Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Gin

Gin

,
p
rep.
[AS.
ge
Noun.
See
Again
.]
Against; near by; towards;
as,
gin
night
.
[Scot.]
A. Ross (1778).

Gin

,
c
onj.
[See
Gin
,
prep
.]
If.
[Scotch]
Jamieson.

Gin

(gĭn)
,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Gan
(găn)
,
Gon
(gŏn), or
Gun
(gŭn);
p. pr. & vb. n.
Ginning
.]
[OE.
ginnen
, AS.
ginnan
(in comp.), prob. orig., to open, cut open, cf. OHG. in
ginnan
to begin, open, cut open, and prob. akin to AS.
gīnan
to yawn, and E.
yawn
. √31. See
Yawn
,
Verb.
I.
, and cf.
Begin
.]
To begin; – often followed by an infinitive without to;
as,
gan
tell
. See
Gan
.
[Obs. or Archaic]
“He gan to pray.”
Chaucer.

Gin

(jĭn)
,
Noun.
[Contr. from
Geneva
. See 2d
Geneva
.]
A strong alcoholic liquor, distilled from rye and barley, and flavored with juniper berries; – also called
Hollands
and
Holland gin
, because originally, and still very extensively, manufactured in Holland. Common gin is usually flavored with turpentine.

Gin

,
Noun.
[A contraction of
engine
.]
1.
Contrivance; artifice; a trap; a snare.
Chaucer. Spenser.
2.
(a)
A machine for raising or moving heavy weights, consisting of a tripod formed of poles united at the top, with a windlass, pulleys, ropes, etc.
(b)
(Mining)
A hoisting drum, usually vertical; a whim.
3.
A machine for separating the seeds from cotton; a cotton gin.
☞ The name is also given to an instrument of torture worked with screws, and to a pump moved by rotary sails.
Gin block
,
a simple form of tackle block, having one wheel, over which a rope runs; – called also
whip gin
,
rubbish pulley
, and
monkey wheel
.
Gin power
,
a form of horse power for driving a cotton gin.
Gin race
, or
Gin ring
,
the path of the horse when putting a gin in motion.
Halliwell.
Gin saw
,
a saw used in a cotton gin for drawing the fibers through the grid, leaving the seed in the hopper.
Gin wheel
.
(a)
In a cotton gin, a wheel for drawing the fiber through the grid; a brush wheel to clean away the lint.
(b)
(Mining)
the drum of a whim.

Gin

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Ginned
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Ginning
.]
1.
To catch in a trap.
[Obs.]
Beau. & Fl.
2.
To clear of seeds by a machine;
as, to
gin
cotton
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Gin

GIN

,
Noun.
A contraction of Geneva, a distilled spirit. [See Geneva.]

GIN

,
Noun.
[A contraction of engine.] A machine or instrument by which the mechanical powers are employed in aid of human strength. The word is applied to various engines, as a machine for driving piles, another for raising weights, &c., and a machine for separating the seeds from cotton, invented by E.Whitney, is called a cotton-gin. It is also the name given to an engine of torture, and to a pump moved by rotary sails.
1.
A trap; a snare.

GIN

,
Verb.
T.
To clear cotton of its seeds by a machine which separates them with expedition.
1.
To catch in a trap.

GIN

,
Verb.
I.
To begin.

Definition 2022


Gin

Gin

See also: gin, GIN, ĝin, gīn, and -gin

German

Noun

Gin m

  1. gin (liquor made from juniper berries)

gin

gin

See also: Gin, GIN, ĝin, gīn, and -gin

English

Noun

gin (countable and uncountable, plural gins)

  1. A colourless non-aged alcoholic liquor made by distilling fermented grains such as barley, corn, oats or rye with juniper berries; the base for many cocktails.
  2. (uncountable) Gin rummy.
  3. (poker) Drawing the best card or combination of cards.
    Johnny Chan held jack-nine, and hit gin when a queen-ten-eight board was dealt out.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
References
  • gin” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  • gin in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Etymology 2

Aphetism of Old French engin (engine).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: jĭn, IPA(key): /dʒɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • Homophone: djinn

Noun

gin (plural gins)

  1. (obsolete) A trick; a device or instrument.
  2. (obsolete) Contrivance; artifice; a trap; a snare.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  3. A snare or trap for game.
  4. A machine for raising or moving heavy objects, consisting of a tripod formed of poles united at the top, with a windlass, pulleys, ropes, etc.
  5. (mining) A hoisting drum, usually vertical; a whim.
  6. A pile driver.
  7. A windpump.
  8. A cotton gin.
  9. An instrument of torture worked with screws.

Translations

Related terms

Verb

gin (third-person singular simple present gins, present participle ginning, simple past and past participle ginned)

  1. (transitive) To remove the seeds from cotton with a cotton gin.
  2. (transitive) To trap something in a gin.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English ginnen, from Old English ginnan (to open; to cut open).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪn/

Verb

gin (third-person singular simple present gins, present participle ginning, simple past gan, past participle gun)

  1. (archaic) To begin.

Etymology 4

Borrowing from Dharug dyin, but having acquired a derogatory tone.[1]

Noun

gin (plural gins)

  1. (Australia, now considered offensive) An Aboriginal woman.
    • 1869, Thomas Livingstone Mitchell, Three Expeditions into the Interior of Eastern Australia, Volume 1, page 273,
      His next shot was discharged amongst the mob, and most unfortunately wounded the gin already mentioned ; who, with a child fastened to her back, slid down the bank, and lay, apparently dying, with her legs in the water.
    • 1894, Ivan Dexter, Talmud: A Strange Narrative of Central Australia, published in serial form in Port Adelaide News and Lefevre's Peninsula Advertiser (SA), Chapter XXI,
      From my position I could see the gins pointing back, and as the men turned they looked for a moment and then made a wild rush for the entrance.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, D. Appleton-Century, 1943, Chapter XXI, p. 353,
      How they must have laughed about the strutting of her whose mother was a wanton and aunt a gin!
    • 1988, Tom Cole, **** West and Crooked, Angus & Robertson, 1995, p.179,
      Dad said Shoesmith and Thompson had made one error that cost them their lives by letting the gins into the camp, and the blacks speared them all.
    • 2008, Bill Marsh, Jack Goldsmith, Goldie: Adventures in a Vanishing Australia, unnumbered page,
      But there was this gin there, see, what they called a kitchen girl.
Related terms
Synonyms
Derived terms
References
  1. R. M. W. Dixon, Australian Aboriginal Words, Oxford University Press, 1990, ISBN 0-19-553099-3, page 167.

Anagrams


French

Etymology

Borrowing from English gin.

Pronunciation

Noun

gin m (plural gins)

  1. gin

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish gainithir (is born), from Proto-Celtic *gan-yo- (compare Welsh geni (be born, bear)) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (compare English kin, Latin gignō (beget, bear), Greek γίγνομαι (gígnomai, become), Sanskrit जनति (janati, beget)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɟɪnʲ/

Noun

gin f (genitive singular gine, nominative plural ginte)

  1. begetting, birth
  2. fetus
  3. offspring, child, person
  4. generating source

Declension

Derived terms

Verb

gin (present analytic gineann, future analytic ginfidh, verbal noun giniúint, past participle ginte)

    1. give birth to (used only in the autonomous form)
    2. germinate, sprout; spring forth; originate
    1. beget, procreate
    2. generate, produce

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • athghin (regenerate, verb)

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gin ghin ngin
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

  • "gin" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • gainithir” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Japanese

Romanization

gin

  1. rōmaji reading of ぎん

Lojban

Rafsi

gin

  1. rafsi of jgina.

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪn/

Etymology 1

Apparently reduced from gien (given), under the influence of gif.

Conjunction

gin

  1. if (conditional; subjunctive)
    Gin A war ye, A wad gang. ― If I were you, I would go.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)

Etymology 2

From Old English [Term?].

Preposition

gin

  1. Against; nearby; towards.
    gin night(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of A. Ross (1778) to this entry?)

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish gainithir (is born), from Proto-Celtic *gan-yo- (compare Welsh geni (be born, bear)) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (compare English kin, Latin gignō (beget, bear), Ancient Greek γίγνομαι (gígnomai, become), Sanskrit जनति (janati, beget)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /gʲin/

Verb

gin (past ghin, future ginidh, verbal noun gintinn, past participle ginte)

  1. beget, produce, father
  2. create, engender
  3. procreate, reproduce
  4. breed
  5. (computing) generate

Derived terms

References

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, ISBN 0 901771 92 9
  • gainithir” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowing from English gin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɪn/ or IPA(key): /dʒɪn/

Noun

gin n

  1. gin (liquor)

Anagrams


Wiradhuri

Noun

gin

  1. Alternative spelling of geen