barrel or a cannon.
  18. (obsolete, slang) A beverage made of brandy and gin.
  19. A strong individual tendency or bent; inclination.
    a twist toward fanaticism

Descendants

Translations

Verb

twist (third-person singular simple present twists, present participle twisting, simple past and past participle twisted)

  1. To turn the ends of something, usually thread, rope etc., in opposite directions, often using force.
  2. To join together by twining one part around another.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Chapter 15
      "Well, one day I went up in a balloon and the ropes got twisted, so that I couldn't come down again. It went way up above the clouds, so far that a current of air struck it and carried it many, many miles away. For a day and a night I traveled through the air, and on the morning of the second day I awoke and found the balloon floating over a strange and beautiful country."
  3. To contort; to writhe; to complicate; to crook spirally; to convolve.
    • Alexander Pope
      Twist it into a serpentine form.
  4. To wreathe; to wind; to encircle; to unite by intertexture of parts.
    • Waller
      longing to twist bays with that ivy
    • T. Burnet
      There are pillars of smoke twisted about wreaths of flame.
  5. (reflexive) To wind into; to insinuate.
    Avarice twists itself into all human concerns.
  6. To turn a knob etc.
  7. To distort or change the truth or meaning of words when repeating.
    • Exodus 23:8
      And you will not take a bribe, because a bribe will blind the alert, and will twist the words of the righteous.
  8. To form a twist (in any of the above noun meanings).
  9. To injure (a body part) by bending it in the wrong direction.
    • 1913, George Bernard Shaw, Pygmalion Act V
      Oh, you are a devil. You can twist the heart in a girl as easy as some could twist her arms to hurt her. Mrs. Pearce warned me. Time and again she has wanted to leave you; and you always got round her at the last minute. And you don't care a bit for her. And you don't care a bit for me.
    • 1901, Henry Lawson, Joe Wilson's Courtship
      Then Romany went down, then we fell together, and the chaps separated us. I got another knock-down blow in, and was beginning to enjoy the novelty of it, when Romany staggered and limped.
      ‘I’ve done,’ he said. ‘I’ve twisted my ankle.’ He’d caught his heel against a tuft of grass.
  10. (intransitive, of a path) To wind; to follow a bendy or wavy course; to have many bends.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.
    • 1926, Howard Phillips Lovecraft, He
      My coming to New York had been a mistake; for whereas I had looked for poignant wonder and inspiration in the teeming labyrinths of ancient streets that twist endlessly from forgotten courts and squares and waterfronts to courts and squares and waterfronts equally forgotten, and in the Cyclopean modern towers and pinnacles that rise blackly Babylonian under waning moons, I had found instead only a sense of horror and oppression which threatened to master, paralyze, and annihilate me.
  11. (transitive) To cause to rotate.
    • 1911, John Masefield, Jim Davis Chapter 8
      The tide seized us and swept us along, and in the races where this happened there were sucking whirlpools, strong enough to twist us round.
  12. (intransitive) To dance the twist (a type of dance characterised by twisting one's hips).
  13. (transitive) To coax.
    • 1932, Robert E. Howard, Dark Shanghai
      "On the three-thousand-dollar reward John Bain is offerin' for the return of his sister," said Ace. "Now listen--I know a certain big Chinee had her kidnapped outa her 'rickshaw out at the edge of the city one evenin'. He's been keepin' her prisoner in his house, waitin' a chance to send her up-country to some bandit friends of his'n; then they'll be in position to twist a big ransome outa John Bain, see? [...]"
  14. (card games) In the game of blackjack (pontoon or twenty-one), to be dealt another card.

Antonyms

(in blackjack, be dealt another card):: stick; stay

Translations

Derived terms

Anagrams


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪst

Noun

twist m (uncountable, diminutive twistje n)

  1. strife, discord
  2. dispute
  3. twist: dance, turn

Derived terms

Anagrams


Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʋist/
  • IPA(key): /ˈtwist/

Noun

twist

  1. twist (dance)

Declension

Inflection of twist (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative twist twistit
genitive twistin twistien
partitive twistiä twistejä
illative twistiin twisteihin
singular plural
nominative twist twistit
accusative nom. twist twistit
gen. twistin
genitive twistin twistien
partitive twistiä twistejä
inessive twistissä twisteissä
elative twististä twisteistä
illative twistiin twisteihin
adessive twistillä twisteillä
ablative twistiltä twisteiltä
allative twistille twisteille
essive twistinä twisteinä
translative twistiksi twisteiksi
instructive twistein
abessive twistittä twisteittä
comitative twisteineen

Derived terms


French

Etymology

From English

Noun

twist m (plural twists)

  1. twist (dance)

Derived terms


Portuguese

Noun

twist m (uncountable)

  1. twist (type of dance)

Spanish

Noun

twist m (plural twists)

  1. twist